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Intolerance Can Lead To Full-blown Celiac?


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#1 GEF

 
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Posted 10 August 2004 - 09:22 AM

I've heard it mentioned that through time gluten intolerance (if no dietary changes are made) can lead to full-blown celiac... is that true??? And in the possible case that the presence of antibodies in someone's blood is due to an intestinal permeablity issue (from another disorder), is is still just as important and necessary to go gluten-free? ... what I'm trying to ask is if the antibodies could be just as damaging elsewhere in the body, if no damage has yet been discovered in the intestines?

Do those antibodies really show up for no reason??

I'm just curious

Gretchen
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#2 Alexolua

 
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Posted 10 August 2004 - 11:16 AM

what I'm trying to ask is if the antibodies could be just as damaging elsewhere in the body, if no damage has yet been discovered in the intestines?

Well, just in my experience.. there was no damage discovered in my small intestines, yet I do have a lot of problems. Not sure if that is what you wanted to know? Some people break out in rashes from gluten, which is elsewhere.

I've heard it mentioned that through time gluten intolerance (if no dietary changes are made) can lead to full-blown celiac... is that true???

Yeah, I've read that too.. and pretty sure that's true. Not an expert though.

Do those antibodies really show up for no reason??

I think there is always a reason, I've read some things that mention other reasons, but not remembering enough to give a good answer sorry. Hopefully someone else can fill in all the holes I left. =)
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#3 GEF

 
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Posted 11 August 2004 - 05:31 AM

My family has been less than supportive when it comes to celiac and my non-diagnosis and my stepmom thinks I'm obsessing. Um... anyone would be obsessing if they had GI issues for 5 years with no answer in my opinion... but, I'm not obsessing, I'm being proactive about my health. ;) If I changed my diet on meer antibodies without a diagnosis, they'd think I was crazy. Well, now I seriously have an argument... of which I didn't know about. I spoke with my fiance' about the pre-celiac state and he was suprised to hear that as well. He's going to go to the doctor soon about his GI issues (which seem to be worse than mine). He's Irish, so I mentioned that he should get tested for celiac. I go back to the doctor on 9/3 to get some more antibody tests and he wants to do a small bowel x-ray (I'm assuming to rule out Crohn's). As soon as that's ruled out, I really need to get to changing my diet. I'm pre-disposed to auto-immune disease and GI symptomatic... I'd certainly like to prevent problems in the future.

Would you change your diet if you had my blood results? (see signature)

Thank you for your help

Gretchen
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#4 lovegrov

 
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Posted 11 August 2004 - 06:35 AM

Gretchen,

You have two positive blood tests and one borderline. I assume you have some celiac or gluten intolerance type symptoms. From everything I've read this means the chance you have something involving gluten is approaching 100 percent. The Igg can be raised by other things (don't have a list with me) but the Iga is VERY specific to celiac. The ttg, which is borderline, tests for small bowel damage.

I can't remember now whether you've had the small bowel biopsy. If not, you should demand it given your test results and symptoms. Make sure whoever does it knows to take numerous samples from all over, not just two or three. Damage can be patchy, so one part of your bowel can look normal while other parts do not.

If the doctors remain stubborn , then yes, given what you've said, I would try the diet.

Don't know if that helps much.

richard
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#5 GEF

 
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Posted 11 August 2004 - 07:16 AM

I had a small bowel biopsy a year ago when only my IGG was positive... the biopsy came back normal. My tTg is negative, but it's the Anti-reticulin that's borderline. I really don't know much about what that indicates. I had a colonoscopy last month and everything was normal. I'm kinda glad the IGA showed up this time, as that gives a little more direction. I'm very symptomatic and that's primarily how the IGG was discovered... the doc's just trying to rule out some other things right now.... I have elevated total & indirect bilirubin. I've had GI issues since the end of 1999, but attributed it mostly to lactose intolerance. I've been extremely careful with lactose and would find that I'd still be getting sick over some foods... that's what led me to the GI specialist. All I got from that was an IBS diagnosis and I gave up searching for a while. On my return (to a new doctor) the celiac profile was re-run and the IGA showed up.

Thank you for your input, Richard.

Gretchen
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#6 burdee

 
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Posted 11 August 2004 - 10:07 AM

Gretchen: I changed my diet (eliminated gluten) on the basis of my excruciatingly painful SYMPTOMS which had previously been MISdiagnosed IBS (which is NOT a disease, but merely a label doctors assign to symptoms they can't explain with a causative agent). If going gluten free relieves your 'IBS' or gastrointestinal symptoms, that further supports your 2 positive blood tests and one borderline test. Many people on this board self-diagnosed on the basis of successfully resolving SYMPTOMS by using the gluten free diet. When my symptoms did not completely disappear with the gluten-free diet, I got tested through Enterolab which also tested for milk sensitivity antibodies. Their tests confirmed gluten AND casein autoimmune responses as well as the celiac gene. So I would recommend further testing if the gluten free diet does NOT resolve your symptoms.

I suspect you need the doctor's confirmation to counter your stepmom's label of 'obsessing' and your family's lack of support. Perhaps the best proof for them that you need the gluten free diet is that your symptoms disappear when you go gluten free for a while. ;)
BURDEE
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Gluten, dairy, soy, egg, cane sugar, vanilla and nutmeg free. Enterolab diagnosed gluten/casein intolerant 7/04; soy intolerant 8/07. ELISA test diagnosed egg/cane sugar IgG allergies 8/06; vanilla/nutmeg 8/06. 2006-10 diagnosed by DNA Microbial stool tests and successfully treated: Klebsiella, Enterobacter Cloaecae, Cryptosporidia, Candida, C-diff, Achromobacter, H. Pylori and Dientamoeba Fragilis. 6/10 Heidelberg capsule test diagnosed hypochloridia. Vitamin D deficiency, hypothyroiditis, hypochloridia and low white blood cells caused vulnerability to infections. I now take Betaine HCl, probiotics, Vitamin D and T3 thyroid supplement to maintain immunity.


#7 GEF

 
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Posted 11 August 2004 - 10:30 AM

I suspect you need the doctor's confirmation to counter your stepmom's label of 'obsessing' and your family's lack of support.

Yes, exactly!
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