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Rice Krispies
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This morning I randomly woke up thinking about Rice Krispies and then I went online to look at the ingredients to see why I have not been eating them. I really don't see anything bad in them, however I am horrible at reading labels. Does anyone know if Rice Krispies are okay to eat? and if they aren't what the ingredient is that contains the gluten? Thanks

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Something about the malt is not okay. I have Celiac and was told not to eat them. They could also be cross-contaminated int he factory.

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Rice Krispies contain malt, which I believe is derived from barley...so it's not safe. There are gluten free brands of rice crisps available.

Michelle

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barley malt :(

but yes Erewhon makes a great gluten-free rice crispy cereal it's even labeled gluten-free

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Hi guys, not to confuse things but I had the same issues and I rang Kellogs about it. They told me that the only cereals approved by the Celiac Association (I presume in the UK) were Rice Crispies and Coca Pops. Just thought Id mention it but Im not saying that they are correct - not contradicting the other people on the board, but thats what Kellogs told me.

Hope it doesnt just confuse you. Maybe Kellogs isnt the brand you get? Try ringing the manufacturer for their response.

Good luck.

Liz

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Hi guys, not to confuse things but I had the same issues and I rang Kellogs about it. They told me that the only cereals approved by the Celiac Association (I presume in the UK) were Rice Crispies and Coca Pops. Just thought Id mention it but Im not saying that they are correct - not contradicting the other people on the board, but thats what Kellogs told me.

Hope it doesnt just confuse you. Maybe Kellogs isnt the brand you get? Try ringing the manufacturer for their response.

Good luck.

Liz

Check out this notation from the Kellogg's UK website (it's from a page listing changes to their gluten free listings):

Please note that only the cereals listed above have been removed - although Kellogg Rice Krispies, Ricicles and Coco Pops contain malt flavouring they fall well within the international Codex Standard of 200ppm

All of those products contain malt, which has gluten. To my knowledge, the U.S. and Canada do not follow the Codex Standard and thus these cereals are not considered gluten free (or should that be "gluten safe?").

Michelle

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not only Erewhon but nature's path, enviro kids and barbara's make rice crispy's. Erewhon makes several types.

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Let's make a distinction between the UK cereals and the USA made cereals.

This could be where the descrepancy lies. UK and USA formulas are not the same.

in USA most commercial cereals have malt (barley)

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I just wanted to relate my personal experience with Rice Krispies. What led me to realize that I couldn't have gluten was the very strict diet I was on while I was breastfeeding after my son was born due to his severe colic. I only realized two years later that I had felt so great not because of the hormonal changes of breastfeeding but because of the strict diet I was on that had inadvertantly eliminated gluten. It was hit or miss and I eliminated anything from my diet that seemed to trigger my son's colic and eczema. I was eating Rice Krispies every day, some times twice a day with rice milk and never felt any ill effects from them. (This was while we were still living in the US). I haven't tried them again since realizing I can't have gluten because I saw they had malt extract in them and after having had some corn flakes which also had malt extract and being realy ill as a result I thought I better stay away, but after what Kellog's has said and what I remember from my previous experience I think I might give them a try. I am a lot more sensitive to gluten now than I was before part of which comes from being pregnant so I'll just have to see. Good luck. It would be nice to be able to walk down the aisle at the grocery store and just pick up something "normal" off the shelf to eat :)

Melody

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Let's make a distinction between the UK cereals and the USA made cereals.

This could be where the descrepancy lies. UK and USA formulas are not the same.

in USA most commercial cereals have malt (barley)

The UK cereals have malt too (note my earlier post). Kelloggs is saying that the gluten level from the malt falls below the Codex Standard 200ppm, so is considered "safe" for European celiacs to eat.

Michelle

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Yes, the difference is not the formula Kelloggs uses in UK and US, but the official definition of what is an acceptable level of gluten to call a product gluten free.

Personally I wouldn't eat Rice krispies no matter what they say....

Pauliina

in Holland

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There is oat flour in Rice Krispies in Canada last time i checked (and the extract)....why dont you just buy the ones from Kinnikinnick? they are pure rice and...yum :)

~ lisa ~

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Check out this notation from the Kellogg's UK website (it's from a page listing changes to their gluten free listings):

Please note that only the cereals listed above have been removed - although Kellogg Rice Krispies, Ricicles and Coco Pops contain malt flavouring they fall well within the international Codex Standard of 200ppm

All of those products contain malt, which has gluten. To my knowledge, the U.S. and Canada do not follow the Codex Standard and thus these cereals are not considered gluten free (or should that be "gluten safe?").

Michelle

Ok, let me tell you my story - it's a little long but I hope to save people by relating my mistakes - I USED to eat cereals with malt - no ill effects I thought at the time. Then after years of this I noticed numbing in my face and when I would get out of bed it felt like I was walking on stumps. Peripheral neurapathy - scary as I'm not even 50 yet. And persistent brain fog - I had even forgotten how to run the software at work, the same program I had used for 5 Years!! So after I joined this forum I finally decided to really clean up my act and eliminated ALL gluten, and even remote cross-contaminations in my house. The numbess disappeared after several months, I have more brain activity and don't sleep away my weekends anymore. My conclusion is that while malt may be considered "safe" by some standards (and I'm not terribly sensitive to gluten in the overt ways) I believe that the effect is cumulative - like mercury in fish. My two cents, but I will never ever ingest malt knowingly again.

Annette

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See I bought the organic rice crispies ... thking they were fine and saw the malt .... and now they are eaten by my soon to be gluten free children.

God I just wish that regular foods would go gluten free .

BUT FRUITY PEBBLES ARE OKAY >... right... :unsure:

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BUT FRUITY PEBBLES ARE OKAY >... right... :unsure:

I can't remember, but as always read all labels. I'm pretty darn sure they are, but I buy the malt-o-meal dyna-bites - much cheaper. But I do buy the coca pebbles when I want to take a dessert to a gathering. I use them to make Rice Krispy treats.

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so the rice crisps arnt gluten-free i though only the treats arnt

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so the rice crisps arnt gluten-free i though only the treats arnt

Anything with the word MALT is bad for us, (unless the malt is from a safe source which is rare. It would be stated on the label ie: rice malt). If the word MALT is byitself, it is made from barley.

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http://www.henryspink.org/celiac_disease.htm

Gluten free food and substances

A comprehensive list of foods to avoid may be viewed on the internet at:

http://www.fastlane.net/homepages/thodge/GFDIET.txt

Looking for gluten free products may not prove an easy task, it is recommended to read labels carefully. It is also advised to contact the manufacturers as gluten may represent such a tiny percentage that it may not appear on their ingredient list. Manufacturers also change the ingredients in their products from time to time.

Gluten is the protein in wheat, barley, rye, oats and their derivatives: malt, grain starches, hydrolysed vegetable/plant proteins, textured vegetable proteins, grain vinegar, grain alcohol, malt, modified food starch, caramel, maltodextrin, soy sauce, flavourings and the binders found in medication. Since the texture of gluten is elastic it also appears in many processed foods as well as in the gum substance on envelopes.

The gluten free list below may vary according to celiac organisations:

- Red and white meat (not bacon) - Lentils

- Fish - Sago

- Shellfish - Yam

- Vegetables - Corn

- Dried, canned or fresh fruits - Potatoes

- Juices (with no other ingredients) - Rice

- Fresh coffee - Flour (made from the above)

- Tea - Rice krispies

- Eggs - Plain crisps

- Soya - Nuts

- Rice - Oil (olive, walnut, sesame, soya,

- Potato sunflower, peanut, rapeseed, maize, cornflower)

- Corn - Pure spices

- Buckwheat - Herbs

- Chickpeas - Maize

- Lentils - Sugar

- Millet - Honey

- Peas - Jams or marmalade

- Beans - Yeast

- Quinoa - Almond

- Tapioca

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I tried using some of the organic brands and didn't like them - not crispy enough. So I tried corn chex (dont know why I didnt try rice chex...) and they are honestly better than my regular rice crispies!

PS: I make them in the crockpot. Same ingred. just add the butter, top with marsh. and then add the cereal!

Way easier, supper yummy!

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Ok so the malt flavoring when you see it in foods like rice krispie treats and things like that you should do more research before you believe it. I never listen to what other people have to say about foods because i have celiac disease to and i like eating a lot of different things. I go straight to the sites and read about them and if i cant find the info there i try to look for articles or things like that. Then i eventually listen to what other people are saying online if i cant find anything. Anyways you can eat rice krispie treats.. Here is a website you can check out if you dont believe me! :) Good luck.. And i hope from now on you follow my advice.

http://www.celiac.com/articles/331/1/The-Safety-of-Malt-for-Those-with-Celiac-Disease/Page1.html

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Here is a website you can check out if you dont believe me! :) Good luck.. And i hope from now on you follow my advice.

http://www.celiac.com/articles/331/1/The-Safety-of-Malt-for-Those-with-Celiac-Disease/Page1.html

Believe what you want, but that article is equivocal on the safety of barley malt for celiacs.

Incidentally, my suspicion is that there is not enough of the harmful peptides in Rice Krispies to cause harm to celiac patients, but for me it is only a suspicion in that I know of no experimental measurements or calculations in regard to the question and we still do not have a really solid indication of how little of the harmful proteins or peptides is OK for celiac patients on a daily basis.

His suspicion isn't enought for me, personally.

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Believe what you want, but that article is equivocal on the safety of barley malt for celiacs.

His suspicion isn't enought for me, personally.

Me either. It isn't like there is nothing else to eat. I'll err on the side of caution & if it says barley and/ or malt, I won't eat it.

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Anyways you can eat rice krispie treats.. Here is a website you can check out if you dont believe me! :) Good luck.. And i hope from now on you follow my advice.

http://www.celiac.com/articles/331/1/The-Safety-of-Malt-for-Those-with-Celiac-Disease/Page1.html

HA!!! I dont think I'll follow your advice at all. Rice Krispies are NOT gluten free. There are other cereals that are, but this isn't one of them! And I'm talking about the United States so can't speak for elsewhere. Also Kellogg's doesn't really make ANY gluten free cereals, do they? So the cross contamination chances are probably pretty large! I mean they make frosted mini WHEATS, and all BRAN, and raisin BRAN!! I can just see the wheat flying around the plant! I hope someone takes the time to call them and find out what else they make in the same plant with the rice krispies, LOL, cuz I'm not going to waste my time. Rice Chex make GREAT treats and General Mills has it's own area to make their gluten free cereals.

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Ok so the malt flavoring when you see it in foods like rice krispie treats and things like that you should do more research before you believe it. I never listen to what other people have to say about foods because i have celiac disease to and i like eating a lot of different things. I go straight to the sites and read about them and if i cant find the info there i try to look for articles or things like that. Then i eventually listen to what other people are saying online if i cant find anything. Anyways you can eat rice krispie treats.. Here is a website you can check out if you dont believe me! :) Good luck.. And i hope from now on you follow my advice.

http://www.celiac.com/articles/331/1/The-Safety-of-Malt-for-Those-with-Celiac-Disease/Page1.html

I wouldn't touch them. If you want to take the risk fine.

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Hi guys, not to confuse things but I had the same issues and I rang Kellogs about it. They told me that the only cereals approved by the Celiac Association (I presume in the UK) were Rice Crispies and Coca Pops. Just thought Id mention it but Im not saying that they are correct - not contradicting the other people on the board, but thats what Kellogs told me.

Hope it doesnt just confuse you. Maybe Kellogs isnt the brand you get? Try ringing the manufacturer for their response.

Good luck.

Liz

I called kelloges and they said there is malt in the rice krispies,they have no cearel that is gluren free
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