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Psylium Seed Husk

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I would like to find something that I can take that will help "bulk" me up... The immodium is helping somewhat but I am still loose.... A long time ago, before diagnosis, I used to take psylium seed husk. Is it from a grain that is forbidden? Is it gluten free?

Thanks for any help!



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I am cutting and pasting a article I found. Hopefully this helps you.

By Pat Kendall, Ph.D., R.D.

Food Science and Human Nutrition Specialist

Colorado State University Cooperative Extension

June 10, 1998

Are you contemplating eating oatmeal for breakfast to get cholesterol-lowering benefits? Well, there's a new kid on the block, psyllium. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently granted approval for manufacturers of products that contain the soluble fiber found in psyllium seed husk to put heart-healthy claims on their labels.

Psyllium, a plant primarily cultivated in India, is known as blond or Indian psyllium. Its seeds are rich in soluble fiber extracted from the dried seed husks. Grandma was onto something when she chided "eat your roughage". It's that roughage, found exclusively in plant foods, that plays an important role in health.

Fiber comes in both soluble and insoluble forms. Besides psyllium, other foods rich in soluble fibers include oats, citrus fruits, barley, apples and dried beans. Those high in insoluble fibers include wheat bran, the skins of fruits and vegetables, beans, berries and seeds. Both types promote laxation and increase bulk.

Besides laxation, soluble fiber has been studied extensively for its role in reducing blood cholesterol levels. This type of fiber has the ability to bind with bile acids. Bile acid, an important player in the digestion of fats, is made in our body from cholesterol. When bile acids are bound to fiber, they are excreted and demand that more cholesterol be converted to bile acids. This process lowers circulating blood cholesterol levels. The effect may be subtle, but even a small drop in blood cholesterol levels has shown to protect against heart disease.

Studies of oats were the first to show a definitive relationship between a specific food and reduced cholesterol levels. In 1997, the FDA allowed products that contain whole oats or soluble fiber from oats to make health claims on product labels about the association between oats and reduced heart disease risk. Since then, results from several well-controlled studies of psyllium seed husk have persuaded the FDA to add it to the list of cholesterol-lowering soluble fibers. The studies evaluated a daily intake of 10 grams of psyllium seed husk, equivalent to 7 grams of soluble fiber, among test subjects consuming a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol. Results showed significantly lower total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels among those ingesting the psyllium.

Watch for new product labels to hit markets soon. Claims will read: "The soluble fiber from psyllium seed husk in this product, as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol, may reduce the risk of heart disease." Only products that contain 1.7 grams of soluble fiber from psyllium seed husk per serving can carry the health claim on its label. Four servings of such a product throughout the day would equal the 7 grams of soluble fiber used in the studies. Currently, psyllium seed husk is found in Kellogg's Bran Buds cereal and in a variety of dietary supplements promoted for increased fiber intake and as aids for weight loss.

Because some foods that contain phylum seed husk can be difficult to swallow, foods carrying the claim may also need to carry a label advising to consume the food with adequate amounts of liquid and avoid eating the food if one has difficulty swallowing.

For more information, contact your local Colorado State University Cooperative Extension office.

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Updated Wednesday, June 09, 2004



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    • They didn't. The labs were run two and a half weeks ago and before I got confirmation on here that it should be done despite my drs saying otherwise. I was glutened the week prior anyway so it would've been high regardless.  It's all very frustrating. So I guess I'll wait five or six months and go back and demand it vs asking about it. 
    • Did they run a DGP IGA?  While your DGP can take over a year to come down, I still think you should be getting tested every six months until you see a downward trend.  I am not making that up.  Google it.   My DGP was off the charts when I was glutened last summer.  My symtoms were severe, yet at diagnosis, I just had anemia.  It took six months for all symptoms to completely resolve (rashes and hives took the longest and three month to regain dairy).  What I am saying is that symptoms for celiac disease can change.    
    • Long pause because I wanted my latest lab results and they took forever.  Cortisol, ACTH, estadiol, vitamin a and whatever else were all fine. They are retesting my thyroid in four weeks. I definitely bought the wrong product and glutened myself a few weeks back so I guess that has to wait which really irritates me. My gliadin iga ab was greater than 100 almost two yrs ago at diagnosis so I guess sometime next yr I'll redo that and hope it's down :-/. Trying to do all the right things and get bad information from doctors.  Thanks for all the info you've shared and helped me with. I've had lab work every month since May and will next month for the thyroid again. Sigh. 
    • Hi Carle, Congrats on your symptoms going away.  I did seem to have reactions to rice for a while after going gluten-free.  But after some years on the gluten-free diet I can eat it again.  So reactions can change over time. I was searching for an article on gluten in common store products, but didn't find it.  There was a group that did testing on some common grocery products like beans, rice, corn etc that we would normally consider to be gluten-free naturally.  But they found some level of gluten in some of them.  So it's not impossible to pick up something off the shelf that ought to be naturally gluten-free and find it is contaminated.  That may have happened with the rice you ate.  A quick rinse of water before using the rice might help.
    • Hi Doit, The reference ranges to the right of the test result show the values the result ought to be in for normal readings (no celiac disease).  Your results appear to show no higher than normal results that I can see. However, you aren't following the recommended process for celiac disease blood testing.  The blood test is supposed to preceded by 12 weeks of daily gluten eating.  That is generally enough time to cause a sufficient quantity of antibodies to build up in the blood stream to be detectable by the tests. Not having antibodies in the blood stream doesn't mean you aren't being damaged.  People with DH (dermatitis herpetiformis) sometimes test negative on the standard blood tests.  My theory is possibly because the antibodies are concentrated in the skin instead of the blood.  In gut damage, it is possible the antibodies are concentrated in the gut, instead of the blood.  After some time they show up in the blood also.  The thinking is the antibodies go where the work is.  Anyway, theories aside, it takes very little gluten to kick off an immune response.  Those antibodies are not aimless soldiers.  They start doing their work and destroying gluten and gut tissue even if you don't feel symptoms.  Did you know there are some people who have no GI symptoms of celiac disease but still have it?  They call that silent celiac.  So going by symptoms is not a good way to judge actual damage in the gut. You are wise to go in for followup testing, but the followup testing is hopefully to show compliance with the gluten-free diet, and lower antibody test results.  Have your close family members been tested for celiac disease?  It sounds like they should be.   There is a 5% higher chance of them having celiac than the general population. Welcome to the forum!
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