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Help! Roux(flour & Oil) Gluten Free
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I just had a cutastrufy in my kitchen. My roux carmalized on me and stuck to eveything. Does anyone know what kind of flour I should use to make a roux? Any help is appreciated!

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I would try potato or corn.

What did you use?

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Do you have any flour mixes? Those generally work better than any one flour by itself. Although if it carmelized, it sounds like it cooked too long/fast. Have you made a roux before with "normal" flour? If not, it does take patience (which is why I don't make them very often :D ) Also, when you have the time (meaning you don't need an emergency fix) I would get some flour from Tom Sawyer-I have found it to be a pretty good cup for cup replacement for white wheat flour in many recipes-especially sauces, rouxes and gravies.

Depending on what you are making it for, there are other options that don't require flour (I'm thinking of a wine reduction or white sauce).

Not much help I'm afraid, but I will wish you luck-both in making roux and getting the carmelized one out of the pan :unsure:

-Cathy

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I use potato starch, and it works just fine :)

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Unfortunatley I am very new gluten free cooking and I have never made a roux before. I also do not have my flours labled very well. I accidently used tapioca starch. I'm not fond of the taste of potato flour, but I never thought about corn. Where can I get that Tom Sawyer flour? Or do you know of any flour combos I could use. Thank you so much for both of your advices!

Amy

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White rice or sweet rice flour work great for making a roux.

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Tom Sawyer flour is at: glutenfreeflour.com

A true, good roux isn't easy regardless of the flour-so don't give up! Just try a lower heat and stir constantly. If you don't like the taste of potato starch try either corn starch only or a mixture of equal parts corn starch and potato starch. If that doesn't work PM me and let me know what flours you do have and I'll look and see if any of the flour mixture recipes I have fits what you already have.

-Cathy B)

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I was curious how many different roux recipes there are out there (since mine is rattling around in my head) so I googled it. And I found this one that I am now excited to try as it is done in the microwave, so it will require much less patience on my part :D (always a plus with my personality). Anyway, I would assume that it is harder to burn also.

Microwave Cajun Roux Recipe

Louisiana Cajun Gravy used as a base for Seafood, Chicken, Sausage, or the kitchen chair (shaved, joke) served over rice.

by George Montero

10 servings

15 min 3 min prep

2/3 cup vegetable oil

2/3 cup all-purpose flour

1 medium onion (Chopped)

1 medium green bell pepper (chopped)

2 stalks celery (chopped)

1 bunch green onions (chopped, tops only)

4 cloves garlic (chopped)

Mix flour and oil together in a 4 cup GLASS measuring bowl with a whisk until smooth.

Important to whisk smooth before putting in the microwave oven.

Cook on HIGH power (100%) 7 minutes, stir and whisk at 4 minutes and again every 30 seconds until you achieve a dark caramel color.

Don't burn the roux!

Please be careful the glass bowl will be extremely HOT.

Carefully add the onions, bell pepper, and celery to the hot roux.

It will sizzle and the aroma will be fantastic.

Mix well and cook 3 minutes on HIGH.

Add the green onions and garlic to the glass bowl.

Cook 2 more minutes on HIGH.

Additional notes:If you have ever made roux the conventional way, you know it must be watched constantly or it will burn.

The first step, oil/flour cook on high 7 minutes, when your timer shows 4 minutes remove the glass bowl from the microwave and stir/whisk.

Put the bowl back in the oven and continue to cook, however, take the bowl out every 30 seconds and stir/whisk as the roux begins to thicken.

When the roux is medium to dark caramel color I like to take the bowl out of the oven and stir/whisk, the roux will continue to darken and you will have less chance of burning your roux.

Depending on the powers (watts) of your microwave oven (700 to 1000 watts) the roux could start to thicken and brown at 5- 9 minutes.

Attempt to get the color you like, Med, Dark Med, or Dark.

The next 2 stages (3 minutes for the tough vegetables, then 2 more minutes for the tender vegetables).

You really don't have to stir while the vegetables saute, however, you do stir when you first add them to the roux then forget it!

Congratulations!

You have now made authenic Cajun Roux in your microwave Oven.

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I use Bob's Red Mill All Purpose gluten-free Flour. It works perfectly. Use it in the same measurements you did regular flour. I make all sorts of gravy and even bechamel / cheese sauces with it for mac and cheese and to go over veggies.

Nancy

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I often use corn starch.

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Thanks for all of your advise. I was trying one of Emeril's recipes that turned into a stew tonight. I will have to try again. Thanks Again!

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I just bought "Cajun and Southern Gluten-Free Delights" by Aileen M. Bennett. They live in south Mississippi and this cookbook looks like it has several good recipes. For the shrimp gumbo recipe, she uses 1/2 cup brown rice flour and 1/4 to 1/2 cup oil. Her chicken gumbo recipe calls for 5 Tablespoons brown rice flour, 1 Tablespoon cornstarch and 5 to 6 Tablespoons oil. I'm going to make some gumbo this weekend and will let you know how the roux turned out.

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I usually use plain rice flour, or a mixture of 1/2 rice and 1/2 corn starch or tapioca flour. Either seems to work just fine, in fact I think it thickens up faster than a flour-based roux.

A roux with 3 tbsp rice flour, 3 tbsp cream cheese and 1 3/4 cups milk seasoned with salt and some mushroom chuncks makes a reasonable substitute for condensed cream of mushroom soup, too. You can't melt the cream cheese like you would butter, so I just warm it up a little and throw everything but the mushrooms in and stir till thick, then add the mushrooms. :)

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