Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

Psylium Seed Husk
0

2 posts in this topic

I would like to find something that I can take that will help "bulk" me up... The immodium is helping somewhat but I am still loose.... A long time ago, before diagnosis, I used to take psylium seed husk. Is it from a grain that is forbidden? Is it gluten free?

Thanks for any help!

Karen

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

I am cutting and pasting a article I found. Hopefully this helps you.

By Pat Kendall, Ph.D., R.D.

Food Science and Human Nutrition Specialist

Colorado State University Cooperative Extension

June 10, 1998

Are you contemplating eating oatmeal for breakfast to get cholesterol-lowering benefits? Well, there's a new kid on the block, psyllium. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently granted approval for manufacturers of products that contain the soluble fiber found in psyllium seed husk to put heart-healthy claims on their labels.

Psyllium, a plant primarily cultivated in India, is known as blond or Indian psyllium. Its seeds are rich in soluble fiber extracted from the dried seed husks. Grandma was onto something when she chided "eat your roughage". It's that roughage, found exclusively in plant foods, that plays an important role in health.

Fiber comes in both soluble and insoluble forms. Besides psyllium, other foods rich in soluble fibers include oats, citrus fruits, barley, apples and dried beans. Those high in insoluble fibers include wheat bran, the skins of fruits and vegetables, beans, berries and seeds. Both types promote laxation and increase bulk.

Besides laxation, soluble fiber has been studied extensively for its role in reducing blood cholesterol levels. This type of fiber has the ability to bind with bile acids. Bile acid, an important player in the digestion of fats, is made in our body from cholesterol. When bile acids are bound to fiber, they are excreted and demand that more cholesterol be converted to bile acids. This process lowers circulating blood cholesterol levels. The effect may be subtle, but even a small drop in blood cholesterol levels has shown to protect against heart disease.

Studies of oats were the first to show a definitive relationship between a specific food and reduced cholesterol levels. In 1997, the FDA allowed products that contain whole oats or soluble fiber from oats to make health claims on product labels about the association between oats and reduced heart disease risk. Since then, results from several well-controlled studies of psyllium seed husk have persuaded the FDA to add it to the list of cholesterol-lowering soluble fibers. The studies evaluated a daily intake of 10 grams of psyllium seed husk, equivalent to 7 grams of soluble fiber, among test subjects consuming a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol. Results showed significantly lower total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels among those ingesting the psyllium.

Watch for new product labels to hit markets soon. Claims will read: "The soluble fiber from psyllium seed husk in this product, as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol, may reduce the risk of heart disease." Only products that contain 1.7 grams of soluble fiber from psyllium seed husk per serving can carry the health claim on its label. Four servings of such a product throughout the day would equal the 7 grams of soluble fiber used in the studies. Currently, psyllium seed husk is found in Kellogg's Bran Buds cereal and in a variety of dietary supplements promoted for increased fiber intake and as aids for weight loss.

Because some foods that contain phylum seed husk can be difficult to swallow, foods carrying the claim may also need to carry a label advising to consume the food with adequate amounts of liquid and avoid eating the food if one has difficulty swallowing.

For more information, contact your local Colorado State University Cooperative Extension office.

Go to top of this page.

Updated Wednesday, June 09, 2004

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      104,332
    • Total Posts
      920,431
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • I would like to ask if anyone has eaten puffed rice from Arrowhead Mills.  My daughter, who has celiac, wants to eat it and I am looking for advice.  The only ingredient is rice, but they do not test the product so do not label it gluten free.  I called the company and they say they clean all their equipment between each product, but since they don't test it cannot label it as gluten free.  Would you allow your daughter to eat this product?
    • He might have celiac disease (or just the start of it).  He might have Non-celiac Gluten Intolerance, which is real, but there is not a test for it.  He might have other food intolerances (milk, dyes, etc.).  You have been to an allergist and he did not positive for allergies (I assume wheat was included in the panel.).  Trialing a diet is fine, even a gluten free diet, when you ruled out everything.  But you have that quirky TTG result.  I gave you the link from the MayoClinic (top notch) and their algorithm recommends further evaluation.  An allergist is not a celiac expert nor is primary care doctor.  You should get a referral to a Ped GI.  If she/he suggests a gluten-free diet, then fine.  Because if he improves then, the GI will give you a diagnosis.  By the time you see the GI, he might have ordered another round of celiac blood tests, genetic tests, or he might want to order an endoscopy.  This case is not clear and that is a bummer.   The cure is the diet.  But he will be going to school and a diagnosis will pave the way for accommodations all the way to college.  And anyone here will tell you that once you get off gluten (and that is the root cause), it is awful....horrific... to go back on it for further testing.   This is his life and yours.  You must do what is best for your family.  I wish you well and we are here to support you.  I care.  I am mom.  
    • This just published: Highlights   • Kernel-based gluten contamination in oats skews gluten analysis results. • Grinding inadequately disperses gluten to allow a single accurate analysis. • Lognormal distribution of the test results renders a single test unrepresentative.   Abstract Oats are easily contaminated with gluten-rich kernels of wheat, rye and barley. These contaminants are like gluten ‘pills’, shown here to skew gluten analysis results. Using R-Biopharm R5 ELISA, we quantified gluten in gluten-free oatmeal servings from an in-market survey. For samples with a 5–20 ppm reading on a first test, replicate analyses provided results ranging <5 ppm to >160 ppm. This suggests sample grinding may inadequately disperse gluten to allow a single accurate gluten assessment. To ascertain this, and characterize the distribution of 0.25-g gluten test results for kernel contaminated oats, twelve 50 g samples of pure oats, each spiked with a wheat kernel, showed that 0.25 g test results followed log-normal-like distributions. With this, we estimate probabilities of mis-assessment for a ‘single measure/sample’ relative to the <20 ppm regulatory threshold, and derive an equation relating the probability of mis-assessment to sample average gluten content.   The full article can be accessed at Gluten Free Watchdog if are a subscriber.
    • If I may say something right now, the suggestions, advice, and information provided to you in this forum is just that: suggestions, advice, and information.  What has been provided can be used as tools to help figure out what is going on.  Please don't go away disgruntled or too frustrated.  There have been times myself when advice and suggestions was given to me, and I was not sure what to do about all the information.  I had to think and pray on it before I could act on it because my brain was functioning enough to do something about it right away.  It was on survival mode.  Forgive me if I am wrong, but I believe this is where you are at right now.  You are not sure where to go or what to do, so your body is just doing what it can to function day in, day out.  If this assumption is correct, I GET IT!  It is not fun, neither is it easy. Don't give up.  Things will get better.  Take all of this information and go to your primary doctor to see if you both can put your heads together and figure this out.  The answer may not come right away, but be patient.  it could be everything coming at you at once that making your body go into hypersentive mode.  I don't know, because I am not in your situation.  Until you go to the doctor, do what you know to do and God will take care of the rest.  There is something that has kept me sane through this past year: It will be okay because God is in control.  He knows what is happening to you and your future is going to be.  When you have a good day, enjoy those moments.  When you have a bad day, bring back to memory those good days and see if you can do something for another person.  I have found this year that if I focus on someone else through the bad times especially things don't seem as grim. I will be praying for you.
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      61,387
    • Most Online
      1,763

    Newest Member
    Jaimesmile
    Joined