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How Does Everybody Afford This Diet


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8 replies to this topic

#1 hfcny

 
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Posted 28 September 2006 - 04:21 PM

I was diagnoised 4 months ago abd I am on a very very limited budget, how does everybody do this? I am still having a lot of problems but after reading some of the post I gues I need to find out what some of my other food allergies might me. Is the gluten free bread bad for us? I love cheese and I can not tolarte that veg and soy stuff, I have been able to drink the almond milk, but t he cheeses I could not handle. I had a weight loss surgery 6 years ago matter of fact that is what brought this to the surface for me, and because of that I can not tolarte sweet pot, broccoli calfiflower you know all the good stuff, and I am not a big rice eater. I do like basmita and someone suggested the brown rice so I will try t hat. I have been having a lot of trouble with low blood sugars because I can not afford to eat my bread like I need to. I will try the white corn that was suggated to me also. What luncheon meat is safe as due to my weight loss surgery I am suppose to eat 90 grams of protien a day. This diet does confuse me a lot as I have not had a chance to get to the support group as I was sick :( .
I just don't know how I can do this because of the cost does anyone have suggestions?
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#2 AndreaB

 
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Posted 28 September 2006 - 04:30 PM

Are you still on dairy? Dairy (cheese) could be causing you problems as well. If you can, I would suggest going off of it for six months and giving yourself a chance to heal.

As far as the diet, I too have found it more expensive only because I was a vegan before hand and lived off of gluten and soy. Your basic meats, veggies and fruits need to be a main stay. It should be pretty easy to get your protein in without the dairy. Can't fruits help with the blood sugar?

Brown rice is very good and does have some good fiber and protein.

If you are willing to make your own bread, the startup cost could be more but the savings in the long run far outweigh that.
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Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.


#3 marciab

 
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Posted 28 September 2006 - 04:40 PM

I eat whole foods and whole gluten free whole grains. And I buy most of it in bulk from the health food store .. be careful with the bulk bins though .. you only want to buy from these if you are certain that there is no cross contamination ...

I just eat the gluten free specialty foods from time to time as a treat. I no longer make the breads, since I found out I feel a whole lot better when I am not eating processed grains ... good luck ... marcia
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Jan 1990 - Dx CFS/ME/FM (URI's, Ataxia, myoclonus, orthostatic hypotension, insomnia, brain fog, swollen lymph nodes, sore throat... ) Completely Disabled (housebound and bedridden at times)

2004 - Digestive pain all the time.

May 2004 - Hiatal hernia, erosive gastritis, gastroparesis (endoscopy)
August 2004 - Colon polyps, diverticulitus, internal hemorrhoids (colonoscopy)

No relief from Nexium, Prilosec, Protonix, Zelnorm, Miralax, Imodium, Lomotil ...
July 2005 - GP recommended WFDFSFEFCF + vegan (Also, anything that hurts free)
Immediately stopped needing naps and digestive pain reduced.

Sept 2005 - GFDFCFSFEF + chemical free - Immediately stopped feeling jittery / buzzing and digestive issues were much better.

June 2006 - Dx B12 and iron deficient. Started B12 injections and using cast iron pan.

August 2006 - MYOCLONUS GONE. (off Klonopin)
September 2006 - ATAXIA, INSOMNIA and Feeling like the floor was moving under my feet gone.

June 19, 2007 - Positive DQ2, Dx Celiac

October 2007 - Sleeping like a baby, waking up with energy, but still having fatigue/stamina issues

Nov 2007 - Started Paleo diet for chronic hypoglycemia

April 2008 - GTT normal. I'm no longer hypoglycemic. Started Low oxalate diet for kidney stones.

May 1, 2008 - Began salt loading for OI/NMH - noticed immediately muscle weakness was gone. I was sodium deficient but my labs don't reflect it. Still working on OI and PEM.

#4 hfcny

 
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Posted 28 September 2006 - 04:50 PM

Are you still on dairy? Dairy (cheese) could be causing you problems as well. If you can, I would suggest going off of it for six months and giving yourself a chance to heal.

As far as the diet, I too have found it more expensive only because I was a vegan before hand and lived off of gluten and soy. Your basic meats, veggies and fruits need to be a main stay. It should be pretty easy to get your protein in without the dairy. Can't fruits help with the blood sugar?

Brown rice is very good and does have some good fiber and protein.

If you are willing to make your own bread, the startup cost could be more but the savings in the long run far outweigh that.

I love to cook. I am just having a hard time finding a good bread recp. I tried one in BH book the french bread and it tasted like fried mush. What is okay luncheon meat? Does any one have aeal good bread rect?

I love to cook. I am just having a hard time finding a good bread recp. I tried one in BH book the french bread and it tasted like fried mush. What is okay luncheon meat? Does any one have aeal good bread rect?

Yes I am still on the cheese am having a very hard time giving that up. I know I have to though until I heal

I eat whole foods and whole gluten free whole grains. And I buy most of it in bulk from the health food store .. be careful with the bulk bins though .. you only want to buy from these if you are certain that there is no cross contamination ...

I just eat the gluten free specialty foods from time to time as a treat. I no longer make the breads, since I found out I feel a whole lot better when I am not eating processed grains ... good luck ... marcia

I live in upstate new York area syracuse and they do not have the big bins, how about ordering the bulkk through the mail is that safe?
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#5 jukie

 
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Posted 28 September 2006 - 05:24 PM

Can't help with the bread recipes as I'm not really eating it yet. As for ordering in bulk, I've read here that Amazon has good prices on some things. Also, Asian markets are a great place to find rice and some other items at good prices. I'm still learning my way around this diet, but have finally realized I can find a LOT at the regular grocery store and only go elsewhere for very few things. Come to think of it, most of the "specialty" items I'm purchasing at the health food store are for my 5 year old. Anyway, I know it's not much, but hope it helps :)

Oh, and here's a listing of some gluten-free lunchmeats from Hormel. The have a great gluten-free product listing at: http://www.hormel.co...sp?catitemid=41

Pre-Packaged Refrigerated Lunch Meats Not Containing Gluten

* HORMEL® Spiced Ham
* HORMEL® BLACK LABEL® Chopped Ham
* HORMEL® Deli Sliced Black Forest Ham
* HORMEL® Deli Sliced Cooked Corned Beef
* HORMEL® Deli Sliced Cooked Ham
* HORMEL® Deli Sliced Cooked Pastrami
* HORMEL® Deli Sliced Double Smoked Ham
* HORMEL® Deli Sliced Honey Ham
* HORMEL® Deli Sliced Oven Roasted Turkey Breast
* HORMEL® Deli Sliced Prosciuto Ham
* HORMEL® Deli Sliced Seasoned Roast Beef
* HORMEL® Deli Sliced Smoked Turkey Breast
* HORMEL® HOMELAND® Hard Salami
* HORMEL® NATURAL CHOICE™ Honey Deli Ham
* HORMEL® NATURAL CHOICE™ Cooked Deli Ham
* HORMEL® NATURAL CHOICE™ Smoked Deli Ham
* HORMEL® NATURAL CHOICE® Honey Deli Turkey
* HORMEL® NATURAL CHOICE® Oven Roasted Deli Turkey
* HORMEL® NATURAL CHOICE® Smoked Deli Turkey
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#6 AndreaB

 
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Posted 28 September 2006 - 05:54 PM

I love to cook. I am just having a hard time finding a good bread recp. I tried one in BH book the french bread and it tasted like fried mush. What is okay luncheon meat? Does any one have aeal good bread rect?


As far as store bought bread my family has liked enjoy life sandwich bread, and food for life breads (not ezekiel), their rice breads...they also have a millet bread.

I make homemade bread from Annalise Roberts gluten-free Baking Classics cookbook. It does use dairy and eggs in the cookbook. I just sub the dairy. I can eat eggs so I don't have to worry about that.
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Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.


#7 Guest_AutumnE_*

 
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Posted 28 September 2006 - 06:32 PM

For bread I use kinnikinnick bread and bun mix. It costs $6 plus change and it makes about 4 loafs of bread.
I dont put milk in it, just water for regular bread. It is kinda crumby but it has a good flavor. My 2 year old loves it.

For lunch meat I use walmart great value turkey breast and ham lunch meats. It lists gluten free on the label. Very cost effective and tastes good too.
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#8 RiceGuy

 
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Posted 29 September 2006 - 04:33 AM

I make all my food from scratch, except for VERY rare occasions when I'll have something as a special treat. Otherwise it would certainly cost a fortune.

If you aren't a big rice eater, you may want to pick up the habit :) There are a number of different rices to choose from, and the texture/taste vary widely. So try different ones and in different recipes too. I particularly like the short grain rices, since they tend to have a "sticky" texture (commonly used in Asian cooking) as opposed to the dryer seporated texture of long grain rices (like those in Italian dishes). It's just a matter of preference.

Anyway, there are plenty of other grains to experiment with, such as millet, quinoa, teff, amaranth, buckwheat, etc. Of course, if you can eat corn, that's quite versatile too, and there's nothing stopping you from mixing different ones together. Just account for any differences in cooking times.

When you say you can't tolerate veggies, do you mean you don't like them, or you have some sort of digestive reaction to them? In either case it can be that you need to adjust to them. Start small, and work your way into more at a comfortable pace. You do need the nutrients, so it's either veggies (and of course fruits) or spending a ton on supplements. The choice is yours, but you'll certainly do far better with whole, nutritious foods.
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A spherical meteorite 10 km in diameter traveling at 20 km/s has the kinetic energy equal to the calories in 550,000,000,000,000,000 Twinkies.

#9 happygirl

 
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Posted 29 September 2006 - 05:10 AM

A lot of the applegate farms lunch meats and other products are gluten free. I think I used to buy the Oscar Meyer shaved deli slices (that come in a little plastic container). I eat them in lettuce wraps, or (if you can tolerate dairy), put cheese in the middle and do a 'roll-up' with the meat and cheese...or a rollup with meat and cream cheese.

try the kinnicknick pizza crusts...kind of like a flat bread....I really enjoyed them! Also, bob's red mill makes a good mix...serve it warm with butter.

(I can't eat them anymore due to other issues, but this is what I used to eat.) Hope it helps.
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