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What Are Your Symptoms Of Peanut Allergy?


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#1 azmom3

 
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Posted 22 October 2006 - 07:51 AM

My 2 year old is allergic to peanuts, tree nuts, hazelnut, pistachio and sunflower, but I never would've known had he not been tested. He had been eating peanut butter on crackers, toast, sandwiches, etc. for at least 6 months without any noticeable symptoms and having it almost every day as it was one of the few things I could count on that he would eat and that would pack on some calories for him. He tested moderate high on almost every nut though in his blood work.

Does everyone have symptoms or are some just not noticeable than others?

Do you all carry epipens? Our allergy doctor said he doesn't have anaphalactic levels to any of his allergies and the epipen was not brought up at all. Should I revisit this with him? I've had him off nuts for 5 days now, but have not been reading labels close enough to see if he could still be getting traces somewhere.

Has anyone symptoms gotten worse over time?

Do you read labels for these and avoid things that might have traces of nuts in them?

Are there any peanut butter substitutes when he's allergic to all of this?

Thanks!
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Posted 22 October 2006 - 08:10 AM

can he have soy? I like the soynut butter...

I don't think I'm allergic to peanuts, but when I eat them my lips get tingly. My allergy tests didn't show any sensitivity to peanuts...
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#3 Michi8

 
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Posted 22 October 2006 - 08:17 AM

My 2 year old is allergic to peanuts, tree nuts, hazelnut, pistachio and sunflower, but I never would've known had he not been tested. He had been eating peanut butter on crackers, toast, sandwiches, etc. for at least 6 months without any noticeable symptoms and having it almost every day as it was one of the few things I could count on that he would eat and that would pack on some calories for him. He tested moderate high on almost every nut though in his blood work.

Does everyone have symptoms or are some just not noticeable than others?

Do you all carry epipens? Our allergy doctor said he doesn't have anaphalactic levels to any of his allergies and the epipen was not brought up at all. Should I revisit this with him? I've had him off nuts for 5 days now, but have not been reading labels close enough to see if he could still be getting traces somewhere.

Has anyone symptoms gotten worse over time?

Do you read labels for these and avoid things that might have traces of nuts in them?

Are there any peanut butter substitutes when he's allergic to all of this?

Thanks!


I had peanut allergy since early childhood. My reaction was always itchy lips, mouth, tongue, throat and ears. I never developed an anaphylactic response, and eventually outgrew the allergy as an adult (though sometimes I still get a slight reaction to peanuts...I suspect I'm more sensitive to raw peanut than roasted/cooked. My peanut reaction is the same as my other food allergy reactions...my allergist calls it "oral allergy syndrome." A friend's child had peanut allergy since infanthood. They avoided all peanut and nut products, and then re-tested at 8 years old. He outgrew the allergy already, and now eats peanuts to keep the allergy at bay. :)

Pea Butter is one substitute for peanut butter. I don't like it myself (neither do my kids!) but some kids find it a fine alternative. There are other nut butters as well, but I wouldn't introduce any more new nuts to your 2 year old yet. I'd give it another year at least.

Michelle
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#4 flagbabyds

 
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Posted 22 October 2006 - 08:45 AM

You could try almond butter because you did not list almonds in the list and my friend (also a celaic) who is allergic to all nuts, can eat almonds, they are supposed to ebe hypoallergenic but i am not sure it probably varries from person to person
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#5 azmom3

 
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Posted 22 October 2006 - 08:58 AM

I guess I'm not sure what exactly is considered a tree nut, but these are the foods/drinks we know for sure he's allergic to based on blood work:

Peanuts, almonds, brazil nut, cashew, coconut, pecan, sesame, walnut, hazelnut, pistachio, sunflower, macadamia, egg, and milk

We are testing tomorrow for soy and wheat and maybe others after talking to the allergist.

We're not sure about peas as he refuses to eat them. He ate them as a baby, but had hives every day from all his other allergies, so it was really hard figuring out what he could handle and what he couldn't. I'm up for trying the peabutter or soybutter if it turns out he's not allergic. He refuses soymilk, but not sure if he just doesn't like the taste or texture or if he knows something I don't. ;)
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#6 Michi8

 
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Posted 22 October 2006 - 09:38 AM

You could try almond butter because you did not list almonds in the list and my friend (also a celaic) who is allergic to all nuts, can eat almonds, they are supposed to ebe hypoallergenic but i am not sure it probably varries from person to person


No such thing as a hypoallergenic food, let alone nuts. :) Almonds and hazelnuts (filberts) are quite closely related in terms of allergy...and, as well, those nuts are related to allergy to tree fruit, which can be related to birch tree pollen allergy. I am severly allergic to birch tree pollen, and so have a cross reaction with all those foods...I can eat all of them cooked (including the nuts) but not raw. Lucky me. :P

Michelle
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#7 azmom3

 
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Posted 22 October 2006 - 07:58 PM

No such thing as a hypoallergenic food, let alone nuts. :) Almonds and hazelnuts (filberts) are quite closely related in terms of allergy...and, as well, those nuts are related to allergy to tree fruit, which can be related to birch tree pollen allergy. I am severly allergic to birch tree pollen, and so have a cross reaction with all those foods...I can eat all of them cooked (including the nuts) but not raw. Lucky me. :P

Michelle


Interesting....is this common to have the allergy to the other things associated with it? If he's allergic to peanuts and all tree nuts, which fruits should I be concerned about?
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#8 pixiegirl

 
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Posted 23 October 2006 - 04:40 AM

I posted in the EG topic about this. Both my daughter and I have peanut allergies, mine is mild hers is severe. My daughter is also allergic to tree nuts and peas (legumes like peanuts). We both carry epi pens.

There is a ton of info on the net about peanut allergies, its certainly well documented and studied... its not an allergy that is commonly outgrown (it can be but usually isn't). It also has a tendancy to get worse with each exposure (like bee stings).

My daughter had a bad peanut allergy initially. In public school she kept getting exposed to peanuts... kids eat it and its on their hands and door knobs, she probably had up to 10 exposures a year and her allergy went from bad to severe, she now has airborne reactions. We did take her out to homeschool her for a while and she went back to public in middle school as not as many kids eat peanut butter and jelly at that age. All thru middle school she had very few reactions and now in high school this year, so far she has had none.

My reaction is mild with itchy eyes, neck, skin.

susan
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#9 azmom3

 
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Posted 23 October 2006 - 11:48 AM

I posted in the EG topic about this. Both my daughter and I have peanut allergies, mine is mild hers is severe. My daughter is also allergic to tree nuts and peas (legumes like peanuts). We both carry epi pens.

There is a ton of info on the net about peanut allergies, its certainly well documented and studied... its not an allergy that is commonly outgrown (it can be but usually isn't). It also has a tendancy to get worse with each exposure (like bee stings).

My daughter had a bad peanut allergy initially. In public school she kept getting exposed to peanuts... kids eat it and its on their hands and door knobs, she probably had up to 10 exposures a year and her allergy went from bad to severe, she now has airborne reactions. We did take her out to homeschool her for a while and she went back to public in middle school as not as many kids eat peanut butter and jelly at that age. All thru middle school she had very few reactions and now in high school this year, so far she has had none.

My reaction is mild with itchy eyes, neck, skin.

susan


Susan,

Thanks for the info! I'm still new enought that it never would've even crossed my mind about PB&J's getting on doorknobs, etc. in elementary school. That's scary! Do you have any idea why peanuts and beestings can get worse while other types of allergies can get better? Also, what about tree nuts? worse or better? Thanks for your input and help.
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#10 pixiegirl

 
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Posted 23 October 2006 - 03:42 PM

I really don't know why that is with bee stings and peanuts... in elementary schools peanut better is virtually everywhere... kids eat and touch stuff. But my daughter reacts in airplanes when they pass out peanuts. She is very sensitive now.

Susan
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#11 jayhawkmom

 
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Posted 23 October 2006 - 04:01 PM

My daughter has had an anaphylactic reaction to peanut butter, we avoid peanuts, all nuts, and seeds like the plague. With peanut allergy, it's seldom outgrown and it tends to get worse with each exposure.

I carry epi pends, benedryl, and she wears a medic alert bracelet.

FWIW - "classes" with regards to RAST allergy testing mean nothing. The theory is that a child with a lower "class" allergy won't react as badly as a child with higher class allergy. Days after anaphylaxis, my daughter was a high class 3.

She recently tested negative on the RAST, negative on skin testing, and then during a food trial she started vomitting profusly - and they quickly haulted the challenge!

I'm absolutely TERRIFIED for her to start school next year.
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#12 tarnalberry

 
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Posted 23 October 2006 - 04:15 PM

Many people never develop anaphylactic reactions to allergenic foods that they are sensitive to. It's best not to continue exposing him to it, but it means that you don't have to be as paranoid about, for example, someone in the same room eating peanuts, so long as he doesn't eat any. I don't have any suggestions of substitutes, other than looking into different types of food - maybe hummus?
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#13 azmom3

 
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Posted 23 October 2006 - 08:56 PM

My daughter has had an anaphylactic reaction to peanut butter, we avoid peanuts, all nuts, and seeds like the plague. With peanut allergy, it's seldom outgrown and it tends to get worse with each exposure.

I carry epi pends, benedryl, and she wears a medic alert bracelet.

FWIW - "classes" with regards to RAST allergy testing mean nothing. The theory is that a child with a lower "class" allergy won't react as badly as a child with higher class allergy. Days after anaphylaxis, my daughter was a high class 3.

She recently tested negative on the RAST, negative on skin testing, and then during a food trial she started vomitting profusly - and they quickly haulted the challenge!

I'm absolutely TERRIFIED for her to start school next year.


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#14 Nantzie

 
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Posted 23 October 2006 - 09:07 PM

Oh my gosh. I had absolutely NO idea that the symptoms were so vague, or not easily noticed by a parent. I always just heard about the peanut allergy and the epipen and calling 911 type anaphylactic reaction. I didn't realize that someone could be allergic but still eat it or that there were different levels of allergic reaction. I just thought that if my kids didn't react obviously, that they were fine with it.

Thanks for posting this. It's a good thing for everyone to know.

Nancy
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#15 Michi8

 
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Posted 24 October 2006 - 06:46 AM

Many people never develop anaphylactic reactions to allergenic foods that they are sensitive to. It's best not to continue exposing him to it, but it means that you don't have to be as paranoid about, for example, someone in the same room eating peanuts, so long as he doesn't eat any. I don't have any suggestions of substitutes, other than looking into different types of food - maybe hummus?


Anaphylaxis is still a rather "rare" reaction to allergens. Allergies seem to be on the rise, but I don't know if true anaphylactic reactions are, or if allergist are treating allergies with more caution now and prescribing epipens "just in case" reactions become severe.

I knew I wasn't anaphylactic to peanuts, my parents never bothered to have me officially tested as a kid and my school could have cared less about allergies (I had to fend for myself to avoid reactions, and so knew how to carefully avoid allergens.) It wasn't until I did some testing as an adult that the allergist insisted I carry an epipen. I thought it was overkill...my allergies never did get worse...and I eventually outgrew the peanut allergy. It used to be thought that outgrowing peanut allery was rare, but, from what I've read, it's actually quite common (in the case of non-anaphylactic allergies.)

My kids' elementary school is now "nut aware," and I think it's a cop out. We've gone from being careful on a class by class basis (used to be no nuts or nut products were allowed in a classroom with an allergic child) to outright banning nut products from the school. Personally, I believe that it causes complacency...that there is an assumption that the school is now completely safe. However, for children who are truly anaphylactic, the risks are higher because the risk of cc is still there. How many kids have their lunches prepared in a home where nut products are everywhere? How many kids eat peanut butter for breakfast and have it on their hands/clothes and are bringing peanut residue into the school unknowingly? If a child then does have a reaction, how does the source get traced? And how does the allergic child learn to watch out for themselves? There will come a time when their school or workplace is not "nut aware," will that child know to suddenly start watching for risks of exposure?

Finally, what about the kids with other severe allergies? So, the nut allergies are supposedly taken care of. But milk & egg proteins are in everything. There are celiac kids in our school...we don't see gluten being banned. There's got to be a better solution.

Michelle
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