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Other Food Intolerances?
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I'm trying not to get too stressed about health problems which I *don't* have because I have enough on my plate as it is.

But I can't help but wonder about the possibility of developing other food intolerances. I was *hoping* that maybe some of my allergies might be related to celiac disease (insofar as people with celiac have other immunological problems) but that now that I'm going gluten free, my immune system will calm down and I won't develop any more food sensitivities.

I see though that lots of people start developing food intolerances *after* going on the gluten free diet. Is that common? Or are people more likely to stop developing intolerances after being gluten free?

Is developing a rice intolerance common if you are eating rice all day every day? I seriously am limited in the grains department because of other allergies . . . if I were to develop issues with rice I don't know what I'd do.

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I honestly don't know if anyone has officially studied people developing other intolerances. I have yet to read a journal article about it.

BUT, that being said---like you noticed---there are a ton of people on this board who have multiple intolerances. Some all hit at once; some were fine just going gluten free --- and then something changed. That was the case for me. I was 100% great on the gluten-free diet; then, starting this past winter/spring, my new symptoms began. I honestly don't understand it...all we have here is "anecdotal" evidence. But it does seem, that for some people, there is an increased likelihood of other food intolerances at some point.

I don't know if it matters how much/little you eat of something....I just really don't know the answer to that. In general, rice is a relatively safe food for many. However, there are some people (like myself) who can't have any grains at all. I understand---rice was one of my staples.

I am sorry I don't have a better answer. I think we are on the brink of learning so much more. We just aren't there yet. If there is anything I can do, please post or PM me. I have lots of recipes and ideas (but, can't use them anymore because of my other, recent issues).

I hope this helps some. :)

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I honestly don't know if anyone has officially studied people developing other intolerances. I have yet to read a journal article about it.

BUT, that being said---like you noticed---there are a ton of people on this board who have multiple intolerances. Some all hit at once; some were fine just going gluten free --- and then something changed. That was the case for me. I was 100% great on the gluten-free diet; then, starting this past winter/spring, my new symptoms began. I honestly don't understand it...all we have here is "anecdotal" evidence. But it does seem, that for some people, there is an increased likelihood of other food intolerances at some point.

I don't know if it matters how much/little you eat of something....I just really don't know the answer to that. In general, rice is a relatively safe food for many. However, there are some people (like myself) who can't have any grains at all. I understand---rice was one of my staples.

I am sorry I don't have a better answer. I think we are on the brink of learning so much more. We just aren't there yet. If there is anything I can do, please post or PM me. I have lots of recipes and ideas (but, can't use them anymore because of my other, recent issues).

I hope this helps some. :)

I wish I could have some answers for you, but I am very much like Laura. I did well on the gluten free diet initially and now I feel like I am intolerant to EVERYTHING, including ALL grains. It can get quite depressing at times because I feel like EVERYTHING makes me sick now. I am thinking about doing the Specific Carbohydrate diet (without the yogurt/dairy part). I heard that if you do that for at least a year you have a chance at healing your intestines. I just do not know what else to do. But maybe it will not happen to you. My brother has Celiac also and so far is doing fine on the gluten free diet.

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Thank you both---I guess it is one of those things where I'll have to wait and see and hope for the best. I've heard conflicting things about the rotation diet---my sister's naturopath put her on one for awhile. And it does make sense to me--it seems that people tend to be allergic to the foods that are commonly eaten---i.e. here wheat allergy is one of the top 8 allergens. In countries where rice is the staple, a rice allergy is more common. But then I read in a medical journal that there are some concerns that a rotation diet could prime the system for a reaction. There was no explanation--just that statement. And I know that allergists would say that I am more likely to have an allergic reaction to a *new* food than to develop an allergy to one that I have tolerated.

It seems to me that I developed *new* problems after my diet shifted----I started eating corn and potatoes much more often when I stopped eating wheat and I developed allergies to them. I do think that I was already allergic to corn. And a potato allergy would be likely given some of my other allergies. So I'm hoping that once my immune system doesn't have gluten to pick on that it won't start looking for something else :unsure:

I thought I had it tough---but avoiding *all* grains would be very, very difficult on top of other major dietary restrictions. I've felt like breaking down and crying in the middle of the grocery store before! But it usually doesn't hit me unless I'm around people eating food that I used to love but can't have anymore.

I do try to go out of my way to make special things that I *can* have--like I discovered this spice shop where I can get whole spices that aren't cross contaminated with nuts. Since I've found this place (a few weeks ago) I've been enjoying freshly grated nutmeg (that I grate myself) on just about everything!

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Hi--mine didn't develop all at once. First I went gluten free and then I decided to try the Eat Right For Your Blood Type diet. Well, I am a Type A and it said to eliminate dairy and use soy. I loved the 8th Continent Soymilk, but, in a very short time, I realized I was intolerant to soy. Let me see, I have been here for 2 yrs, so the soy happened in the summer of 04. That Christmas, I made cornbread stuffing for the turkey--it was wonderful, yet I got so sick from it and yes, it was gluten free cornmeal. So I thought maybe it was just the cornmeal, then I found I could no longer use corn flour for pizza dough, then I found I could no longer eat the corn macaroni or cereal. I moved here in Dec 04--at that time, I could still use the Red Mill All Purpose Flour and make cookies, but that soon was a problem. Then in late summer of 05, I realized I couldn't eat rice anymore--it had become a staple in my life. In late summer, when the tomatoes were very good, my sweetie brought me some fresh ones and I got so sick. I had tomato on a hamburger and thought maybe the burger was too greasy. So, later on in the week, I sliced another tomato and had it with my cottage cheese--terrible sick again. Then potatoes made me sick--that's when I realized it was nightshades too. I tried spaghetti squash and it made me ill--then someone here told me they can't have it either. Some things just make me feel sick for a week--just a little irratated, not in bed sick. So, here I am--5 yrs after going gluten free and I still feel I can't get this under control.

Through all of this, I also have neuropathy and a headache everyday. My neuropathy reared it's ugly face about 9 yrs ago when I was diagnosed with carpal tunnel. That's when the doctor here says it probably started. They also tell me the headaches are caused by the neuropathy in my neck and shoulders, yet maybe it is corn. So much to think about and too much to deal with at times. I feel for us all who have to deal with so many intolerances.

Deb

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Has anyone asked their doctor about what could possibly cause so many food intolerances? I haven't specifically discussed my gazillion food intolerances with my doctor lately. I had been going to a million doctors for so many years before my Celiac diagnosis that I kind of got tired of going. Could there be some major damage to the intestines? I never had a biopsy, just positive bloodwork. If I went to a GI now, what do you think they would say? I just don't know where to turn to figure all of this out. I would serious go on a liquid diet if I could even find some nutritional shakes that I could drink like ensure or something. But even those have too many ingredients! I am just curious what your doctors are saying about your food intolerances? What if it gets to a point where you cannot eat ANYTHING! I feel like I am heading in that direction. There has to be something that causes such a sudden rise in food intolerances!

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I don't have any answers either, specifically.

I mentioned to my doctor that I've read that the gluten intolerance can mask other intolerances so you dont' discover those until you are gluten free. He didn't disagree with me. That's what I believe is a part of it. I would have a hard time believing it was everything. Maybe certain genes tend toward more intolerances just like it does with gluten sensitivity/celiac.

We got tested through enterolab and since we all have at least one celiac gene, I'm assuming we have the beginning stages of celiac (except my husband). My oldest son tested at a low malabsorption and has hardly any intolerances (he's double dq2), my husband, daughter and I all have many intolerances. We have just eliminated the foods from our diet. I had still been eating my low lows. We will test again mid-november to see if we can note any specific reactions to any of them and further determine what we can still eat.

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I think that when you go gluten-free, your immune system begins to work normally. For some people this may mean responding to foods that give them problems, but have hithertofor (always wanted to use that word) been ignored because gluten was a much bigger problem.

For other people I think that your immune system needs time to adjust, and over-stressing it with whopping doses of the same food over and over *could* be a bad idea.

I've not looked into the rotation diet, but I do pay attention to what I eat and try not to eat the same thing too many days in a row. I just figure that it's my best chance to avoid developing new allergies.

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