Jump to content

Follow Us:  Twitter Facebook RSS Feed            




   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

Addison Disease In Relation To Celiac Disease


  • Please log in to reply

11 replies to this topic

#1 Lisa

 
Lisa

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,802 posts
 

Posted 04 January 2007 - 01:15 PM

I have been researching because of continuing symptoms.

Addison's Disease is adrenal failure, yet the symptoms are very much like Celiac. Both are autoinmunes.

Do anyone have a history or information on Addison's.

Thanks
  • 0
Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#2 Lisa

 
Lisa

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,802 posts
 

Posted 04 January 2007 - 03:35 PM

bump? any information out there?
  • 0
Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

#3 georgie

 
georgie

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 963 posts
 

Posted 04 January 2007 - 05:39 PM

I don't know a lot about Addisons but I have adrenal insufficency which some Drs say is an early stage of Addisons. AI is very common with low Thyroid - not sure about Celiac.

I just had the salt craving and low blood pressure, and pain a bit like Fibromylagia. I was tested for AI by a blood test and also saliva testing.

Addison’s disease is not usually apparent until over 90% of the adrenal cortex has been destroyed, so that very little adrenal capacity is left. This can take months to years and is known as primary adrenal insufficiency. Symptoms of the disease, once advanced, can include severe fatigue and weakness, loss of weight, increased pigmentation of the skin, faintness and low blood pressure, nausea, vomiting, salt cravings and painful muscles and joints. Because of the rather non-specific nature of these symptoms and their slow progression, they are often missed or ignored until, for example, a relatively minor infection leads to an abnormally long convalescence which prompts an investigation. Frequently, it is not until a crisis is precipitated that attention is turned to the adrenals.
  • 0


Diagnosed May 2006 - Hashimotos Thyroid after being diagnosed in 1977 and told it didn't matter.
Diagnosed June 2006 with adrenal insufficiency.
Diagnosed June 2006 as Gluten Intolerant after I failed the Challenge Diet. Negative blood test.No biopsy.
Diagnosed June 2006 as B12 low. Needed weekly injections for a year.Still have them every 2 weeks.
Trialled Dairy Free Diet and reacted positively to that challenge in January 07.
News Flash! Coeliac Genetic Testing done April 08 . DQ2 Positive !
Diagnosed July 2010 FODMAP. Limits on Fructose, lactose, polyols, fructans. NO ONION! But I can have hard cheese, butter and cream again!!!

#4 happygirl

 
happygirl

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,942 posts
 

Posted 04 January 2007 - 05:53 PM

Lisa,
Dr. Green's book has a chapter on Celiac and related disorders. I believe Addison's is in there. I am already in bed with the computer, but I will check it out, hopefully tomorrow after work, and fill ya in on what it says :).

All I found on celiac.com was:
http://www.celiac.co...-40107470145.fc
http://www.celiac.co...-40107470145.fc
this one sort of references it: http://www.celiac.co...-40107470145.fc

Here is from pubmed:

Scand J Gastroenterol. 2006 Mar;41(3):302-5. Links
Prevalence of coeliac disease in Italian patients affected by Addison's disease.Biagi F, Campanella J, Soriani A, Vailati A, Corazza GR.
1st Department of Internal Medicine, IRCCS Policlinico San MatteoUniversity of Pavia, Italy. f.biagi@smatteo.pv.it

OBJECTIVE: It is well known that coeliac disease is associated with autoimmune endocrine diseases, such as autoimmune thyroid disease and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Recently, coeliac disease has been shown in approximately 10% of patients with autoimmune Addison's disease. Addison's disease is the most common cause of primary adrenocortical insufficiency and it shares several clinical features with coeliac disease. Although hyperpigmentation and hypotension are the most specific signs, gastrointestinal symptoms are common and can be the first complaints of the patients. The aim of our study was to investigate the prevalence of coeliac disease in Italian patients with Addison's disease. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Seventeen consecutive patients affected by Addison's disease (14 F, mean age 53.9 years, range 26-79 years) were enrolled in the study. Eleven of them were affected by Addison's disease associated with autoimmune thyroid disease and/or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus; the other 6 patients were suffering from isolated Addison's disease. Diagnosis had been performed at the age of 40.5 years (range 23-55). Steroid treatment had already been started in 16 of the patients. Endomysial antibodies were tested in all of them and a duodenal biopsy was taken in those found to be positive for antiendomysial antibody (EMA). RESULTS: One out of 17 patients was found to be EMA positive. Duodenal biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of coeliac disease by showing subtotal villous atrophy. CONCLUSIONS: Although we studied only a small sample, our preliminary results confirmed that Addison's disease is associated with coeliac disease, being present in 5.9% of patients with Addison's disease. Since the symptoms can be similar and treatment of Addison's disease can mask coeliac disease, this association should always be actively investigated.

Eur J Endocrinol. 2006 Feb;154(2):275-9. Links
Celiac disease in North Italian patients with autoimmune Addison's disease.Betterle C, Lazzarotto F, Spadaccino AC, Basso D, Plebani M, Pedini B, Chiarelli S, Albergoni M.
Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Padua Medical School, Via Ospedale Civile 105, 35100 Padua, Italy. corrado.betterle@unipd.it

OBJECTIVE: Patients with autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) are prone to develop other autoimmune manifestations. An increased prevalence of celiac disease (celiac disease) has recently been demonstrated in Northern European patients with AAD. IgA deficiency is the most frequent type of immunodeficiency among humans and is present in about one in every 600 individuals in the population. IgA deficiency is frequent in patients with other autoimmune diseases, but data concerning AAD are still unavailable. DESIGN: The aim was to define the prevalence of celiac disease and of IgA deficiency in a group of Italian patients with AAD. METHODS: One hundred and nine patients with AAD were enrolled and examined for tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies of the IgA class, circulating levels of IgA and adrenal cortex antibodies. RESULTS: Two (1.8%) of the patients were affected by already diagnosed celiac disease and were already on a gluten-free diet. Out of the remaining 107 patients, four (3.7%) were found to be positive for IgA antibodies to human tissue transglutaminase. Three of the four patients who were positive for tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies agreed to undergo endoscopy and duodenal biopsies and, in one, a latent form of celiac disease was identified. The clinical, silent or latent form of celiac disease was present in six out of 109 (5.4%). This prevalence was significantly higher (P = 0.0001) than that reported for the Northern Italian population which was equal to 0.063%. Specifically, celiac disease was present in 12.5% of the autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) type 1 cases, in four out of 60 (6.7%) of the APS type 2 cases and in one out of 40 (2.5%) of the isolated AAD cases. IgA deficiency was present in two out of 109 patients (1.8%), all of whom had normal IgG anti-gliadin. Autoantibodies to the adrenal cortex were detected in 81 out of 109 patients (74.3%). CONCLUSIONS: In patients with AAD there is a high prevalence of both celiac disease and IgA deficiency. Consequently, it is important to screen for celiac disease with tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies of the IgA class and for IgA levels.

Scand J Gastroenterol. 2003 May;38(5):511-5. Links
High frequency of coeliac disease among patients with autoimmune adrenocortical failure.Myhre AG, Aarsetoy H, Undlien DE, Hovdenak N, Aksnes L, Husebye ES.
Division of Endocrinology, Dept. of Paediatrics, Institute of Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. Anne.Myhre@med.uib.no

BACKGROUND: Coeliac disease (celiac disease) is an autoimmune disease of the small intestine caused by gluten ingestion in genetically predisposed subjects. It can occur isolated or in combination with other autoimmune diseases. Autoimmune Addison's disease is frequently associated with other organ-specific autoimmune diseases. We have investigated the prevalence of celiac disease among a large cohort of patients with autoimmune Addison's disease. METHODS: Seventy-six patients (44 women) with Addison's disease, 52% of whom had polyendocrine failure, were recruited from a registry of organ-specific autoimmune diseases in Norway. All sera were analysed for antibodies against gliadin (AGA), endomysium (EMA) and tissue transglutaminase (tTG). Patients with positive EMA and/or anti-tTG were offered endoscopy. The human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II genotypes were determined. RESULTS: Five patients had antibodies against both endomysium and tissue transglutaminase. In these five patients, celiac disease was verified by biopsy. One patient had known celiac disease prior to the study. All six patients with celiac disease carried the celiac disease-associated HLA haplotype DR3-DQ2. The total prevalence of celiac disease was 7.9%. CONCLUSION: celiac disease is frequently associated with Addison's disease. The risk of developing celiac disease seems to be higher than can be explained by the common DR3-DQ2 association alone. It is often asymptomatic or associated with unspecific symptoms. Addison patients should be screened for the presence of celiac disease on a regular basis.

QJM. 2002 Feb;95(2):79-82. Links
Coeliac disease and autoimmune Addison's disease: a clinical pitfall.O'Leary C, Walsh CH, Wieneke P, O'Regan P, Buckley B, O'Halloran DJ, Ferriss JB, Quigley EM, Annis P, Shanahan F, Cronin CC.
Department of Medicine, National University of Ireland, Cork, Ireland.

BACKGROUND: Coeliac disease has an increased prevalence in a number of autoimmune endocrine conditions. An association between coeliac disease and Addison's disease has been proposed in isolated case reports, but has not been formally studied. AIM: To investigate the extent of this association. DESIGN: Prospective screening of patients with confirmed Addison's disease. METHODS: From central computerized records, we identified all living patients with a diagnosis of autoimmune Addison's disease in the past 30 years and presently attending our affiliated hospitals. After exclusions, 44 were invited to attend for screening. RESULTS: Of 41 patients screened, five (12.2%) had coeliac disease: Three were previously diagnosed coeliacs and this was confirmed on review, including examination of biopsy material. A further two had positive IgA-endomysial antibodies. Histological confirmation was obtained in both cases. Neither had laboratory or clinical evidence of malabsorption. DISCUSSION: In this series of patients with Addison's disease, a higher co-morbidity with coeliac disease was observed than in any previously studied endocrine condition. We recommend that coeliac serology (anti-endomysial and tissue transglutaminase antibody) testing be incorporated routinely into the autoimmune screen for other conditions in patients with Addison's disease.

Dig Dis Sci. 1999 Jul;44(7):1428-33. Links
Comment in:
Dig Dis Sci. 2000 Jul;45(7):1470-1.
Celiac disease and autoimmune endocrinologic disorders.Kaukinen K, Collin P, Mykkanen AH, Partanen J, Maki M, Salmi J.
Department of Internal Medicine, Tampere University Hospital, Finland.

Patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, autoimmune thyroid disease, Addison's disease, and alopecia areata are at increased risk of celiac disease. We investigated whether patients with more than one autoimmune endocrinologic disorder are even more susceptible to celiac disease or have celiac-type mucosal inflammation. All 62 patients found to have such multiple diseases in 1994-1996 were investigated. Small bowel biopsy was performed on all voluntary nonceliac subjects. The villous structure and density of intraepithelial lymphocytes were examined, and HLA-DQ alleles were determined. Seven (11%) patients had celiac disease: six cases were detected earlier and there was one new case; in addition, two had minor villous deterioration and five an increased density of mucosal intraepithelial gammadelta+ T-cells. HLA-DQ2 or DQ8 alleles were found in all subjects with mucosal changes. Patients with multiple autoimmune disorders clearly run an increased risk of developing celiac disease, and some of them have minor mucosal changes compatible with the early signs of the disease.


(there are more studies...these are just a few abstracts. go to pubmed.com and it will route you to its site, and search for celiac and addison, and you will see these and others)

Hope this helps,
Laura
  • 0

#5 Lisa

 
Lisa

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,802 posts
 

Posted 04 January 2007 - 06:21 PM

Thanks Laura, lots to digest....ohf, "patients, cure they selves"!!!!!!!!!

Thanks Laura for you time and effort. I will study more in the am.
  • 0
Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

#6 happygirl

 
happygirl

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,942 posts
 

Posted 04 January 2007 - 06:49 PM

you are more than welcome.

JFK had Addison's. Some have speculated that he also had Celiac based on his symptoms and the connection to Addison's. This is an article written by one of my favorite Celiac experts, Dr. Green: http://www.celiac.co...ml?p_prodid=754
  • 0

#7 Felidae

 
Felidae

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,098 posts
 

Posted 05 January 2007 - 10:28 AM

I have a friend with Addison's disease and she doesn't have celiac.
  • 0
Tapioca intolerant
First cousin dx'd with Celiac Disease
Grandmother died of malnutrition b/c everything made her sick... sounds like celiac to me.
Gluten-free since June 2005
Dx with IBS February 2005
Blood tests both negative (or inconclusive?) for celiac (in 2002 and 2004)

#8 jmj0803

 
jmj0803

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 39 posts
 

Posted 11 February 2007 - 12:03 PM

I have been researching because of continuing symptoms.

Addison's Disease is adrenal failure, yet the symptoms are very much like Celiac. Both are autoinmunes.

Do anyone have a history or information on Addison's.

Thanks


Yes, the symptoms are very much like Celiac. My daughter went undiagnosed for years. We thought her Celiac was just not getting better. Last summer she got a really nice bronze tan. She is red headed and fair skinned. Her endo ran the blood test and low and behold she had Addison's.

Here are some links to websites that have info about addison's disease.

http://mysite.wanado...work/enter.html
http://www.adshg.org.uk/index.html
http://www.drkaslow....ufficiency.html
http://www.medhelp.org/www/nadf/
http://health.groups...disons_Disease/ this is an Addison's Disease online support group.

Hope this helps!
  • 0
Jessica

Daughter
9/05 Diagnosed Hypothyroidism
2/16/05 Biopsy diagnosed Celiac
8/14/06 Diagnosed Addison's Disease also known as Adrenal Insufficiency

#9 givingthanx

 
givingthanx

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 42 posts
 

Posted 26 February 2007 - 03:41 PM

Hi - I have a linea nigra, that brown line that extends down from your belly button when you get pregnant.

Only problem is, I'm not pregnant (no chance whatsoever) and have never been pregnant. I read that this is a form of hyperpigmentation. I know that Addison's causes hyperpigmentation.

Anyone ever heard of Addison's causing linea nigra in particular?

This is so peculiar. It makes me feel real down. There's a lot of stuff I've had that I've never thought anything about until I got sick and started researching terms I didn't understand. All the cross referencing has keyed me into stuff I always just took for granted.

I also have - don't know if I'm saying this right - orthostatic something or other. Sometimes I get dizzy when I stand. It has caused some scary incidents in the shower in particular - I wobbled back and forth and then fell like a rigid ton of bricks. I was fortunate I didn't hit my head on the way down. Also, I seem to have low blood volume - when I give blood, it just barely trickles or spurts out, and they tell me I'm dehydrated. And sometimes my heart races. Is any of that normal?

Can those things be related to Addison's? What's going on?
  • 0

#10 WakeupNurse

 
WakeupNurse

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 11 posts
 

Posted 01 March 2007 - 10:14 AM

I too have been wondering if I am also suffering from Addison's disease. I go back to my doctor tomorrow and am going to ask him to check my cortisol levels. My health severely diminished about 2 months ago and have had to go on medical leave due to D, weight loss, nausea, loss of appetite, dehydration etc. We immediately suspected Celiac because I had always had some GI issues as well as autoimmune issues. I have gone gluten and casein free even though my blood tests were negative. My other health problems and fibromyalgia-like symptoms seem to be improving but these new severe symptoms are not and no one seems to know what is going on. I don't in particular have hyperpigmentation either but I seem to have all of the other symptoms. I'll let you know how it goes, I'd be curious to know if you find out anything else.
  • 0

#11 Fiddle-Faddle

 
Fiddle-Faddle

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,159 posts
 

Posted 01 March 2007 - 10:42 AM

I also have - don't know if I'm saying this right - orthostatic something or other. Sometimes I get dizzy when I stand.


Would this be orthostatic postural hypotension? That means that your blood pressure goes DOWN when you stand up, and not enough blood gets to your head (at least, that's how it was explained to me).

Could it also be somehow related to thyroid?
  • 0

#12 givingthanx

 
givingthanx

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 42 posts
 

Posted 01 March 2007 - 09:36 PM

Would this be orthostatic postural hypotension? That means that your blood pressure goes DOWN when you stand up, and not enough blood gets to your head (at least, that's how it was explained to me).

Could it also be somehow related to thyroid?



Yeah, it's orthostatic hypotension. After reading your question as to whether or not it could be related to thyroid, I did an Internet search and found that it can.

Check out this web page:
http://www.nhlbi.nih...hyp_causes.html

I just wonder about my linea nigra - that brown line on my belly pregnant women are supposed to get - and I'm not pregnant. Makes me wonder. Hmmm.
  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: