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Shampoos Detergents And Soap
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35 posts in this topic

brizzo,

I won't scream at you, but I do question your opinion on this matter. I started having a DH problem after being gluten free for over three years. After three months of sheer torture with my face covered with blisters, I finally contacted several gluten intolerance associations for help. They each advised me to check whether my shampoos, conditioners, makeups, detergents, etc., contained gluten. Lo and behold, the shampoo I'd been using for the past three months listed wheat germ in it. After discontinuing use of the shampoo, the DH resolved itself. And, no, I didn't ingest any shampoo....just in case you're thinking that. Of course, it's possible that it touched my lips, but it should have rinsed off just fine. That said, isn't gluten simply a nutrient like any other? I use a number of transdermal nutrient products because I have empaired ability to absorb fat-soluble vitamins. Since THEY are able to reach the cellular level, it makes sense that gluten does, too. However, without studies on this particular matter, there's a lot of misinformation--in my opinion--so I have to go with my own personal experiences.

Rose Tapper....brizzo is 100% correct with the information given. Even people with DH can handle gluten and that will not cause a reaction that is Celiac related.

This is a big point of confusion for people. If a person reacts to a lotion or shampoo topically, then they most likely have an ALLERGY to an ingredient and that ingredient could very well be wheat. It is very possible to have both Celiac/DH and a wheat allergy. Otherwise, you would have to drink the shampoo to cause

an internal reaction.

The other issue is that gluten cannot be absorbed through the skin, period. Molecule is too large for passage. It could enter the bloodstream, as brizzo stated, through an open wound but I am still not sure whether that would be a problem either as gluten HAS TO get into the GI tract for a reaction to occur. It is safe to use intravenous meds with gluten so I have my doubts about the other. Allergies are a different animal with a different reaction process, even though the symptoms can be the same. The reason your vitamins can be absorbed through the skin is because they are formulated that way by the manufacturer, otherwise, they wouldn't be absorbed. Gluten can only reach cellular levels by eating it or breathing it in as whatever you breathe in may make it's way into your gut.

The reason doctors may advise a patient to stay away from all gluten can be because they themselves are not up-to-date on correct information or those that are figure the majority of the public, with little to no medical background or training, will have difficulty processing all the required information to get the diet right so tell them to avoid all gluten to make it easier and ensure compliance. The best thing any Celiac can do is to learn as much as possible, with the correct information, so they will not make the mistake of thinking they cannot touch any gluten without a DH reaction. Dr. Peter Green's book is an excellent way to start.

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DO NOT use the "Tide 7 signs". I tried it and loved it for my laundry, but began breaking out all over my arms, back and stomach. It is very unfriendly to DH.

I can, however, use the other Tide products. I use the one in the white bottle -- no dyes, no perfumes, no worries.

Good luck. :)

looking for suggestions on detergents for laundering, shampoos, and soaps. my husband has DH and i don't know what to look for as far as chemicals and additives in these items. did purchase dove shampoo.
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Best shampoo I have found: Desert Essence Organics. I like the red raspberry variety of the shampoo as it really does make my hair shine. Cleans well and smells good. I got it at Whole Foods. It says on the label it is 100% Vegan, gluten and wheat free, has no parabens, sodium lauryl or laureth sulfates, no phthalates, artificial fragrances or colors, no silicone, EDTA, glycol, or petroleum based ingredients. Cruelty Free: no animal testing. No phosphates. Biodegradable.

As for whether gluten on the skin goes internal, in my experience the reaction to it can, even if the molecule "can't". I've had it happen several times, getting a definitely gluten reaction from various "external" products such as shampoos. My main gluten reaction is mental confusion, dazedness, ADD, and short term memory problems, not a skin reaction at all, and this is what happens in reaction to some shampoos and soaps. My brain is being affected enough to make me search out the culprit, and it is the gluten-containing products. My skull-encased brain seems pretty internal to me! If it is "only" an allergic reaction, it's certainly one I have to pay attention to and prevent. I am not classed as a true celiac, though I do have ulcerative colitis.

Think about the trans-dermal hormone patches and nicotine patches doctors devised and use... if chemicals didn't absorb through the skin layer, those treatments shouldn't work at all. No cut in the skin is necessary for them to work, either. Even if the gluten molecule is too big to go through whole, I'm guessing the capillaries must contact it, or pieces of it, enough to set off the internal chain reaction of biological freak-out. I may have doubts about the bio-medical aspects of this, but I have no doubts about my experiences and will go by what I have found true in my case.

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I know that there is a lot of people on here who will scream at me for saying this but here goes...

Unless you are eating the soap/shampoo/ect.. You can use whatever you want. DH is caused by antibodies getting attached to gluten proteins in the bloodstream via the digestive track (vie eating/drinking). After these antibodies attach themselves to the gluten protein, this "attachment" gets trapped in the smaller capillaries in the body (just below the skin surface. Thus, causing a herpetiformis rash.

The gluten protein MUST enter the bloodstream to cause this reaction. There are only 2 ways that this will happen!

1. put gluten into your stomach.

2. have a cut on your skin, and rub/pour/insert the gluten protein into it.

Unless you are dealing with open head wounds/ or skin tears on the body. The type of shampoo you use should not exacerbate any DH symptoms.

If you need some peer reviewed journals/studies on this topic. I will be happy to provide for you. Just send me an e-mail

Good Luck. Brizzo

I beg to differ with you. For years I have thought that I was allergy to different soaps, turns out I am allergy to the wheat. Now I am finding out that even things that have wheat in it effect me. Unless you have this problem I feel you should not come down on us who do.

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I use joico shampoo and conditioner www.joico.com they emailed me a list of their gluten-free products and indicate that their vitamin E is synthetic.

Also recommended from my derm I use Vanicream and free and clear. You can get it at some drugstores or order it online. They have shampoo, conditioner, sunscreen, lotion, lipbalm, shaving cream, soap, skin cleanser etc..

http://www.psico.com/

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here is a list, and you can also find several post on this web site just by googling things like- are neutrogena prodducts gluten free?

How to Find Gluten Free Makeup

By brantsbabe, eHow Member

I want to do this! What's This?

User-Submitted Article

If you're gluten intolerant and have skin problems to accompany this condition, like dermatitis herpeteformis, hives, or eczema, you need to make sure your makeup is gluten free. I've done the research for you. Here's some good gluten free makeup choices.

Difficulty: EasyInstructions

1Take a Good Look in Your Makeup Bag!

Using the ingredient list below, check all of your current makeup for the ingredients listed. If you no longer have the packaging do an online search at a drugstore. Throw out products that have gluten, and start over. (if you don't have skin problems associated with gluten, you can decide whether or not to replace face products. Lipstick or anything that could get in your mouth, however, should be gluten free)

2Know What Cosmetic Ingredients Include Gluten:

Here are some ingredients you might find in cosmetics that could indicate wheat or gluten:

hyrolyzed malt extract

hydrolyzed wheat protein

hydrolyzed vegetable protein

wheat germ

vitamin e

cyclodextrin

barley extract

fermented grain extract

oat (avena sativa)

stearyldimoniumhydroxypropyl

samino peptide complex

phytosphingosine extract

triticum vulgare

dextrin

dextrin palmitate

maltodextrin

Secale Cereale

Sodium C8-16 Isoalkylsuccinyl Wheat Protein Sulfonate

yeast extract

anything with wheat in the name

3Try Some of These Brands:

Try Smashbox

This line of cosmetics is mostly gluten free. Many people with gluten

intolerance issues use this brand. Sephora has mostly gluten free items

too.

Check Out Avon

Avon has an extensive list of gluten free makeup, and it's not expensive. Here is a link to a list of Avon products that are gluten free.

Try Neutrogena

Neutrogena is a great choice for gluten free makeup, and it's pretty cheap too. You can find Neutrogena products at any drug store. See resources below for some gluten free makeup choices from Neutrogena:

Afterglow Cosmetics

The entire line is gluten free. It is supposedly a line of makeup produced by someone with Celiac disease. The extra bonus is that it's cornstarch free too. This is a mineral makeup. If you like minerals, you'll love this brand. It's a bit more expensive than drugstore brands, but worth it if it helps your skin.

I think thats enough if you are cautious enough to not put gluten inside of you, then you should be cautious enough to put it on the outside of you.

I love neutrogena, and I really like the t-sal, t-fal, shampoo and conditioner. Plus the rainbath etc. If you have irritations that are not quite sores--say under your arms, the body oil is great--I used this for quite awhile cause I couldn't use deoderant--it was awesome. The makeup is great also.

Also, Gain is a good laundry soap. You can get both of these products at Costco as well as Wall mart and not have to pay through the nose :-)

that's my two cents--hope it helps.

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Hi Mona--welcome to the board! :)

Dove will clearly list any gluten, so you're ok there. In addition to gluten-free products, I also choose products without SLS or other harsh detergents whenever possible. I don't have DH, but I do get itching and eczema.

Some good products to look for--ShiKai Shampoo and Conditioner, Kiss My Face Olive Oil Bar Soap, Jason Showersilk Liquid shower soap--those are free of SLS.

Other brands that are gluten-free--Softsoap, Purex Free and Clear (and regular) laundry detergent, All Free and Clear (and regular) laundry detergent.

Thanks for this! I am making sure everything is gluten-free in the house because my poor 2 yr old just got the celiac confirmation with dh! Im getting some free & clear tonight. ;)

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Thanks for this! I am making sure everything is gluten-free in the house because my poor 2 yr old just got the celiac confirmation with dh! Im getting some free & clear tonight. ;)

This post is over 5 years old.

You need to re- check all this info if its important to you as ingredients and products change.

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I know that there is a lot of people on here who will scream at me for saying this but here goes...

Unless you are eating the soap/shampoo/ect.. You can use whatever you want. DH is caused by antibodies getting attached to gluten proteins in the bloodstream via the digestive track (vie eating/drinking). After these antibodies attach themselves to the gluten protein, this "attachment" gets trapped in the smaller capillaries in the body (just below the skin surface. Thus, causing a herpetiformis rash.

The gluten protein MUST enter the bloodstream to cause this reaction. There are only 2 ways that this will happen!

1. put gluten into your stomach.

2. have a cut on your skin, and rub/pour/insert the gluten protein into it.

Unless you are dealing with open head wounds/ or skin tears on the body. The type of shampoo you use should not exacerbate any DH symptoms.

If you need some peer reviewed journals/studies on this topic. I will be happy to provide for you. Just send me an e-mail

Good Luck. Brizzo

I do not agree with you, Brizzo. Befoe my daughter was diagnosed with Celiac, she had these horrible sores on her skin and was very sick. Once she was diagnosed, we changed her diet and she became healthy, but still had these sores. As I did more research, I started taking out every shampoo, hair product, soap, laundry detergent, hand cream, make-up, etc that goes on her skin and contains gluten. Once I removed all of the things that get on the skin and contain gluten, the sores started to go away. Anytime she inadvertently uses a lotion or something that contains gluten, the sores reappear and when she stops the sores go away. I also know several others who have experienced the same thing. My daughter's Immunologist also agrees that the gluten is the culprit to her sores!

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Whew, this is quite a debate on here about using gluten-free skin products! I can absolutely ONLY use gluten-free lotions. If not, it's a nightmare. Knowing that makes me use gluten-free body wash just to be safe. I'm probably being overly paranoid but holy smokes it is so worth it in order to avoid a flare up! I get gluten-free body care products from Whole Foods. I buy the "Ëveryone" brand (it's cheap and lasts a long time). I just use regular shampoos and other stuff though without any problems.

Random, but one thing I have tried lately that REALLY soothes the itchies is straight organic Coconut Oil. I'm sure everyone on here already knows that but I'm a newbie and no DH peeps ever told me to try coconut oil so I want to pass that along in hopes I can help someone out! Also, I add apple cider vinegar to my bath when I sense a flare up coming on. It helps too :)

Brandiecane

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    • Hello, I see you posted this a long while ago, and perhaps--I hope-- it's no longer a matter of concern, but I thought I'd mention that shortly before I was diagnosed for celiac's, I had distinct yellow blotches on the corners of my eyelids toward my nose. Some months after I had stopped eating gluten, the yellow gradually went away, and--as it just reappeared now several years later, I googled the issue again.  I am only speculating here, but I do believe it is related to liver problems, which, in turn, are related to celiac's. I don't think liver function tests cover all aspects of liver health. I say this because when I was pregnant I developed a temporary liver condition called interhepatic colestasis of pregnancy (ICP), but my liver function tests had been fine. (The condition is diagnosed based on bile levels in the blood, not on liver function). I discovered upon some research that (of course!) ICP  can be associated with celiac's disease.  My hunch is this-- that celiac's presents two problems to the liver: 1) the malabsorption of nutrients--esp. Vit. K2-- that are vital liver health; 2) since gluten registers as a toxin to the immune system (I think?), perhaps the liver gets overloaded processing so much toxic material. Or perhaps there's some other reason. At any rate, poor liver health and celiac's do seem to be linked, according to a few articles I've found. Anyway, hope your problems are resolved now.  
    • my daughter did stool test from enterolab but this gluten sensitive blood test is from http://requestatest.com/tests/search    
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      Gluten Allergy is typically less severe than other Gluten related conditions like Celiac Disease.  People with Gluten Allergy will often experience abdominal discomfort, bloating, gas, constipation, or diarrhea when they eat products containing gluten.  These symptoms usually stop when a person cuts gluten out of their diet.

      A Gluten Allergy IgE test can be ordered to help determine if someone allergic to gluten.  This test can also be ordered when a person is testing for Celiac Disease and has had negative results on Celiac specific antibody tests.  An allergy test can also be ordered prior to Celiac testing to rule out Gluten Allergy as a likely cause for a person’s symptoms.
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