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Soy Allergy?
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9 posts in this topic

Hi!

I have been gluten free since June but I am still not feeling better! I eliminated casein, and i think that helped some, but I have come to think that I must have other intolerances/allergies. I had a scratch test about 5 months ago and I came back positive on many different foods, but I understand that does not necessary mean I am allergic, and that now it is all about threshold testing. I think that I am allergic to soy because I feel sick after I eat something that has soy cheese or another type of soy in it. However, I cannot tell if it is just a self-fulfilling prophecy now because I never feel well, so after I eat something and feel sick I "blame" what I just ate.

How can you tell if you are really allergic to something?

I have been avoiding soy for a while, but I just found out that the almond milk that I make lattes with every morning has soy lection in it. Is that trivial amount of soy enough to make someone with a "minor" soy allergy sick?

I just want to feel better :(

Thank you!

-Dana

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You really need to get all the soy out of your diet for at least a couple of weeks to a month, every last bit of it, even if it means no processed food in that time. Then eat a big piece of tofu or drink a glass of soy milk and see what happens.

PS, I have a recipe for homemade almond milk on my website.

Do you eat many tree nuts? You could be sensitive to them.

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OK, I will avoid soy completely! :(

Wow, i would love to try and make my own almond milk!

I don't have very much time to cook now (i'm a college student) Do you know of any brands that are gluten/casien/soy free?

thanks!

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OK, I will avoid soy completely! :(

Wow, i would love to try and make my own almond milk!

I don't have very much time to cook now (i'm a college student) Do you know of any brands that are gluten/casien/soy free?

thanks!

Hey, I'm a gluten/soy free college student with no time too. :) We could at least commiserate together. :)

I found a website, www.allergenfreegrocer.com I think, and it let you search for foods by what allergens you were avoiding. You could probably find some stuff on there. :)

Good luck!

Shalia

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www.allergygrocer.com

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www.allergygrocer.com

That's it. Thank you. :) I forgot to bookmark it and I couldn't find it again.

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Thank you so much!

I can't wait to feel better!!!

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For an allergy you would have an immediate reaction, for an intolerance you could have a reaction that starts within a few hours and goes on for a couple days, or it may take up to two days for a reaction. I'm posting a sheet that my doctor gave me. It is really important to keep a food journal to try and track what is the culprit.

Food Allergies

Food allergies are a problem created by a disordered immune system. Normally, the immune system, or body’s military team, is designed to attack disease-causing germs such as bacteria and viruses. Sometimes, however, the immune system gets “confused”, and begins attacking harmless proteins such as those breathed in the air [pollens, mold spores, etc.] or ingested [proteins in our foods]. We call such a reaction an allergy. Allergy symptoms are many and diverse; the most commonly recognized being itching of eyes and nose, runny or stuffy nose and sinuses (“hay fever”), difficulty breathing or asthma, and rashes such as hives or eczema. Not as commonly appreciated is that these immune system reactions can also cause many other symptoms such as; headaches, especially migraines, fatigue, sore throat, arthritis or joint pains, stomach distress, colitis, gall bladder attacks, etc. Even such disorders as epilepsy, spontaneous miscarriages, heart attacks, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, high blood pressure, etc., may have an allergic basis.

You might say, “I feel fine nearly all the time; why should I check for allergies. While it may not be necessary, many individuals discover that they are able to enjoy even better quality of life when they avoid their “problem foods”.

How does one know which foods are “problem foods”? That can be a difficult question. Fortunately, several tests can be useful. One measures the amount of immunoglobulin G present in the blood which is specific to a certain food, another measures the amount of immunoglobulin E. Other tests check for concentrations of antigen:antibody complexes, or look for swelling in white blood cells. The test most frequently useful is that which measures the concentration of the immunoglobulin G, or “IgG”.

Depending in which type of testing is performed, the significant levels will be listed differently. If RAST testing is done, [e.g. Serolab], usually the important foods will have counts greater than 3,000 (or _____). If ELISA testing is done, [e.g. US Biotek], levels greater than “No Reaction” are usually considered relevant.

However, laboratories can make mistakes. Therefore it advisable to experiment with the “problem” foods to see if they actually do produce any problems.

The preferred method is called “elimination diet and challenge testing”. It means strictly avoiding any food which is on the “problem list” (shows an elevated level of antibodies) for about 3 weeks [at least 2 weeks]. Then testing or “challenging” each food one time only, beginning with those foods having the lowest positive [but significant] reaction. Do not eat the tested food again until all problem foods have been tested. The next food is tested after 3 days, (or 24 hours after any reaction has subsided--whichever is first). The amount of the test food is usually not critical. Any amount from 1 tablespoon to 1 quart is acceptable. Other “safe” foods may be eaten at he same meal as the test food.

Observe carefully for any symptoms, especially within the first hour, 6-8 hours after ingestion, and 24 hours after the test meal. It is wise to keep a diary or journal, so you can recall what specific symptoms were experienced, and how long it was after the test meal until they occurred. It is sometimes helpful if a family member also is observing for any personality changes or other objective symptoms.

A typical reaction to a problem food might be as follows. The “problem food” [cheese, for example] is eaten for breakfast at 8:00 am. Half an hour later, you notice some sniffling and sneezing. An hour later, you feel jittery, shaky inside. Four hours after breakfast slight nausea is noted. Seven hours after the test meal [3:00 PM], you get a headache. This continues, gradually worsening, the rest of the day. The following morning you awaken feeling very tired, exhausted. As you drag out of bed, you notice that your joints feel stiff and a little sore. They gradually “limber up” as the day progresses, but you feel tired throughout the entire day. The following morning you awaken beginning to feel more like your normal self. Just eating one problem food once could cause this 48-hour ordeal.

After all problem foods have been tested, decide which ones caused symptoms worse than the trouble of trying to avoid the causative foods. Ideally, one strictly avoids all those foods for a period of 4 to 6 months, after which they are each tested again. The goal is to assist the body in “forgetting” those foods are “problem foods” so they may be safely eaten again. This may take some time, but can be worthwhile.

Another method of dealing with allergy foods is to eat them only occasionally. Eating a problem food at intervals of 4 days or more frequently minimizes the symptoms produced. This can be easier than strictly avoiding the food, though the immune system may not “forget” to “fight” a food that is eaten intermittently. The “bottom line” rule of thumb is to be no stricter about your diet than you need to be in order to feel as good as it is possible for you to feel.

If you would like a more thorough explanation of this topic, please consult one of several excellent books that are available.

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For an allergy you would have an immediate reaction, for an intolerance you could have a reaction that starts within a few hours and goes on for a couple days, or it may take up to two days for a reaction. I'm posting a sheet that my doctor gave me. It is really important to keep a food journal to try and track what is the culprit.

Andrea - thats a great pamphlet. The "typical reaction" scenerio was like walking through some of my reactions. I've never seen anything from a doctor or allergist that was that open-minded and easily understandable.

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