Get email alerts Get E-mail Alerts Sponsor: Sponsor:

Ads by Google:

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE email alerts

No Milk, No Yogurt, But Cheddar Cheese Ok?

3 posts in this topic


Hi All,

This question is probably answered somewhere else, but after reading through a few threads, I'll just ask again. My IGG allergy test came back to say I am allergic to milk, yogurt, cottage cheese, whey and mozarella, but not to cheddar cheese. Since cheddar seems to me to be the same ingredients but with added rennet and then aged, does it mean that the lactose is used up in the process and that casein is OK for me? The reason I am asking you all and not the testing lab (Optimum Health Resource - very bad choice, see my thread under Pre-testing for that saga) is because I am not getting the information I need from them to complete the picture. I am also retesting with another lab this week just to make sure of these results.

So, what do you think?

I also tested allergic to eggs - now that has thrown me for a loop and I am mulling that over today. I made pumpkin pie without the crust yesterday using ground flaxseed and water as the egg replacement, it's OK, I guess. Certainly not as smooth.


Share this post

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ads by Google:

The allergy test you had would not test for lactose's a different reaction in the body. If it were just lactose intolerance, then yogurt would likely be okay for you as well as the cheddar cheese since the bacteria consume the lactose. I'm lactose intolerant myself and have no problems with yogurt or hard cheeses such as cheddar.

In terms of cheese/dairy allergy, I'd be surprised if you were allergic to dairy but not to cheddar cheese, especially since cheddar cheese produces histamine so can cause a reaction in absence of a true dairy allergy (cheddar cheese used to make my mouth itchy just like with my other oral allergies).

The IgG allergy testing is a bit controversial, and from what I have read, can produce false positives. From what I understand, the body produces IgG in response to exposure to foods/proteins but does not necessarily correlate with allergy. There all all sorts of conflicting info out there about various allergy testing methods...of course there are those that believe in it and those that say it's a bunch of bunk. Gotta take what works for you, and ignore the rest. :)

I'm beginning to think that the best way is to do a thorough elimination test on one's own, and carefully document any and all reactions: physical & emotional.



Share this post

Link to post
Share on other sites

Most aged cheeses, like cheddar are lactose-free. You should probably try an elimination test to determine if you are casein or lactose intolerant. If you can handle cheese, but not milk, you are most likely lactose intolerant.


Share this post

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
    • Total Posts
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • It really can be anywhere or any random source, Few tips, as mentioned eat whole foods only nothing processed, Use Freezer paper on your prep surfaces to fix your foods, perhaps gloves in case your touching something else (door to fridge, pantry, computer keyboard, etc) that might have trace gluten residue. Have dedicated gluten-free cooking utensils, pots, and pans. Check your soaps, shampoos, make up and other hygiene products, these might also contain gluten that could be cross contaminating.  I personally had this exact issue and broke down sold everything I had and started new in a new apartment, new appliances, new everything since I was getting sick at least twice a week and could not hold a job. I will link you to the list of gluten ingredients to look out for. Hopefully you can find the cause and not have to go as radical as I did to get relief. It might be something as simple as a spice, or a random product in you house.
    • Thanks for your replies...!  Thanks for all the tips, I am indeed on a caveman diet and trying to figure out what works best. I had rice on Friday and unfortunately did get a reaction (bloating/nervousness), which for now makes carbs a thing of the past. I do indeed do very well on protein and am becoming picky about the ingredients in foods as well. For example I had asparagus the other day but they were packed in citric acid. Little did I know citric acid had sugar. Suffered a severe reaction. All-natural indeed is the only way to go when it comes to curing this thing..  Well, it's a valuable lesson. I never drank enough during my childhood but I'm trying to drink at least a bottle nowadays. It probably contributed to my gut issues.  I'll do my best and see how it goes.  Thanks again, Ken
    • I was in Zambia, Zimbabwe, Botswana & South Africa this summer, with very few problems.  I brought a ton of Kind bars, Justin's peanut butter packets and Costco beef jerky just in case!  I get the Kind Bars and Justin's on Amazon Prime.  Africans eat a lot of meat (try the Kudu, it's awesome!) and veggies.  Stay away from sauces.  I don't recommend eating the Mopane tree worms, even though they are gluten-free.  I tried to get out of it, but my tour leader said they were gluten-free and I had to try it as part of the experience....ewwwww!  lol  gluten-free is quite popular in South Africa...they call in the Banting diet.  Maybe they know it up north as well?  I would definitely stay away from chips because you have no idea what else has been in the same fryer oil.  One chicken nugget and you're toast.  I've never had a problem with rice.  Have a great trip...Africa is amazing!  
    • Hi Jan, Have you had any allergy testing? Could be you are allergic to something else. My daughter is Celiac and was still getting ill & feeling awful after going gluten-free. Found out through several blood tests that she is allergic to shrimp, wheat, yeast & sesame seeds. Many GlutenFree foods contain the things she is allergic too so her food choices just had to change. But she was recently diagnosed with EoE from her lastest endoscopy after being  sick with horrible acid.  Go have more testing with a GI doctor that is current with celiac disease and it's many different symptoms. Knowledge is a powerful weapon and you need to try and stay positive. You have many people who you can turn to and a big Celiac family that is always ready to listen & help where they can! Welcome to the forum 👍🏻
    • Hi Janst, It might help to simplify your diet.  Eliminate possibilities of gluten sneaking into your diet.  It's pretty easy to make mistakes with your diet when transitioning to gluten-free eating.  I suggest eating only whole foods for a 6 month period until you get used to things.  Cross contamination is another thing to look out for.  Shared peanut butter, butter, or other condiments can spread gluten in small amounts and make us sick.  Sometimes medicines or vitamins can have gluten, even teas and spices are possibilities.  Kissing a person who has eaten gluten recently can cause problems too. Keep trying because every time you make a mistake you learn something. You might want to try stopping all dairy for a while to see if that helps also. And welcome to the forum
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

    There are no registered users currently online

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
    • Most Online

    Newest Member