Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

Addison Disease In Relation To Celiac Disease
0

12 posts in this topic

I have been researching because of continuing symptoms.

Addison's Disease is adrenal failure, yet the symptoms are very much like Celiac. Both are autoinmunes.

Do anyone have a history or information on Addison's.

Thanks

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

bump? any information out there?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know a lot about Addisons but I have adrenal insufficency which some Drs say is an early stage of Addisons. AI is very common with low Thyroid - not sure about Celiac.

I just had the salt craving and low blood pressure, and pain a bit like Fibromylagia. I was tested for AI by a blood test and also saliva testing.

Addison

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lisa,

Dr. Green's book has a chapter on Celiac and related disorders. I believe Addison's is in there. I am already in bed with the computer, but I will check it out, hopefully tomorrow after work, and fill ya in on what it says :).

All I found on celiac.com was:

http://www.celiac.com/st_prod.html?p_prodi...-40107470145.fc

http://www.celiac.com/st_prod.html?p_prodi...-40107470145.fc

this one sort of references it: http://www.celiac.com/st_prod.html?p_prodi...-40107470145.fc

Here is from pubmed:

Scand J Gastroenterol. 2006 Mar;41(3):302-5. Links

Prevalence of coeliac disease in Italian patients affected by Addison's disease.Biagi F, Campanella J, Soriani A, Vailati A, Corazza GR.

1st Department of Internal Medicine, IRCCS Policlinico San MatteoUniversity of Pavia, Italy. f.biagi@smatteo.pv.it

OBJECTIVE: It is well known that coeliac disease is associated with autoimmune endocrine diseases, such as autoimmune thyroid disease and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Recently, coeliac disease has been shown in approximately 10% of patients with autoimmune Addison's disease. Addison's disease is the most common cause of primary adrenocortical insufficiency and it shares several clinical features with coeliac disease. Although hyperpigmentation and hypotension are the most specific signs, gastrointestinal symptoms are common and can be the first complaints of the patients. The aim of our study was to investigate the prevalence of coeliac disease in Italian patients with Addison's disease. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Seventeen consecutive patients affected by Addison's disease (14 F, mean age 53.9 years, range 26-79 years) were enrolled in the study. Eleven of them were affected by Addison's disease associated with autoimmune thyroid disease and/or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus; the other 6 patients were suffering from isolated Addison's disease. Diagnosis had been performed at the age of 40.5 years (range 23-55). Steroid treatment had already been started in 16 of the patients. Endomysial antibodies were tested in all of them and a duodenal biopsy was taken in those found to be positive for antiendomysial antibody (EMA). RESULTS: One out of 17 patients was found to be EMA positive. Duodenal biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of coeliac disease by showing subtotal villous atrophy. CONCLUSIONS: Although we studied only a small sample, our preliminary results confirmed that Addison's disease is associated with coeliac disease, being present in 5.9% of patients with Addison's disease. Since the symptoms can be similar and treatment of Addison's disease can mask coeliac disease, this association should always be actively investigated.

Eur J Endocrinol. 2006 Feb;154(2):275-9. Links

Celiac disease in North Italian patients with autoimmune Addison's disease.Betterle C, Lazzarotto F, Spadaccino AC, Basso D, Plebani M, Pedini B, Chiarelli S, Albergoni M.

Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Padua Medical School, Via Ospedale Civile 105, 35100 Padua, Italy. corrado.betterle@unipd.it

OBJECTIVE: Patients with autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) are prone to develop other autoimmune manifestations. An increased prevalence of celiac disease (celiac disease) has recently been demonstrated in Northern European patients with AAD. IgA deficiency is the most frequent type of immunodeficiency among humans and is present in about one in every 600 individuals in the population. IgA deficiency is frequent in patients with other autoimmune diseases, but data concerning AAD are still unavailable. DESIGN: The aim was to define the prevalence of celiac disease and of IgA deficiency in a group of Italian patients with AAD. METHODS: One hundred and nine patients with AAD were enrolled and examined for tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies of the IgA class, circulating levels of IgA and adrenal cortex antibodies. RESULTS: Two (1.8%) of the patients were affected by already diagnosed celiac disease and were already on a gluten-free diet. Out of the remaining 107 patients, four (3.7%) were found to be positive for IgA antibodies to human tissue transglutaminase. Three of the four patients who were positive for tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies agreed to undergo endoscopy and duodenal biopsies and, in one, a latent form of celiac disease was identified. The clinical, silent or latent form of celiac disease was present in six out of 109 (5.4%). This prevalence was significantly higher (P = 0.0001) than that reported for the Northern Italian population which was equal to 0.063%. Specifically, celiac disease was present in 12.5% of the autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) type 1 cases, in four out of 60 (6.7%) of the APS type 2 cases and in one out of 40 (2.5%) of the isolated AAD cases. IgA deficiency was present in two out of 109 patients (1.8%), all of whom had normal IgG anti-gliadin. Autoantibodies to the adrenal cortex were detected in 81 out of 109 patients (74.3%). CONCLUSIONS: In patients with AAD there is a high prevalence of both celiac disease and IgA deficiency. Consequently, it is important to screen for celiac disease with tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies of the IgA class and for IgA levels.

Scand J Gastroenterol. 2003 May;38(5):511-5. Links

High frequency of coeliac disease among patients with autoimmune adrenocortical failure.Myhre AG, Aarsetoy H, Undlien DE, Hovdenak N, Aksnes L, Husebye ES.

Division of Endocrinology, Dept. of Paediatrics, Institute of Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. Anne.Myhre@med.uib.no

BACKGROUND: Coeliac disease (celiac disease) is an autoimmune disease of the small intestine caused by gluten ingestion in genetically predisposed subjects. It can occur isolated or in combination with other autoimmune diseases. Autoimmune Addison's disease is frequently associated with other organ-specific autoimmune diseases. We have investigated the prevalence of celiac disease among a large cohort of patients with autoimmune Addison's disease. METHODS: Seventy-six patients (44 women) with Addison's disease, 52% of whom had polyendocrine failure, were recruited from a registry of organ-specific autoimmune diseases in Norway. All sera were analysed for antibodies against gliadin (AGA), endomysium (EMA) and tissue transglutaminase (tTG). Patients with positive EMA and/or anti-tTG were offered endoscopy. The human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II genotypes were determined. RESULTS: Five patients had antibodies against both endomysium and tissue transglutaminase. In these five patients, celiac disease was verified by biopsy. One patient had known celiac disease prior to the study. All six patients with celiac disease carried the celiac disease-associated HLA haplotype DR3-DQ2. The total prevalence of celiac disease was 7.9%. CONCLUSION: celiac disease is frequently associated with Addison's disease. The risk of developing celiac disease seems to be higher than can be explained by the common DR3-DQ2 association alone. It is often asymptomatic or associated with unspecific symptoms. Addison patients should be screened for the presence of celiac disease on a regular basis.

QJM. 2002 Feb;95(2):79-82. Links

Coeliac disease and autoimmune Addison's disease: a clinical pitfall.O'Leary C, Walsh CH, Wieneke P, O'Regan P, Buckley B, O'Halloran DJ, Ferriss JB, Quigley EM, Annis P, Shanahan F, Cronin CC.

Department of Medicine, National University of Ireland, Cork, Ireland.

BACKGROUND: Coeliac disease has an increased prevalence in a number of autoimmune endocrine conditions. An association between coeliac disease and Addison's disease has been proposed in isolated case reports, but has not been formally studied. AIM: To investigate the extent of this association. DESIGN: Prospective screening of patients with confirmed Addison's disease. METHODS: From central computerized records, we identified all living patients with a diagnosis of autoimmune Addison's disease in the past 30 years and presently attending our affiliated hospitals. After exclusions, 44 were invited to attend for screening. RESULTS: Of 41 patients screened, five (12.2%) had coeliac disease: Three were previously diagnosed coeliacs and this was confirmed on review, including examination of biopsy material. A further two had positive IgA-endomysial antibodies. Histological confirmation was obtained in both cases. Neither had laboratory or clinical evidence of malabsorption. DISCUSSION: In this series of patients with Addison's disease, a higher co-morbidity with coeliac disease was observed than in any previously studied endocrine condition. We recommend that coeliac serology (anti-endomysial and tissue transglutaminase antibody) testing be incorporated routinely into the autoimmune screen for other conditions in patients with Addison's disease.

Dig Dis Sci. 1999 Jul;44(7):1428-33. Links

Comment in:

Dig Dis Sci. 2000 Jul;45(7):1470-1.

Celiac disease and autoimmune endocrinologic disorders.Kaukinen K, Collin P, Mykkanen AH, Partanen J, Maki M, Salmi J.

Department of Internal Medicine, Tampere University Hospital, Finland.

Patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, autoimmune thyroid disease, Addison's disease, and alopecia areata are at increased risk of celiac disease. We investigated whether patients with more than one autoimmune endocrinologic disorder are even more susceptible to celiac disease or have celiac-type mucosal inflammation. All 62 patients found to have such multiple diseases in 1994-1996 were investigated. Small bowel biopsy was performed on all voluntary nonceliac subjects. The villous structure and density of intraepithelial lymphocytes were examined, and HLA-DQ alleles were determined. Seven (11%) patients had celiac disease: six cases were detected earlier and there was one new case; in addition, two had minor villous deterioration and five an increased density of mucosal intraepithelial gammadelta+ T-cells. HLA-DQ2 or DQ8 alleles were found in all subjects with mucosal changes. Patients with multiple autoimmune disorders clearly run an increased risk of developing celiac disease, and some of them have minor mucosal changes compatible with the early signs of the disease.

(there are more studies...these are just a few abstracts. go to pubmed.com and it will route you to its site, and search for celiac and addison, and you will see these and others)

Hope this helps,

Laura

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Laura, lots to digest....ohf, "patients, cure they selves"!!!!!!!!!

Thanks Laura for you time and effort. I will study more in the am.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




you are more than welcome.

JFK had Addison's. Some have speculated that he also had Celiac based on his symptoms and the connection to Addison's. This is an article written by one of my favorite Celiac experts, Dr. Green: http://www.celiac.com/st_prod.html?p_prodid=754

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a friend with Addison's disease and she doesn't have celiac.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have been researching because of continuing symptoms.

Addison's Disease is adrenal failure, yet the symptoms are very much like Celiac. Both are autoinmunes.

Do anyone have a history or information on Addison's.

Thanks

Yes, the symptoms are very much like Celiac. My daughter went undiagnosed for years. We thought her Celiac was just not getting better. Last summer she got a really nice bronze tan. She is red headed and fair skinned. Her endo ran the blood test and low and behold she had Addison's.

Here are some links to websites that have info about addison's disease.

http://mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk/addiso...work/enter.html

http://www.adshg.org.uk/index.html

http://www.drkaslow.com/html/adrenal_insufficiency.html

http://www.medhelp.org/www/nadf/

http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/Addisons_Disease/ this is an Addison's Disease online support group.

Hope this helps!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi - I have a linea nigra, that brown line that extends down from your belly button when you get pregnant.

Only problem is, I'm not pregnant (no chance whatsoever) and have never been pregnant. I read that this is a form of hyperpigmentation. I know that Addison's causes hyperpigmentation.

Anyone ever heard of Addison's causing linea nigra in particular?

This is so peculiar. It makes me feel real down. There's a lot of stuff I've had that I've never thought anything about until I got sick and started researching terms I didn't understand. All the cross referencing has keyed me into stuff I always just took for granted.

I also have - don't know if I'm saying this right - orthostatic something or other. Sometimes I get dizzy when I stand. It has caused some scary incidents in the shower in particular - I wobbled back and forth and then fell like a rigid ton of bricks. I was fortunate I didn't hit my head on the way down. Also, I seem to have low blood volume - when I give blood, it just barely trickles or spurts out, and they tell me I'm dehydrated. And sometimes my heart races. Is any of that normal?

Can those things be related to Addison's? What's going on?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I too have been wondering if I am also suffering from Addison's disease. I go back to my doctor tomorrow and am going to ask him to check my cortisol levels. My health severely diminished about 2 months ago and have had to go on medical leave due to D, weight loss, nausea, loss of appetite, dehydration etc. We immediately suspected Celiac because I had always had some GI issues as well as autoimmune issues. I have gone gluten and casein free even though my blood tests were negative. My other health problems and fibromyalgia-like symptoms seem to be improving but these new severe symptoms are not and no one seems to know what is going on. I don't in particular have hyperpigmentation either but I seem to have all of the other symptoms. I'll let you know how it goes, I'd be curious to know if you find out anything else.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I also have - don't know if I'm saying this right - orthostatic something or other. Sometimes I get dizzy when I stand.

Would this be orthostatic postural hypotension? That means that your blood pressure goes DOWN when you stand up, and not enough blood gets to your head (at least, that's how it was explained to me).

Could it also be somehow related to thyroid?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Would this be orthostatic postural hypotension? That means that your blood pressure goes DOWN when you stand up, and not enough blood gets to your head (at least, that's how it was explained to me).

Could it also be somehow related to thyroid?

Yeah, it's orthostatic hypotension. After reading your question as to whether or not it could be related to thyroid, I did an Internet search and found that it can.

Check out this web page:

http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/dci/Diseas...hyp_causes.html

I just wonder about my linea nigra - that brown line on my belly pregnant women are supposed to get - and I'm not pregnant. Makes me wonder. Hmmm.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      103,663
    • Total Posts
      918,518
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Coping with gas!?
      Hi everyone,  I hope you're all having a better Tuesday than me :P. So after nearly 2 years of knowing that I am most likely Celiac, I have narrowed down my reactions to gluten into three categories. 1. When I realize I accidently ate a significant amount of gluten. Symptoms are pretty immediate and almost identical to the stomach flu- vomiting, terrible stomach pain, body aches, lower back and knee pain, headache and stiffness, diarrhea. This will usually last about 24 hours before I can start trying to eat food again. 2. When I realize I ate a small amount of gluten (i.e. a hidden ingredient in something). The most prominent symptom here is a burning pain in my lower abdomen.  3. When I know I must have eaten something off but cannot identify it. This is usually a more mild version of 1 and 2. Mostly nausea, tiredness, stomach discomfort, and a ridiculous amount of terrible smelling gas.  Today is a number 3 day. It has felt like my stomach has been constantly churning all day. I keep on feeling like I'm finally going to poop but then it's just gas. Just like the rest of my symptoms, I have absolutely no idea what to do for this! Are there any products you guys could recommend for settling my stomach and relieving the gas? Also, if you have any suggestions for #1 and 2 I would so gladly appreciate it! Doctors have been thoroughly unhelpful with symptom relief. "Just don't eat gluten" is their suggestion. If only they knew how it feels to get glutened... Thanks guys! Kristen 
    • Gluten ataxia?
      I have Celiac Disease and Diabetes.  Sounds to me like you're experiencing a low blood sugar episode.  Did anyone test your blood glucose level during your hospital visit?   When I get low, I get the drunk-wonky vision, too.  After going gluten-free, I found I had to eat more often to avoid those crashes.  I sometimes wake to a crash just like you did.  Have honey or other sweet next to bedside just in case.  If you get too low you will pass out. Low cost blood glucose meters are available at drug stores.  I suggest you get one just to rule low blood sugar out.    Many blessings
    • Celiac - Not yet diagnosed but feel like I'm dying.
      Hi Dylan I just wanted to join SLLRunner in welcoming you to the forum and yes, do ask to be tested for Celiac and Chrons. My nutritionalist told me that celiac disease is a great mimicker of many illnesses which I think must make a doctor's job all the harder when it comes to diagnosis.  For many of us it took us  a long time to get a diagnosis - for about eight years before my own diagnosis I had ulcers,  odd migraines and hallucinations on waking, anxiety, elevated blood protein but no obvious cause for it, anemia, numb hands and arms in the mornings, and eventually the abdominal pain and severe diarrhea. It was all scary stuff but  it was only when I got the last two symptoms, for six weeks, that I was tested for celiac disease (for the protocol here in the UK is that if you have a new gastric symptom for more than six weeks you should have further investigations).  I still wonder if I hadn't had that gastric pain and diarrhea whether my doctors would have even thought it was celiac related? After all you have been through it is not surprising that you are feeling depressed.  A lot of people feel very depressed and anxious before their diagnosis.  You are doing the right thing seeing a new doctor, and hopefully you are just around the corner from getting some long awaited answers.   Keep us posted.  You will find  some great advice here and support during your journey.  All the very best.
    • Costco
      This forum post came up when I Google searched Kirkland Dish Soap. I called them today and they said there is no gluten in the dish soap. Janis 
    • Food tolerance issues post-diagnosis
      In light of the studies that found some probiotics that are labeled gluten-free yet tested over 20ppm I wouldn't touch them. Now those would be the powder or pill forms. Yogurt is not affected by that. Since you don't have a problem with dairy then I would say eat some yogurt every day. I like Chobani Greek because it has more kinds of cultures. Remember now that powder or pill forms of probiotics do not come under the gluten-free labeling law. The same for OTC & prescription meds. You need to check every single one of those. There are a few online sites where you can check things like that or ask here but as far as prescription meds -- call the manufacturer EVERY TIME. I also wanted to tell you in case you didn't already know that since celiac is genetic and can present at ANY age then all your first degree relatives need to be tested every 2 years in the absence of symptoms and immediately if symptoms present between the 2 year periods. As far as the digestive enzymes go, I tried Digest Gold for a short time & it really didn't seem to do anything for me however I will say I had a lot of issues going on at the time so I might not know if they helped or not. I decided to quit them in order to take that out of the equation so I could try to pin down what was causing me distress. The fewer things in the mix you know. I have heard people report the same as your consultant said. Some say they helped & some say they didn't. Remember Jammy, you're just in the beginning stages. I KNOW you want to heal & heal FAST. Been there, done that! It's like this: you didn't get sick overnight & you're not going to heal overnight. Patience is the watchword here. It's hard I know! You just want to get on with your life. We can all relate.  Again, I'm going to say to eat foods easy on your gut. WELL cooked foods. No raw carrots, coconut, nuts & stuff like that. Easier on your gut would be nut butters.... peanut butter, cashew butter, almond butter etc.... It's sort of like being a baby ---  soft, easy to digest foods. Bone broth is a great healer for you gut & extremely nutritious as well as being easy on the digestion. Here's just one recipe: http://wellnessmama.com/5888/how-to-make-bone-broth/
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

    • celiac sharon  »  cyclinglady

      Hello cycling lady, have you noticed my picture is showing up as you?  Have no idea why but it's rather disconcerting to see my picture and your words 😉  Do you know how to fix it?  You seem to have far more experience with this board than I do
      · 1 reply
    • Larry Gessner  »  cyclinglady

      Hi There, I don't know if there is a place for videos in the forum. I just watched "The Truth About Gluten" I think it is a good video. I would like to share it somewhere but don't know where it should go. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
      Here is the link if you have never watched it.
      https://youtu.be/IU6jVEwpjnE Thank You,
      Larry
      · 2 replies
    • ChiaChick  »  Peaceflower

      Hi Peaceflower, Just wanted to say thank you for the chat.
      · 0 replies
  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      60,751
    • Most Online
      1,763

    Newest Member
    The sweet cheeks
    Joined