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Shampoos Detergents And Soap


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#16 hippiegirl2001

 
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Posted 15 July 2008 - 11:59 AM

looking for suggestions on detergents for laundering, shampoos, and soaps. my husband has DH and i don't know what to look for as far as chemicals and additives in these items. did purchase dove shampoo.

The suggestion on castile soap sounded good! It sounds as if you can use it for anything (laundry, bath, cleaning...) I saw 2 yesterday, one with Lavender, one with Peppermint. This was at Walgreens. I don't remember the ounces but it was large, for $14.99, and of course you dilute it so it probably last quite awhile. I think it was called Dr. Bonners.
I did buy a gluten free shampoo there at Walgreens, it is their brand. It is called Clean & Natural. Fragrance Free (no masking fragrance), no formaldehyde, parabens, lanolin, protein or dyes. States it is Gluten-free, alcohol-free and 100% vegan. Not tested on animals.
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#17 west coast natural

 
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Posted 26 July 2008 - 07:15 PM

looking for suggestions on detergents for laundering, shampoos, and soaps. my husband has DH and i don't know what to look for as far as chemicals and additives in these items. did purchase dove shampoo.



Just wanted to mention Mayo Clinic research indicates gluten cannot be absorbed through the skin, or cause DH through topical applications (it must be ingested to cause DH according to them) :) . Here is a link to the Mayo Clinic research on this topic for those who may be interested:

http://www.mayoclini...disease/AN01623
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#18 RoseTapper

 
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Posted 31 July 2008 - 07:07 PM

west coast natural,

Yes, this is the predominant thinking on the matter, but, again, no studies are cited. I think that it might be possible for gluten to be absorbed into the skin if it is part of a product that also contains squalane or some other oil that encourages absorption. With so many people who can attest to developing DH after using a product that contains gluten, it peeves me that the medical profession has not studied this matter more closely. People's experiences simply don't support the "official" medical stance that topically applied gluten can cause DH.
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#19 hippiegirl2001

 
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Posted 01 August 2008 - 07:42 AM

The suggestion on castile soap sounded good! It sounds as if you can use it for anything (laundry, bath, cleaning...) I saw 2 yesterday, one with Lavender, one with Peppermint. This was at Walgreens. I don't remember the ounces but it was large, for $14.99, and of course you dilute it so it probably last quite awhile. I think it was called Dr. Bonners.
I did buy a gluten free shampoo there at Walgreens, it is their brand. It is called Clean & Natural. Fragrance Free (no masking fragrance), no formaldehyde, parabens, lanolin, protein or dyes. States it is Gluten-free, alcohol-free and 100% vegan. Not tested on animals.



It is actually Dr. Bronners, (castille soap) and I bought a smaller one on sale at Henry's Farmer's Market to try. They had 4 or 5 scents there at Henry's, all with essential oils. I think that the Tea Tree oil one is supposed to help fight mold and mildew also. The castille soap is also cheaper at Trader Joes, although they only had Peppermint.
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#20 KristaleeJane

 
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Posted 01 August 2008 - 10:16 AM

I won't scream at you either but it is a known fact that:
"What goes on your skin will be absorbed into the bloodstream"
How do you explain the millions of people that get rashes welts and blisters after using lotions, shampoo and conditioners that contain gluten?
Why do doctors tell you differently, my doctor was very clear that I stay away from makeup, hair and body care products containing gluten?
There is an overwelming amount of people that do react to to gluten in products.
I know myself I break out and get very itchy from any products containing gluten.

But you are entitled to your own opinion...........
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#21 RoseTapper

 
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Posted 03 August 2008 - 11:00 AM

I would like to add that I also react to iodine when squalane or another transporting oil is combined with iodized salt. When such a mixture has been applied to my skin, the underlying tissues (muscles and tendons) feel as though they've been battered with a baseball bat. When a manicurist used an iodized salt mixture on my hands, I could barely move my fingers without tremendous pain, and the swelling and pain didn't subside for about six months. I have heard it said by healthcare professionals time and again, if you can't put it in your mouth, don't put it on your skin.

Someday I strongly believe that research will bear out the fact that gluten IS, in fact, absorbed into the bloodstream.
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#22 darlindeb25

 
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Posted 03 August 2008 - 12:07 PM

I have heard it said by healthcare professionals time and again, if you can't put it in your mouth, don't put it on your skin.

I have never heard that before, but I totally agree!

Someday I strongly believe that research will bear out the fact that gluten IS, in fact, absorbed into the bloodstream.

This very well could be. I know when I get gluten on my skin, I get hives, a burning sensation, sometimes itching. I do believe that shampoo, soaps, etc can get in your mouth while showering, and you can be glutened in that way.
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We urge all doctors to take time to listen to your patients.. don't "isolate" symptoms but look at the whole spectrum. If a patient tells you s/he feels as if s/he's falling apart and "nothing seems to be working properly", chances are s/he's right!

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#23 efb416

 
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Posted 13 January 2009 - 01:55 PM

Just wanted to mention Mayo Clinic research indicates gluten cannot be absorbed through the skin, or cause DH through topical applications (it must be ingested to cause DH according to them) :) . Here is a link to the Mayo Clinic research on this topic for those who may be interested:

http://www.mayoclini...disease/AN01623



I have read this information also. It appears there is a lot of conflicting information circulating in the medical environment. And I agree with many others that there must be more research done in the area. However, given that the cosmetics and body care industries have taken on adding vitamins and minerals into their products (makeup, soaps, shampoo, etc.) it would seem that there is in the very least the possibility for absorption into the skin and the bloodstream. I wish I remember where I read this, but apparently we may absorb up to 60% of what is applied topically (to the skin) into the bloodstream. And although we may not intentionally ingest our makeup, soaps/shampoos etc.. when bathing, we usually ingest trace amounts even if we keep our mouths closed in the shower! (This taken from instructions from Health Canada not to bathe in water contaminated with e-coli bacteria in some communities previously affected by the bacteria in Ontario). So it's a hard decision to make. How far do we take this. For me, having been very sick for a long time, I will take it as far as I can. But there are also people who are diagnosed with Celiac disease who choose to continue to consume gluten (I suppose they didn't experience severe symptoms). I just thought I should put it out there, because it seems to me that even some health care practitioners (including my family doctor) are not seeing parallels. I for one, did not think about clothing detergent and it's transition to my tea towels and food but I will check now. I currently use Sunlight - Unscented, Hypoallergenic liquid detergent but don't know it's gluten-free status.
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#24 Tallforagirl

 
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Posted 13 January 2009 - 02:41 PM

I know that there is a lot of people on here who will scream at me for saying this but here goes...

Unless you are eating the soap/shampoo/ect.. You can use whatever you want.

Unless you are dealing with open head wounds/ or skin tears on the body. The type of shampoo you use should not exacerbate any DH symptoms.

Good Luck. Brizzo


Brizzo, I'm with you on this one, however, I think what happens with some celiacs is that they also have a wheat allergy, which may mean lotions, shampoos etc with wheat protein irritate the skin.

For the rest of us, I would say if it's not causing a topical reaction, you don't need to stress (unless you think you'll swallow it). Obviously if your shampoo, lotion etc bothers your skin, then you need to find another product that doesn't bother you, but personally, I don't know how you could be certain that it's definitely the gluten rather than any other ingredient that's causing the irritation. It seems to me that if you've already got a skin rash, then lots of things could irritate it.
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#25 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 14 January 2009 - 02:54 AM

Brizzo, I'm with you on this one, however, I think what happens with some celiacs is that they also have a wheat allergy, which may mean lotions, shampoos etc with wheat protein irritate the skin.
For the rest of us, I would say if it's not causing a topical reaction, you don't need to stress (unless you think you'll swallow it). Obviously if your shampoo, lotion etc bothers your skin, then you need to find another product that doesn't bother you, but personally, I don't know how you could be certain that it's definitely the gluten rather than any other ingredient that's causing the irritation. It seems to me that if you've already got a skin rash, then lots of things could irritate it.


DH is NOT an allergic reaction it is an antibody reaction. A lot goes with it other than the rash and it is the antibody reaction that causes DH. For the antibodies to be activated it takes very very little gluten and once the antibody reaction begins then they begin a cascade through the body causing many symptoms other than the rash. That is how we know it is the gluten we are reacting to and not some other mysterious 'thing' in the ingredients.
An allergy to wheat protein is also possible but it is not the skin contact that gets us with the antibody reaction it is injestion of residual gluten left on the skin. I am glad you have no problem with topical glutens, or at least at this point you think you don't. But deeming DH and the antibody reaction we experience from it to be in actuality an allergic reaction is just plain wrong. If you choose to continue to use gluten based toiletries that is fine but many of us have found out the hard way that it is not safe for all.
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#26 Gemini

 
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Posted 14 January 2009 - 09:58 AM

brizzo,

I won't scream at you, but I do question your opinion on this matter. I started having a DH problem after being gluten free for over three years. After three months of sheer torture with my face covered with blisters, I finally contacted several gluten intolerance associations for help. They each advised me to check whether my shampoos, conditioners, makeups, detergents, etc., contained gluten. Lo and behold, the shampoo I'd been using for the past three months listed wheat germ in it. After discontinuing use of the shampoo, the DH resolved itself. And, no, I didn't ingest any shampoo....just in case you're thinking that. Of course, it's possible that it touched my lips, but it should have rinsed off just fine. That said, isn't gluten simply a nutrient like any other? I use a number of transdermal nutrient products because I have empaired ability to absorb fat-soluble vitamins. Since THEY are able to reach the cellular level, it makes sense that gluten does, too. However, without studies on this particular matter, there's a lot of misinformation--in my opinion--so I have to go with my own personal experiences.


Rose Tapper....brizzo is 100% correct with the information given. Even people with DH can handle gluten and that will not cause a reaction that is Celiac related.
This is a big point of confusion for people. If a person reacts to a lotion or shampoo topically, then they most likely have an ALLERGY to an ingredient and that ingredient could very well be wheat. It is very possible to have both Celiac/DH and a wheat allergy. Otherwise, you would have to drink the shampoo to cause
an internal reaction.

The other issue is that gluten cannot be absorbed through the skin, period. Molecule is too large for passage. It could enter the bloodstream, as brizzo stated, through an open wound but I am still not sure whether that would be a problem either as gluten HAS TO get into the GI tract for a reaction to occur. It is safe to use intravenous meds with gluten so I have my doubts about the other. Allergies are a different animal with a different reaction process, even though the symptoms can be the same. The reason your vitamins can be absorbed through the skin is because they are formulated that way by the manufacturer, otherwise, they wouldn't be absorbed. Gluten can only reach cellular levels by eating it or breathing it in as whatever you breathe in may make it's way into your gut.

The reason doctors may advise a patient to stay away from all gluten can be because they themselves are not up-to-date on correct information or those that are figure the majority of the public, with little to no medical background or training, will have difficulty processing all the required information to get the diet right so tell them to avoid all gluten to make it easier and ensure compliance. The best thing any Celiac can do is to learn as much as possible, with the correct information, so they will not make the mistake of thinking they cannot touch any gluten without a DH reaction. Dr. Peter Green's book is an excellent way to start.
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#27 Happy Holly

 
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Posted 19 January 2009 - 08:51 AM

DO NOT use the "Tide 7 signs". I tried it and loved it for my laundry, but began breaking out all over my arms, back and stomach. It is very unfriendly to DH.
I can, however, use the other Tide products. I use the one in the white bottle -- no dyes, no perfumes, no worries.
Good luck. :)

looking for suggestions on detergents for laundering, shampoos, and soaps. my husband has DH and i don't know what to look for as far as chemicals and additives in these items. did purchase dove shampoo.


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#28 Leonesse

 
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Posted 09 February 2009 - 12:06 PM

Best shampoo I have found: Desert Essence Organics. I like the red raspberry variety of the shampoo as it really does make my hair shine. Cleans well and smells good. I got it at Whole Foods. It says on the label it is 100% Vegan, gluten and wheat free, has no parabens, sodium lauryl or laureth sulfates, no phthalates, artificial fragrances or colors, no silicone, EDTA, glycol, or petroleum based ingredients. Cruelty Free: no animal testing. No phosphates. Biodegradable.

As for whether gluten on the skin goes internal, in my experience the reaction to it can, even if the molecule "can't". I've had it happen several times, getting a definitely gluten reaction from various "external" products such as shampoos. My main gluten reaction is mental confusion, dazedness, ADD, and short term memory problems, not a skin reaction at all, and this is what happens in reaction to some shampoos and soaps. My brain is being affected enough to make me search out the culprit, and it is the gluten-containing products. My skull-encased brain seems pretty internal to me! If it is "only" an allergic reaction, it's certainly one I have to pay attention to and prevent. I am not classed as a true celiac, though I do have ulcerative colitis.

Think about the trans-dermal hormone patches and nicotine patches doctors devised and use... if chemicals didn't absorb through the skin layer, those treatments shouldn't work at all. No cut in the skin is necessary for them to work, either. Even if the gluten molecule is too big to go through whole, I'm guessing the capillaries must contact it, or pieces of it, enough to set off the internal chain reaction of biological freak-out. I may have doubts about the bio-medical aspects of this, but I have no doubts about my experiences and will go by what I have found true in my case.
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#29 sandiz

 
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Posted 16 February 2010 - 06:21 PM

I know that there is a lot of people on here who will scream at me for saying this but here goes...

Unless you are eating the soap/shampoo/ect.. You can use whatever you want. DH is caused by antibodies getting attached to gluten proteins in the bloodstream via the digestive track (vie eating/drinking). After these antibodies attach themselves to the gluten protein, this "attachment" gets trapped in the smaller capillaries in the body (just below the skin surface. Thus, causing a herpetiformis rash.

The gluten protein MUST enter the bloodstream to cause this reaction. There are only 2 ways that this will happen!
1. put gluten into your stomach.
2. have a cut on your skin, and rub/pour/insert the gluten protein into it.

Unless you are dealing with open head wounds/ or skin tears on the body. The type of shampoo you use should not exacerbate any DH symptoms.

If you need some peer reviewed journals/studies on this topic. I will be happy to provide for you. Just send me an e-mail

Good Luck. Brizzo

I beg to differ with you. For years I have thought that I was allergy to different soaps, turns out I am allergy to the wheat. Now I am finding out that even things that have wheat in it effect me. Unless you have this problem I feel you should not come down on us who do.
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#30 srsssss

 
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Posted 23 March 2010 - 10:54 AM

I use joico shampoo and conditioner www.joico.com they emailed me a list of their gluten-free products and indicate that their vitamin E is synthetic.

Also recommended from my derm I use Vanicream and free and clear. You can get it at some drugstores or order it online. They have shampoo, conditioner, sunscreen, lotion, lipbalm, shaving cream, soap, skin cleanser etc..

http://www.psico.com/
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