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Xanthan Gum, Soy Lecithin, Citric Acid


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#1 Guest_Kathy Ann_*

 
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Posted 16 October 2006 - 08:55 PM

I have allergies to corn and soy along with everything else. Does anyone know if a person can usually tolerate ingredients like xanthan gum, soy lecithin and citric acid since they are so refined and processed? Every time I attempt to buy something prepackaged, invariably it will have at least one of those items on the list and I have been putting it back on the shelf.
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#2 AndreaB

 
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Posted 16 October 2006 - 09:57 PM

This is an excerpt from an article I saved over to my computer.

Extracted from Nexus Magazine, Volume 11, Number 5 (August-September 2004)
PO Box 30, Mapleton Qld 4560 Australia. editor@nexusmagazine.com
Telephone: +61 (0)7 5442 9280; Fax: +61 (0)7 5442 9381
From our web page at: www.nexusmagazine.com
by Kaayla T. Daniel, PhD, CCN © 2004
From Chapter 23 of her book
The Whole Soy Story: The Dark Side of America's Favorite Health Food
(NewTrends Publishing, 2004)
Website: http://www.wholesoystory.com

The Kunitz trypsin inhibitor has been identified as one of three allergic components in soy lecithin—a soy product often considered hypoallergenic (i.e., it has diminished potential for causing an allergic reaction) because it is not supposed to include any soy protein, but invariably contains trace amounts.39
Soybean lectin—another antinutrient now promoted as a disease preventer—has also been identified as an allergen.40 Whenever there is a damaged intestinal lining or "leaky gut", soy lectins can easily pass into the bloodstream, triggering allergic reactions (see chapter 14). Indeed, this is very likely because both soy allergens and saponins (an antinutrient discussed in chapter 15) can damage the intestines.


I'm not sure about xanthan gum....is that corn derived?

Citric Acid is corn derived and a source of hidden msg.

Whether they are safe depends on your intolerances. I'm intolerant to soy and avoid all forms of it.
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Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.


#3 Guest_Kathy Ann_*

 
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Posted 17 October 2006 - 08:34 AM

Thanks! Yes, xanthan gum has something to do with corn. It's grown on it, I think. My doctor wanted me to take phosphatidyl choline from soy lecithin and soy lecithin seems to be in nearly every food I look at, as well.
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#4 Simply_V

 
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Posted 17 October 2006 - 03:40 PM

I have allergies to corn and soy along with everything else. Does anyone know if a person can usually tolerate ingredients like xanthan gum, soy lecithin and citric acid since they are so refined and processed? Every time I attempt to buy something prepackaged, invariably it will have at least one of those items on the list and I have been putting it back on the shelf.


I have allergies to corn and friends who have allergies to soy. None of these are safe.

Xanthan Gum - is grown on corn/corn sugars. It is supposed to be processed so much that no corn is left, yet many people react to it.

Citric acid: This is made from corn. Despite its processing corn protiens are still present. It is a huge problem.

Soy Lecithin - Every soy allergic person I have talked to reacts to this. So I'd advise you against it.

Another problematic ingredient for severe and sensitive corn allergic: Ethyl Alcohols (used in vanilla, vanillin, and natural and artificial flavorings).
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V
Severe airborne allergies since childhood. Was on constant antihisamines with behavior issues. Digestion issues started noticably around 1985.
1992 IBS diagnosis.
2004 Corn allergy - through diet discovery.
2005 RAST negative to all food allergies. High cholesterol diagnosed as PCOS.
2006 Immunolabs ELISA and IgE assay:
IgE to Corn, Milk, Eggs, & White Bean.
IgG to peppers, blk/wt pepper, beans, almonds, yeasts.
Neg. to Celiac, gluten, etc. High IgA level.
2008 No longer considered as having PCOS, or associated risks.

Currently avoiding corn, eggs, cow & goat milk, all beans (cept some soy derivatives & peanut oil), cruciferous veggies, onions/garlic, carrots/celery, anything bilberry/cranberry/blueberry, peppers, and anything remotely corn derived, corntaminated.

Currently off all allergy medications for airborne allergies and breathing fine.

#5 Guest_Kathy Ann_*

 
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Posted 17 October 2006 - 06:44 PM

Where can I buy a safe natural vanilla extract? Frontier Natural Products sells one called bourbon vanilla. Would that qualify as safe?
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#6 Simply_V

 
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Posted 17 October 2006 - 11:37 PM

Where can I buy a safe natural vanilla extract? Frontier Natural Products sells one called bourbon vanilla. Would that qualify as safe?


I don't believe the Bourbon one is safe.. Frontier makes an alcohol-free vanilla which I believe is still safe. Its pretty expensive so I've just gotten to make my own.

2 cups Vodka (potato vodka - Luksusowa) and 2 vanilla beans - let sit 4-6 weeks before use.

Btw the homemade vanilla makes a pretty good vodka on ice drink.
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V
Severe airborne allergies since childhood. Was on constant antihisamines with behavior issues. Digestion issues started noticably around 1985.
1992 IBS diagnosis.
2004 Corn allergy - through diet discovery.
2005 RAST negative to all food allergies. High cholesterol diagnosed as PCOS.
2006 Immunolabs ELISA and IgE assay:
IgE to Corn, Milk, Eggs, & White Bean.
IgG to peppers, blk/wt pepper, beans, almonds, yeasts.
Neg. to Celiac, gluten, etc. High IgA level.
2008 No longer considered as having PCOS, or associated risks.

Currently avoiding corn, eggs, cow & goat milk, all beans (cept some soy derivatives & peanut oil), cruciferous veggies, onions/garlic, carrots/celery, anything bilberry/cranberry/blueberry, peppers, and anything remotely corn derived, corntaminated.

Currently off all allergy medications for airborne allergies and breathing fine.

#7 AndreaB

 
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Posted 18 October 2006 - 08:16 AM

Wild Oats sell the regular alcohol free vanilla for $9.99 last I knew. I stocked up on it when it dropped to that price. Was $14.99 before that. It has been $9.99 for 6 monthe to a year.
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Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.


#8 Guest_Kathy Ann_*

 
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Posted 18 October 2006 - 02:06 PM

Thanks for all the great info everyone! I think I'll steer clear from all of them, just in case.

By the way, do you split those vanilla beans to make it more potent? I don't usually buy much liquor. If I can't find that brand, does it state "from potatoes" on bottles, or do you just have to know that? I appreciate the recipe. I made vanilla 25 years ago, but used bourbon. Thanks for reminding me that I can make my own. :)
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#9 Simply_V

 
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Posted 18 October 2006 - 02:15 PM

Thanks for all the great info everyone! I think I'll steer clear from all of them, just in case.

By the way, do you split those vanilla beans to make it more potent? I don't usually buy much liquor. If I can't find that brand, does it state "from potatoes" on bottles, or do you just have to know that? I appreciate the recipe. I made vanilla 25 years ago, but used bourbon. Thanks for reminding me that I can make my own. :)


You can split the bean. I just cut the beans in half. If I want somethign a bit more "vanilla" such as something I want to really taste like vanilla (as opposed to the vanilla in a chocolate cake per se) then I'll squeeze a bit of the goop (seeds) from inside the bean into what I'm making or cut the bean in half and scrape some out. I don't remove my beans after the 4-6 week brewing period. I just keep them in there to use again and again or to have handy to scrape out the middle should I want it.
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V
Severe airborne allergies since childhood. Was on constant antihisamines with behavior issues. Digestion issues started noticably around 1985.
1992 IBS diagnosis.
2004 Corn allergy - through diet discovery.
2005 RAST negative to all food allergies. High cholesterol diagnosed as PCOS.
2006 Immunolabs ELISA and IgE assay:
IgE to Corn, Milk, Eggs, & White Bean.
IgG to peppers, blk/wt pepper, beans, almonds, yeasts.
Neg. to Celiac, gluten, etc. High IgA level.
2008 No longer considered as having PCOS, or associated risks.

Currently avoiding corn, eggs, cow & goat milk, all beans (cept some soy derivatives & peanut oil), cruciferous veggies, onions/garlic, carrots/celery, anything bilberry/cranberry/blueberry, peppers, and anything remotely corn derived, corntaminated.

Currently off all allergy medications for airborne allergies and breathing fine.

#10 Simply_V

 
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Posted 19 October 2006 - 01:45 AM

Thanks for all the great info everyone! I think I'll steer clear from all of them, just in case.

By the way, do you split those vanilla beans to make it more potent? I don't usually buy much liquor. If I can't find that brand, does it state "from potatoes" on bottles, or do you just have to know that? I appreciate the recipe. I made vanilla 25 years ago, but used bourbon. Thanks for reminding me that I can make my own. :)


Oops I totally forgot about the alcohol. Most vodka's will say which they come from. Luksusowa is the only potato vodka brand that I know the name of. If you can't find where it says, don't buy it. A lot of vodkas are made from wheat, rye, etc which I don't know about gluten-status on those.
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V
Severe airborne allergies since childhood. Was on constant antihisamines with behavior issues. Digestion issues started noticably around 1985.
1992 IBS diagnosis.
2004 Corn allergy - through diet discovery.
2005 RAST negative to all food allergies. High cholesterol diagnosed as PCOS.
2006 Immunolabs ELISA and IgE assay:
IgE to Corn, Milk, Eggs, & White Bean.
IgG to peppers, blk/wt pepper, beans, almonds, yeasts.
Neg. to Celiac, gluten, etc. High IgA level.
2008 No longer considered as having PCOS, or associated risks.

Currently avoiding corn, eggs, cow & goat milk, all beans (cept some soy derivatives & peanut oil), cruciferous veggies, onions/garlic, carrots/celery, anything bilberry/cranberry/blueberry, peppers, and anything remotely corn derived, corntaminated.

Currently off all allergy medications for airborne allergies and breathing fine.

#11 Guest_Kathy Ann_*

 
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Posted 19 October 2006 - 09:28 AM

Thanks!

I just looked on the Enjoy Life site. As a company they are VERY conscious of nearly every allergen imaginable. They list their products as corn free. And yet, xanthan gum is in nearly all of them. They claim that there just isn't any way for corn elements to be there after processing. Do MOST of you with corn allergies have a problem with it, or just a very few? I don't get immediate symptoms, so I have no way of knowing without a long tedious experiment with myself.
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#12 Simply_V

 
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Posted 19 October 2006 - 12:09 PM

Thanks!

I just looked on the Enjoy Life site. As a company they are VERY conscious of nearly every allergen imaginable. They list their products as corn free. And yet, xanthan gum is in nearly all of them. They claim that there just isn't any way for corn elements to be there after processing. Do MOST of you with corn allergies have a problem with it, or just a very few? I don't get immediate symptoms, so I have no way of knowing without a long tedious experiment with myself.


It depends on your sensitivity. If you are having problems and want to heal fully, then don't chance the Xathan. You can always add it back later and test it.

Most of the people that I talk to find they do better without the Xanthan gum. You will hear from companies all the time that "blank" is so processed it no longer is an allergy problem. But when people can taste test and pick out which have processed corn derivatives and which dont.. well we start to doubt the 'processing'.

I won't lie to you, there are some who have no problems with Xanthan. Just as there are some who say they have no problems with citric acid. But for me, I have a hard time believing that. As citric acid will immediately render me useless. But Xanthan gum is a bit quieter. It causes a queazy feeling at first like something isn't setting well, then within 24 hours my skin will develp cystic acne.
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V
Severe airborne allergies since childhood. Was on constant antihisamines with behavior issues. Digestion issues started noticably around 1985.
1992 IBS diagnosis.
2004 Corn allergy - through diet discovery.
2005 RAST negative to all food allergies. High cholesterol diagnosed as PCOS.
2006 Immunolabs ELISA and IgE assay:
IgE to Corn, Milk, Eggs, & White Bean.
IgG to peppers, blk/wt pepper, beans, almonds, yeasts.
Neg. to Celiac, gluten, etc. High IgA level.
2008 No longer considered as having PCOS, or associated risks.

Currently avoiding corn, eggs, cow & goat milk, all beans (cept some soy derivatives & peanut oil), cruciferous veggies, onions/garlic, carrots/celery, anything bilberry/cranberry/blueberry, peppers, and anything remotely corn derived, corntaminated.

Currently off all allergy medications for airborne allergies and breathing fine.

#13 jerseyangel

 
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Posted 19 October 2006 - 01:40 PM

But Xanthan gum is a bit quieter. It causes a queazy feeling at first like something isn't setting well, then within 24 hours my skin will develp cystic acne.

Oh my goodness--this could be it! I've been eating something with xanthan gum in it lately. The last time was Monday night--I had indigestion all night and didn't sleep well or much at all, really. My face is also breaking out a little bit--around my nose. Thanks :)
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Patti


"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

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"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev




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