Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

Whole Grain Oats...
0

15 posts in this topic

I'm looking at a nature valley, Oats 'n Honey Gronola Bar here.

I know there seems to be some debate about oats in general. The indredients say:

"WHOLE GRAIN ROLLED OATS, SUGAR, CANOLA OIL, CRISP RICE WITH SOY PROTEIN (RICE FLOUR, SOY PROTIEN CONCENTRATE, SUGAR, MALT, SALT) HONEHY, BROWN SUGAR SYRUP, HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP, SALT SOY LECITHIN, BAKING SODA, NATURAL FLAVOR, PEANUT FOUR, ALMOND FLOUR, PECAN FLOUR...

CONTAINS SOY, PEANUT, ALOMOND AND PECAN INGREDIENTS.

Bad...good? Any thoughts. Thanks, Jerry

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

Hi Jerry, This is off limits regardless of the oats because it contains malt. Malt is derived from barley unless stated clearly otherwise. Malt is also the reason we can not eat most mainstream cereals even rice crispies or corn pops.

Atkins used to make a couple of breakfast type bars that were good and were safe although call to make sure they still are before you try them. The strawberry was real good IMHO. In addition Glutino makes a line of filled bars that are okay and there are others.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi Jerry, This is off limits regardless of the oats because it contains malt. Malt is derived from barley unless stated clearly otherwise. Malt is also the reason we can not eat most mainstream cereals even rice crispies or corn pops.

Thanks much. What about just plain oats..Quaker Oats, etc...if you find stuff without malt??

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks much. What about just plain oats..Quaker Oats, etc...if you find stuff without malt??

I wouldn't do Quaker just because of cross-contamination issues. If you want to try oats, try the *real* Irish type oats, but just be forwarned that many people have a reaction to oats because I believe the structure of the protein is similar enough to gluten. (Could be wrong about that last half of the sentence though.)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

oats would normally be a "safe" food, it is considered unsafe because of how the oats are harvested and processed. equipment used to harvest wheat is also is used to harvest oats; then are processed on the same line as the wheat- therefore creating cross contamination (CC). some celiacs are not affected by this- i believe most just stay away for the risk. if you are looking for a breakfast bar, or a "power" bar there are some- Maya, Larabar, Boomi Bars... check out glutenfreemall.com, there is a whole section entitled "bars"

i would suggest printing out the safe and forbidden foods list on this website, they are very helpful- i've been gluten-free since the middle of june- and i still use the lists all of the time!!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




Yep - those particular bars (and many like them) have malt, and the labeling laws don't require any further disclosure than what you see in the ingredients, as malt is usually barley derived, and barley is not one of the eight major allergens.

As for regular whole oats:

1) The Contamination Issue

There is a major cross contamination issue with oats. Given the growing, processing, and packaging conditions for oats, it's no surprise that a study of major brands, including Country Pride, McCanns, and Quaker, have shown *ALL* of those brands to be *CONSISTENTLY* contaminated at levels even above the European CODEX standard of 200ppm. Even Quaker tells Celiacs who call not to use their products due to contamination.

There are two companies in the US, and one in Canada, that produce oats that are managed in a way that is intended to keep them from being contaminated with wheat. GlutenFree Oats is one of them in the US, and Cream Hill Estates is the one in Canada.

2) The Cross Reactivity Issue

The main protein in oats - avenin - has a stretch of amino acids on it that is very similar, chemically and physically, to the stretch of 33 amino acids on the wheat protein - gliadin - that causes the autoimmune reaction. These two portions are less similar than the wheat protein and the barley or rye protein, but much more similar than the wheat protein and rice or corn protein.

Studies have shown that approximately 10% of celiacs react to pure, lab-grown oats with the same villi-damaging autoimmune reaction as with wheat. There is no seriologic test to find out if any particular person is one of this 10%, unfortunately.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a company in Canada that makes gluten-contamination free oats. If you do decide to try oats hoping that you're one of the 90% who won't react, you might be able to find them at a gluten-free/health food-type store. That's where I found mine (and I live in the USA).

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jerry, to summarize what everyone has already said, if you want to try oats, you have to get the ones that are labeled gluten-free. Some people will still react due to the similarity of the oat protein to the wheat protein.

Any oats not labeled gluten-free are most likely contaminated ... that especially includes Quaker ... I won't even eat their rice cakes!!

For other products, you don't necessarily have to look for a marking of "gluten-free", but for oats, you do.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks much. What about just plain oats..Quaker Oats, etc...if you find stuff without malt??

Good news--there is now a company (Gifts of Nature) providing the first certified gluten free oats. I read about this in Living Without Magazine. Evidently, these oats are grown in dedicated fields (as opposed to most oats, which may be grown in fields rotated with wheat crops), and they're processed in dedicated gluten free facilities. Most experts now seem to agree that oats are genetically enough different from wheat/barley/rye glutens that they are safe for celiacs. So, if indeed the cross contamination issue is addressed, like Gifts of Nature claims, their oats should be safe for us. Here's the info:

http://giftsofnature.net/Merchant2/merchan...egory_Code=CGFO

Personally, I've eaten the Irish steel cut oats, as well as Health Valley oatmeal cookies, and have not had problems.

Susanna

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As for regular whole oats:

1) The Contamination Issue

There is a major cross contamination issue with oats. Given the growing, processing, and packaging conditions for oats, it's no surprise that a study of major brands, including Country Pride, McCanns, and Quaker, have shown *ALL* of those brands to be *CONSISTENTLY* contaminated at levels even above the European CODEX standard of 200ppm. Even Quaker tells Celiacs who call not to use their products due to contamination.

There are two companies in the US, and one in Canada, that produce oats that are managed in a way that is intended to keep them from being contaminated with wheat. GlutenFree Oats is one of them in the US, and Cream Hill Estates is the one in Canada.

2) The Cross Reactivity Issue

The main protein in oats - avenin - has a stretch of amino acids on it that is very similar, chemically and physically, to the stretch of 33 amino acids on the wheat protein - gliadin - that causes the autoimmune reaction. These two portions are less similar than the wheat protein and the barley or rye protein, but much more similar than the wheat protein and rice or corn protein.

Studies have shown that approximately 10% of celiacs react to pure, lab-grown oats with the same villi-damaging autoimmune reaction as with wheat. There is no seriologic test to find out if any particular person is one of this 10%, unfortunately.

Thank you for this post - it helped me a lot as I am also new to this! :rolleyes:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Been there, done that... it's a fire waiting to happen :ph34r::angry:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've tried the Gifts of Nature oats..made granola w/ them and it was yummy!! The whole family loved it (2 gluten-free, 2 not). I bought them at a Wild Oats store.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've heard that if you are wondering if you are part of the 10% that react, once your labs are good again, if you wish to try out oats (the noncontaminated kind) you can do so and then get retested labwise to see if your numbers go up or not. Some people who react to gluten or to oats don't show obvious signs. Maybe someone else on here will weigh in on this.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've heard that if you are wondering if you are part of the 10% that react, once your labs are good again, if you wish to try out oats (the noncontaminated kind) you can do so and then get retested labwise to see if your numbers go up or not. Some people who react to gluten or to oats don't show obvious signs. Maybe someone else on here will weigh in on this.

That is an option, and how they determined the issue in the first place. But it's also why I suspect the number is actually higher than 10%. The results came from those who had intestinal damage after a few weeks on daily oats. We know from other studies, and our own experience, that it can take longer than a few weeks of gluten exposure, after having been gluten free, for damage to show up on a biopsy.

If you go this route, it would be similar to a gluten challenge - you would want to eat *a lot* of oats, every day, for a number of months prior to a thorough biopsy, and realize that it might still be a delayed reaction. (There are some reports that damage has not reoccured for years, though it did end up occuring again.)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm looking at a nature valley, Oats 'n Honey Gronola Bar here.

I know there seems to be some debate about oats in general. The indredients say:

"WHOLE GRAIN ROLLED OATS, SUGAR, CANOLA OIL, CRISP RICE WITH SOY PROTEIN (RICE FLOUR, SOY PROTIEN CONCENTRATE, SUGAR, MALT, SALT) HONEHY, BROWN SUGAR SYRUP, HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP, SALT SOY LECITHIN, BAKING SODA, NATURAL FLAVOR, PEANUT FOUR, ALMOND FLOUR, PECAN FLOUR...

CONTAINS SOY, PEANUT, ALOMOND AND PECAN INGREDIENTS.

Bad...good? Any thoughts. Thanks, Jerry

Jerry,

I am very new to this, as my daughter was recently diagnosed. Acording to an article I read, this is really crazy, the FDA is sitting on the fence about oats. Outside the USA the guidelines for Celiac are different. Some countries say ok, some say no. Cereal? Believe it or not, at the moment TRIX is gluten free, I just called and bought a box for my daughter. The store I have been shopping at has alot of gluten-free foods. Adult cereal and kids. NO MALT.... If you go to a dietician, they can sometimes give you a list of stuff that are no=no's. and stuff that is ok, good to avoid.. i got that for my daughter. we take it shopping with us. Good luck..

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      104,334
    • Total Posts
      920,437
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Thank you cyclinglady! We'll just keep pushing forward and we'll get things figured out one way or another. You have been most helpful and informative and given me some great resources and things to consider. I really appreciate it! I definitely feel better as I've felt like a crazy mom lately thinking through the test results and everything. Even if it turns out to not be celiac or gluten related, at least I can say we did our due diligence and looked under every rock to find the source of his troubles. Thanks again!  Take care! 
    • Anxiety is quite a common symptom with undiagnosed celiacs. It should improve if not disappear when you go gluten free. Be sure to CONTINUE eating gluten until the endoscopy!   Welcome to the club!
    • Although serological tests are useful for identifying celiac disease, it is well known that a small minority of celiacs are seronegative, and show no blood markers for celiac disease. A team of researchers wanted to define the prevalence and features of seronegative compared to seropositive celiac disease, and to establish whether celiac disease is a common cause of seronegative villous atrophy. View the full article
    • This was absolutely me before diagnosis.  The worst of all of my Celiac symptoms occurred in the morning.  The anxiety was terrible in the mornings, I had horrible nausea, no appetite, felt light headed, dizzy and shaky, diarrhea, stomach cramps... the works.  Honestly, I don't know if it was the symptoms causing the anxiety, the anxiety making my symptoms worse, or a combination.  I almost dropped out of school because I felt so terrible every morning I didn't want to leave the house to go to class.  The first few doctors I saw insisted all of my symptoms were psychological and tried to give me anti-depressants/anti-anxiety meds, but I knew there was something else wrong with me.  I had always been a bit "high-strung," but for the year I was really sick before diagnosis, the anxiety got out of control. I was diagnosed with celiac disease 6 months ago and have been gluten free ever since.  It took time, but everything is gradually improving.  The morning anxiety is much improved and some mornings, is completely gone.  I realized a month or two ago that I no longer spend the first hour after waking up gagging and dry-heaving, something I had done for so many years that I just thought it was normal for me.  I can brush my teeth and my tongue without feeling like I'm going to puke.  I eat breakfast now, which I have never done, because I was always too anxious and nauseous in the mornings to be hungry.  I am not "all better."  I still have bad days and even bad weeks.  If I get glutened the anxiety comes back full force.  If I'm super-stressed out or letting my health slide (not eating well, not sleeping enough) the AM anxiety seems to return.  But, it has been slowly improving over the last 6 months and has become so much more manageable.   Your anxiety could be a separate disorder from the celiac disease, but for me, it seems it was absolutely related and continues to get better.  Don't get discouraged if you don't see an immediate improvement or experience relapses after improving.  Often, I feel like it's a two-step-forward, one-step-back kind of thing, but it is getting better.
    • I have suffered with GERD for 20 years and accidently found out it was a gluten intolerance. I had gone on Atkins years ago and noticed that I had no GERD symptoms while on the diet. I didn't make the connection at that time. Then I went on the Mayo Diet back in the winter and once again, the constant was having no bread primarily. I had also noticed that I would have major attacks anytime I ate Italian food. I blamed it on the onions, the tomatoes, herbs...but I could tolerate all those foods separately. Then, like a lightning bolt...it hit me...the culprit was the "innocent" pasta. BINGO!!  I went gluten-free in March 2016 and I have had no GERD now in 5 months. I feel as if it is a gift to me.   
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      61,389
    • Most Online
      1,763

    Newest Member
    EJ653
    Joined