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Bah Humbug


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29 replies to this topic

#16 floridanative

 
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Posted 27 November 2006 - 09:40 AM

Oh I just love this thread! When we left town on Wed. am, several homes in our SD had their weaths up on each window, well they were up at least by Sunday night actually. I thought, can you let me have at least Thanksgiving without haveing to see Christmas decor? Skip to Thanksgiving morning when my nephew (his play room is full of toys plus basement has more) is dying to open a gift since we all brought their gifts with us as is tradition - no shipping cost that way. His parnets go up and find some gift from his b-day that was a toy still in the plastic, wrapped it and told the kid his grandparents gave it to him. I saw the 5yo storm upstairs and knew he was very unhappy but I hadn't heard what happened so my SIL told me. He opened the gift, yelled 'I think I already have this one' (transformer) and ran upstairs to find out. His punishment was sitting in his room comtemplating his behavior and when it was time to eat, he opted not to eat Thanksgiving dinner with us. Some other grandparents stopped by after dinner to say hi and they were told they could not see the child since he'd been so bad....... Can you imagine what such a child will be like when he's 15? And you can't blame the kid since it's the parents giving him a hundred toys throughout the year that made him this way. I think I'll follow jegstars example next year and give those kids a note that explains how we gave to needy children that otherwise would not have anything on Christmas morning.

DH has never enjoyed Christmas as an adult. He doesn't want to exchange gifts with in-laws (mine or his) since we all have any and everything we need or want and he'd rather give to charity. We do that too, but we still give gifts to everyone as well. I think next year I'll agree to not give to our siblings gifts and see how that goes over. My sister will be fine with that but DH's probably won't be. It's just too much stuff and people are starving to death every day. I think we can enjoy Christmas more if we get back to what the season is really celebrating. The only people I know who aren't stressed at Christmas are my agnostic friends. That's pretty sad I think.
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Dx'd with anemia - March 2005
Positive blood tests - Sept. 2005
Positive biopsy - Jan. 2006
Gluten free since 1-23-06

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#17 Guest_nini_*

 
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Posted 27 November 2006 - 10:07 AM

like I said earlier, I refuse to get sucked into the insanity. As if I had the money to do anything anyway... I haven't even contemplated getting the Christmas decorations out of the attic yet. It's not even Dec. 1st. My mom already has her tree up.
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#18 2Boys4Me

 
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Posted 27 November 2006 - 10:21 AM

I agree with the decorations at Halloween being a wee bit too soon. My personal Christmas decorating policy is one my kids disagree with, because they LOVE the Christmas tree. It's this: No Christmas decorations go up until AFTER Uncle Toby's birthday Dec. 9th. We put up a tree which the kids decorate, and have a few little ceramic snowmen type of things and stockings. It all comes down Jan. 1st or 2nd.
We have a spending limit and the adult brothers/sisters no longer exchange gifts and other than our very young cousins, we don't have our kids exchange with cousins either. We usually have about 15 people for Christmas dinner and each of the kids will bring a new game or something for everyone to share after dinner. Last year my MIL bought each of her kids/kids-in-law two chickens and a goat in a small community in Africa. I can't remember the name of the organization, but I love that idea. I have everything that I need so there's no point getting me something I don't need.
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Linda, Mom to Ty (11 years old)
Ty was diagnosed by blood test June 7/05
biopsy Aug 11/05, diagnosis confirmed Aug 18/05
Mom, Dad and big brother Celiac-free.

#19 lonewolf

 
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Posted 27 November 2006 - 11:18 AM

Last year in my dh's extended family we bought 3 goats. We all found pictures of goats online, printed them out and put them in cards and tried to figure out who's goat was better looking. The kids all got way too much, something I'm trying to downplay, but at least the adults in my dh's family have decided that we all have enough. I told my kids and hubby that I'd be happy with a goat for a truly needy person and a cheese/carrot grater (mine is rusty and yucky).

We still try to make Christmas special, without all the commercialization. Even my girls, at 15 and 13 are looking forward to driving around looking at Christmas lights (hot cocoa in thermoses), making a gluten-free gingerbread house, the school and church Christmas programs, watching Christmas videos, driving to the mountains to go sledding and having no school! We get each child (also have boys ages 11 and 9) one big thing (about $25 max.) that they will like, some clothes and a stocking full of little gifts and candy. They see that thier cousins and friends get way more, but they seem to understand that expensive gifts aren't our focus. We also choose a child from the "Angel Tree" at church (for children whose parents are in prison) and also choose gifts to buy for an "Adopt-a-Family" family from our school.
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Liz

Started Specific Carbohydrate Diet on 8-16-09 because son was diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis and want to give him moral support.

Diagnosed with Minimal Change Nephrotic Syndrome in 2003. Discovered that going completely gluten-free put me in remission.

I would have despaired unless I had believed that I would see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living. Psalms 27:13

#20 Generic

 
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Posted 27 November 2006 - 03:26 PM

Last year the kids and I started a new tradition. We love Halloween so much, we decided we would have a "Nightmare Before Christmas" themed christmas. We have lovely sally and Jack stockings. For the tree we put fake cobwebs with purple and oarnge lights. We also have purple and oarnge ornaments and of course a nice set of Nightmare Before x-mas ornaments. (we are going to make some this year, by buying plain ones and drawing the glue on in fun shapes and dipping in different colored glitter). I made black bows for the tree also.

For the mantel I bought a string of jack lights and spider garland from halloween. I am going to sew a black tree skirt and draw with glue a spider web then sprinkle silver glitter on it. It will look like a web surronding the treee.

It has managed to put a little fun back into christmas. It is fun for us, looking for alternative decorations and makes the season a little more bearable. And if the stores are going to make me think about christmas before halloween, then I will just buy halloween decorations for christmas. LOL :P


I love the livestock donation idea, think I might have to do that. Especially for my niece that is an ungrateful brat, who doesn't deserve coal. The adults will love that there gifts would be to a family that could use the help.
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#21 ianm

 
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Posted 27 November 2006 - 03:46 PM

Christmas has turned into the most idiotic holiday around. The only reason I like this stupid holiday is because I get time off from work. I give my son some gifts and that is it. My girlfriend and I can afford whatever we want whenever we want so we just get some token gift for each other and that is it. My parents don't want or need anything except to see their grandson. My mom likes to get us some gifts but nothing extravegant. My ex-wife and her family were of the more gifts=more love persuasion and I am glad I don't have to deal with that insanity anymore. I would love to see everyone wake up and walk out of the stores and not buy anything for anybody at Christmas anymore. Sure the economy would take a dive but for some reason I think we would ultimately be better off in the long run. BAH HUMBUG!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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If all the world is indeed a stage and we are merely players then will someone give me the script because I have no f!@#$%^ clue as to what is going on!

What does not kill you makes you stronger.
Nobody cares about losers and quitters never win. If you fail with the cowards then what's the message you send?
Can't get it right, no matter what I do. Might as well be me and keep fu@$ing up for you. - Brian Thomas (Halloween, the greatest metal band ever!)

Ian Moore. Self diagnosed at 36 because the doctors were clueless.
Started low-carb diet early 2004, felt better but not totally gluten-free. Went 100% gluten-free early 2005 and life has never been better.

#22 happygirl

 
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Posted 27 November 2006 - 03:53 PM

I'm going to have to agree with Debbie. :D

I think Christmas is the best time of the year. I just can't help it. :) Christmas was such a special time in our family...my parents instilled in us the 'magic' and true meaning of Christmas...we are all grown now, and our significant others think it is the greatest thing and love Christmas at my parents house.

I pick and choose:

I love Christmas music but hate songs like "grandma got ran over by a reindeer" so I only listen to my Christmas CDs, mainly with Christmas instrumental tracks.

I do love gift giving: getting special things that mean something to each other. We have a tradition to give an ornament each year, usually it represents something that person did in the past year. Sometimes they are real ornaments, sometimes they are tiny toys that we 'rig' to be an ornament. My Christmas tree ornaments represent all of our lives.

But, the first thing I think of with Christmas traditions is not the gifts I have gotten, but it is going to Christmas Eve service with my husband, parents, grandma, siblings, and now, my sweet nieces. Sitting next to my grandma and putting my head on her shoulder during the service means so much to me. Hanging out Christmas Eve, around the Christmas tree....it is very rare our whole family is together.

So while all the yuckiness IS out there....I just block it out and make it special for my family and I.

But, I respect all of your bah humbugs and agree with many of your points. :) But I just had to share!
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#23 clbevilacqua

 
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Posted 27 November 2006 - 03:56 PM

I think the commercialization is definately out of control but it will continue to be that way as long as society permits it. Though how each person celebrates is totally within their control. My kids get 3 presents at Christmas (if it was good enough for Jesus, it's good enough for them!) and last year they purchased goats, pigs and chickens through World Vision for their grandparents and aunts and uncles. This was their idea and it was their money. World Vision uses the money to purchase the animals for impoverished communities around the world. We also fill several shoe boxes for the Operation Christmas program and try to participate in the Angel Tree. This is not said to brag, I know of many people who do so much, much more-just trying to say that I believe that Christmas is more what you put into it than the commercialization.

Sorry, I just re-read my post and wanted to say that I didn't mean for this to sound "preachy" or anything. Mainly, just that I agree that all the commercial stuff is way way out of hand and that I am sad if you feel bah humbug.
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#24 flagbabyds

 
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Posted 27 November 2006 - 03:57 PM

for christmas this year we are doing we know what we are getting so we know we like what we are getting. my mom is letting us order what we want from the stores we want, she will wrap it up and put it under the tree but we know what we are getting, it's a good way to know what we are getting and give what people want and we kow they will like it.
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Molly

#25 happygirl

 
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Posted 27 November 2006 - 03:59 PM

clbevilacqua,
i don't think your post came across as preachy...I think it exemplifies what the Christmas season, to me (not everyone), should be about.

we better leave otherwise we aren't going to have friends :P
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#26 Jestgar

 
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Posted 27 November 2006 - 04:02 PM

I am looking forward to Christmas. I'll be going to my Mom's house armed with as many gluten-free df goodies as I can come up with!! I love a challenge, and this new way of cooking certainly qualifies.
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"But then, in all honesty, if scientists don't play god, who will?"
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My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating.
- Ashleigh Brilliant

Leap, and the net will appear.

#27 wonkabar

 
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Posted 27 November 2006 - 06:21 PM

I can't bah-humbug because I absolutely, positively love Christmas. BUT, I refuse to over-induldge my kids (they're 3 1/2 and nearly 2). Last year they got such a ridiculous amount of stuff/toys that I wound up returning most of what Santa left at our house from us b/c there was no way that two kids could play with or *needed* that much stuff. This year, the only people that we're letting buy the kids a toy is my in-laws and my brother and sister in-law. We'll be doing Christmas with them so I told them they could buy something for them if they wanted them to be able to open up something other than clothes.

I created a Borders wish list for both of the kids and put lots of books on them. I emailed it to friends and family and included sizes for clothes. I explained that clothes or books would be put to better use and most appreciated. I honestly didn't care if anyone was offended by our "no toys" policy this year...BTW, no one was and they all agreed that the "stuff" gets way too out of hand. Not to mention that my daugther's birthday is December 26! :blink: If I'm gonna over-indulge my kids I'd rather do it with books than crap that they play with for a day and then sits on a shelf for 6 months. Even though we're young (mid-30's) we're both very oldfashioned in that we don't ever want our kids to expect that they will be given things hand over fist simply because they want it. We just don't believe in that. Don't get me wrong, we're very good to our kids and they are very well taken care of, but we have no tolerance for self-entitlement.

After Christmas last year, I donated 4 lawn and leaf bags full of toys and stuff to an organization run by a local church for young, single mothers. I was mortified to see that I was able to bag that much stuff and my kids still had plenty to play with. I truly was bothered by this. Our policy now is also that when something new comes in something "old" goes out and is donated. No child needs that many toys. As mortified as I was, it felt so good to know that I was able to help other children who were not as fortunate as my own. Perspective is a beautiful thing and too many kids are brought up without it.

My brothers and sisters in-law and I have eliminated Christmas and birthday gifts and now only buy for the kids. The six of us decided to go out to dinner in December, without the kids, to celebrate Christmas. We've had a blast doing it! :) Everybody gets phone calls and cards for birthdays which is enough as adults! One of my brothers has a huge Christmas party and every year they get tons of hostess gifts from their guest...nice bottles of wine/vodka, something for the house, etc. My sister in-law always appreciated the thought but wished people just came for the party without bringing things for them...they're in a very "comfortable" financial situation. This year, they included a note with the invitations saying that our presence was gift enough however, if someone was compelled to bring something they'd like it to be a gift for a child 0-15 years-old to be donated to Toys for Tots. I thought this was such a wonderful idea, and I know my sister in-law is so much more comfortable with this idea.
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~Kristy~


Zachary (5 y/o son) -negative labs, no biopsy, gluten-free diet 3/06 with amazing results
*Enterolab testing: auto-immune response, main-Celiac gene/HLA-DQ 2, non-Celiac gluten sensitivity gene/HLA-DQ 3



"Congratulations!
Today is your day.
You're off to Great Places!
You're off and away!"

--Oh The Places You'll Go
by Dr. Seuss

#28 Jestgar

 
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Posted 28 November 2006 - 09:02 AM

If I'm gonna over-indulge my kids I'd rather do it with books than crap....

YEA!!!!!!!
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- Ashleigh Brilliant

Leap, and the net will appear.

#29 wonkabar

 
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Posted 28 November 2006 - 10:38 AM

YEA!!!!!!!

Thanks! :)

(Stepping onto my soapbox for a moment... ;) )When I was still teaching, the K-4 school I worked at started a holiday toy drive for Toys for Tots. I thought it was a wonderful idea until I found out that there was also a contest to win a Beanie Baby. In order to increase the donations, the child's name would be entered to win a "hot" Beanie Baby if they brought in a toy. I couldn't believe they were doing this :angry: My arguement to this was.... how about we teach our kids to be generous and help those less fortunate because it's the right thing to do rather than have an alterior motive. The incentive took away from the whole idea of helping others. I was so aggravated by this. (I'm stepping off of my soapbox now! :lol: )
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~Kristy~


Zachary (5 y/o son) -negative labs, no biopsy, gluten-free diet 3/06 with amazing results
*Enterolab testing: auto-immune response, main-Celiac gene/HLA-DQ 2, non-Celiac gluten sensitivity gene/HLA-DQ 3



"Congratulations!
Today is your day.
You're off to Great Places!
You're off and away!"

--Oh The Places You'll Go
by Dr. Seuss

#30 debmidge

 
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Posted 29 November 2006 - 03:05 AM

I don't mind Christmas starting in November....I am always behind when it comes to holidays and it serves as a good reminder that Christmas is coming, otherwise I'd start my shopping and Christmas cards too late. I am the person who puts the all Christmas music station on in car on 11/22.

This being said, our extreme consumerism isn't healthy. Buy the stuff if you really need and have use for it, but not as a status symbol. This year my gift theme for the nieces & Nephews is "pajamas". Everyone is getting new winter pajamas. Last year was toys -- I am sure those toys are still in good shape so there's no need for new toys. Plus their parents do the toys on Christmas. Last year I purchased lingerie slips for the girls (ages 5 and 6) as this is an item that seems to be gone. For some oddball reason women aren't wearing slips anymore? Well I wanted my nieces to see the practicality and modesty of wearing a slip under a dress or skirt. One of my nieces complains about the interior seams of her dresses and the slip solved the problem for her.

I find that bringing the season on earlier leads to me more time for introspection of life, God, good-will-towards men stuff, I take from the pushing of the season what I want to take from it. I start looking for the Salvation Army people with their kettles and have my dollar bills ready.

Part of the introspection I find is that it helps me to realize that life is good, albeit not perfect and it acts as a calming force.

Remember: Love people, use things.
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Husband has Celiac Disease and
Husband misdiagnosed for 27 yrs -
The misdiagnosis was: IBS or colitis
Mis-diagnosed from 1977 to 2003 by various gastros including one of the largest,
most prestigious medical groups in northern NJ which constantly advertises themselves as
being the "best." This GI told him it was "all in his head."
Serious Depressive state ensued
Finally Diagnosed with celiac disease in 2003
Other food sensitivities: almost all fruits, vegetables, spices, eggs, nuts, yeast, fried foods, roughage, soy.
Needs to gain back at least 25 lbs. of the 40 lbs pounds he lost - lost a great amout of body fat and muscle
Developed neuropathy in 2005
Now has lymphadema 2006
It is my opinion that his subsequent disorders could have been avoided had he been diagnosed sooner by any of the dozen or so doctors he saw between 1977 to 2003




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