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Dyslexia?


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#1 Sinenox

 
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Posted 05 January 2007 - 06:25 PM

In the last year before I went on a gluten-free diet things got pretty bad. My head got so fuzzy that I couldn't concentrate, even if I wanted to and was trying. My cramping got worse. But stranger still, I began to get some kind of dyslexia. It wouldn't matter how many times a person confirmed with me that the room number I was looking for was 241, whether I'd seen the number, held it in my head and repeated it again and again for minutes. By the time I got to the floor I'd be looking for 421, or 124, or 120. So I was wondering, has anyone else experienced this? One of my relatives has diagnosed dyslexia but I'm not sure whether anyone has ever connected it to gluten, or if such a connection can be made. All I know is that I'd find myself having to look up phone numbers multiple times when I started to feel bad. Another part of my secret shame.
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Hereditary Celiac Disease
(misdiagnosed: thyroid, fibro., anemia, lupus, GERD, lactose intol.)
Possible additional sensitivity to soy, legumes.

All these strange symptoms are starting to make sense.
So happy to have found you all.

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#2 luvkin

 
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Posted 06 January 2007 - 09:14 AM

I am dyslexic and I can tell you this is not dyslexia. You would not be forgetting numbers you would be getting them out of sequence. So if your room was 369, you may remember it as 396. Spelling would not be great. Dyslexics depend on memory.
Erin Brockovich has dyslexia she depended on her memory so she would not have to depend on writing about all those cases. She would have to write it down eventually but she would not have been able to write it down while she was speaking to the people.
Most dyslexics have better spatial orientation. If you look up info on dyslexia you might be surprised to find out the many famous scientist, actors, inventors, and politicians that were and are dyslexic. Dyslexia is not brain damage.
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#3 luvkin

 
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Posted 06 January 2007 - 09:44 AM

Here are some quotes form famous dyslexics and dealing with thier dyslexia. I wonder where this world would be without them? (More quotes http://www.dys-add.c...ss.html#famous)


I was, on the whole, considerably discouraged by my school days. It was not pleasant to feel oneself so completely outclassed and left behind at the beginning of the race.
--Winston Churchill

He told me that his teachers reported that . . . he was mentally slow, unsociable, and adrift forever in his foolish dreams.
--Hans Albert Einstein, on his father, Albert Einstein

I, myself, was always recognized . . . as the "slow one" in the family. It was quite true, and I knew it and accepted it. Writing and spelling were always terribly difficult for me. My letters were without originality. I was . . . an extraordinarily bad speller and have remained so until this day.
--Agatha Christie

My teachers say I'm addled . . . my father thought I was stupid, and I almost decided I must be a dunce.
--Thomas Edison

You should prefer a good scientist without literary abilities than a literate one without scientific skills.
--Leonardo da Vinci

I just barely got through school. The problem was a learning disability, at a time when there was nowhere to get help.
--Bruce Jenner, Olympic gold medalist

Young George . . . although he was bright and intelligent and bursting with energy, he was unable to read and write. Patton's wife corrected his spelling, his punctuation, and his grammar.
--Biographer Martin Blumenson on General George Patton
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#4 Sinenox

 
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Posted 07 January 2007 - 03:23 PM

What you describe with the numbers is exactly what was happening to me. Occasionally a number would drop out but not usually. I only bring it up because I've asked a number of local Celiacs and some mentioned that they get the same problems occasionally. I'm certainly not maligning dyslexic people. As I mentioned a few of them are my relatives. :huh:
  • 0
Hereditary Celiac Disease
(misdiagnosed: thyroid, fibro., anemia, lupus, GERD, lactose intol.)
Possible additional sensitivity to soy, legumes.

All these strange symptoms are starting to make sense.
So happy to have found you all.

#5 Judyin Philly

 
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Posted 07 January 2007 - 05:59 PM

woops posted it twice..sorry
judy
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Judy in Southern CA

#6 Judyin Philly

 
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Posted 07 January 2007 - 06:01 PM

hi
I'm dyslexic and my son as well. If you have relatives with the dx, it's a possibility as it is hereditary. Brain fog from Fibro & celiac is bad enough but then throw in dyslexia and we have a full plate for sure.
hang in there ;)
Judy
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Judy in Southern CA

#7 cybermommy

 
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Posted 09 March 2007 - 10:26 AM

One of my relatives has diagnosed dyslexia but I'm not sure whether anyone has ever connected it to gluten, or if such a connection can be made. All I know is that I'd find myself having to look up phone numbers multiple times when I started to feel bad. Another part of my secret shame.


Hmmm... :rolleyes: I have never considered this possibility before. Gluten intolerance/allergy runs on my fathers side of the family, as does dyslexia. I have both celiac disease & a language processing disorder (dyslexia + the auditory equivalent). I have a genius IQ but have a low digit span (ability to remember numbers). I have increased this by useing my hands to hold some of the digits (I know sign language so can hold larger numbers on hands). I always sequence dominant hand first then non-dominant. This helps keep them in order. I have noticed I don't have nearly as much trouble since going gluten-free. In addition I have been able to come off all my seizure medicine, for idiopathic epilepsy, & have had no seizures. I had been diagnosed /w alzeimers because of my memory problems, but now w/o meds, my mental clarity/memory is pretty much back to normal.

Realize that many celiacs are deficient in B vitamins, which are necessary to brain function. You may wish to have some testing done to see what deficiencies you have or at least get a good gluten-free supplement. Don't give up, there is hope. :)

Wishing you the best,
Deb
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Deb

Misdiagnosed:
1979 w/ IBS (atypical) & idiopathic epilepsy
1980's acid reflux, chronic appendicitis
1991 chronic severe pain (thought to be related to injuries & compensation for injuries)
1995 gallbladder surgery
2003 exzema (not responsive to treatment)
2006 pain put me into electric wheelchair
Recurrent depression & anxiety (1975-2006)

Diagnosed w/ Celiac Disease Feb. 2007

I am currently off of all seizure & pain meds & doing GREAT! I am walking w/o even a cane. Sleeping in regular bed now w/ lots of pillows, but back on reflux meds.

Low Gluten since June 2006 (by accident) gluten-free since Feb. 2007
Other problem foods: Shellfish/iodine, dark green leafy vegtables, ie: spinach, tunip (greens as well as the root) I can cheat a little w/ spinach if it is raw. I love it in salads. Caffeine is also problem(fibroid cystic disease) & Nutrasweet causes me to have seizures.

Mother of 3. One w/ celiac disease & lactose intollerant, one non-sympomatic (allergic to blueberries, red #3 & red #33) & one thanking God he is adopted (though he is diabetic). I also care for toddler who is allergic to gluten, peanuts & soy. She is also lactose intolerant.

#8 Mtndog

 
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Posted 09 March 2007 - 11:49 AM

It IS possible that you have dyslexia but I taught students with dyslexia for two years and one of the most common misconceptions is that it's all about reversing numbers and letters, but it's much more complex than that (well- it can be).

The same thing (with numbers) started happening to me and I'm pretty sure it's brain fog. But if it's bothering you, it's definitely worth being evaluated.
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***************************
Beverly

Gluten free since 2005

In the midst of winter, I found there was within me an invincible summer.
Albert Careb


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#9 missy'smom

 
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Posted 09 March 2007 - 02:27 PM

I have been able to come off all my seizure medicine, for idiopathic epilepsy, & have had no seizures.


How long did it take before you could do this?
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Me: GLUTEN-FREE 7/06, multiple food allergies, T2 DIABETES DX 8/08, LADA-Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults, Who knew food allergies could trigger an autoimmune attack on the pancreas?! 1/11 Re-DX T1 DM, pos. DQ2 Celiac gene test 9/11
Son: ADHD '06,
neg. CELIAC PANEL 5/07
ALLERGY: "positive" blood and skin tests to wheat, which triggers his eczema '08
ENTEROLAB testing: elevated Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA Dec. '08
Gluten-free-Feb. '09
other food allergies

#10 Cam's Mom

 
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Posted 09 March 2007 - 04:25 PM

Hi!
I posted a while back about a similar issue with my daughter. She is in first grade now and starting to learn to read. Last year before she got very sick with Celiac (prior to diagnosis) she was starting all the early reading at a relatively "normal" rate. She was a very early talker and has above average communication skills. She is pretty good with fine motor skills and is very good at drawing and art.

Well, all of a sudden, she got very ill with undiagnosed celiac disease and by the time we got her diagnosed and on the diet we started to notice that she could no longer do things that she was able to do 6 months earlier. She could no longer identify the front of a book vs. the back of a book. She could not tell the difference between on vs. no or was vs. saw in writing. She was also asking us questions like: "what's the difference between push and pull". All of this seemed so odd to us - we kind of figured that it had to do with the trauma she'd been through (also diagnosed with tyoe 1 diabetes). Then at her 7 month check we found that her tTg was stll VERY high - - and her ability to learn was still pretty no existent. Then suddenly last month the kid's brain just came back to life. She is do incredibly vibrant and is ingesting books, no longer writing everything upside down and backward and is understanding difficult spacial concepts like chess.

I know that this is gluten related and her teacher who was tremendously skeptical a few months ago when I said that is what I suspected even called last week to tell us that he is totally amazed and now agrees that gluten could very well have been the culprit.

So, I think from what you are describing and what I have seen in her that there is a very strong relation!

I hope it straightens out for you soon.

Barb
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Daughter, Camryn diagnosed with diabetes 3/06
diagnosed with celiac (blood test and biosy confirmed) 5/06

#11 Mtndog

 
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Posted 09 March 2007 - 05:00 PM

Hmmm... :rolleyes: I have never considered this possibility before. Gluten intolerance/allergy runs on my fathers side of the family, as does dyslexia. I have both celiac disease & a language processing disorder (dyslexia + the auditory equivalent). I have a genius IQ but have a low digit span (ability to remember numbers). I have increased this by useing my hands to hold some of the digits (I know sign language so can hold larger numbers on hands). I always sequence dominant hand first then non-dominant. This helps keep them in order. I have noticed I don't have nearly as much trouble since going gluten-free. In addition I have been able to come off all my seizure medicine, for idiopathic epilepsy, & have had no seizures. I had been diagnosed /w alzeimers because of my memory problems, but now w/o meds, my mental clarity/memory is pretty much back to normal.

Realize that many celiacs are deficient in B vitamins, which are necessary to brain function. You may wish to have some testing done to see what deficiencies you have or at least get a good gluten-free supplement. Don't give up, there is hope. :)

Wishing you the best,
Deb


Wow Deb- that's AWESOME!!!!!!!!!!!!! I think there is still so much that we and doctors don't know about the neuro effects of celiac.

Barb- that's so great about your daughter too! See- it really does make a difference!
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***************************
Beverly

Gluten free since 2005

In the midst of winter, I found there was within me an invincible summer.
Albert Careb


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#12 finally diagnosed

 
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Posted 09 March 2007 - 06:29 PM

Hi!
I posted a while back about a similar issue with my daughter. She is in first grade now and starting to learn to read. Last year before she got very sick with Celiac (prior to diagnosis) she was starting all the early reading at a relatively "normal" rate. She was a very early talker and has above average communication skills. She is pretty good with fine motor skills and is very good at drawing and art.

Well, all of a sudden, she got very ill with undiagnosed celiac disease and by the time we got her diagnosed and on the diet we started to notice that she could no longer do things that she was able to do 6 months earlier. She could no longer identify the front of a book vs. the back of a book. She could not tell the difference between on vs. no or was vs. saw in writing. She was also asking us questions like: "what's the difference between push and pull". All of this seemed so odd to us - we kind of figured that it had to do with the trauma she'd been through (also diagnosed with tyoe 1 diabetes). Then at her 7 month check we found that her tTg was stll VERY high - - and her ability to learn was still pretty no existent. Then suddenly last month the kid's brain just came back to life. She is do incredibly vibrant and is ingesting books, no longer writing everything upside down and backward and is understanding difficult spacial concepts like chess.

I know that this is gluten related and her teacher who was tremendously skeptical a few months ago when I said that is what I suspected even called last week to tell us that he is totally amazed and now agrees that gluten could very well have been the culprit.

So, I think from what you are describing and what I have seen in her that there is a very strong relation!

I hope it straightens out for you soon.

Barb


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#13 finally diagnosed

 
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Posted 09 March 2007 - 06:37 PM

Hi!
I posted a while back about a similar issue with my daughter. She is in first grade now and starting to learn to read. Last year before she got very sick with Celiac (prior to diagnosis) she was starting all the early reading at a relatively "normal" rate. She was a very early talker and has above average communication skills. She is pretty good with fine motor skills and is very good at drawing and art.

Well, all of a sudden, she got very ill with undiagnosed celiac disease and by the time we got her diagnosed and on the diet we started to notice that she could no longer do things that she was able to do 6 months earlier. She could no longer identify the front of a book vs. the back of a book. She could not tell the difference between on vs. no or was vs. saw in writing. She was also asking us questions like: "what's the difference between push and pull". All of this seemed so odd to us - we kind of figured that it had to do with the trauma she'd been through (also diagnosed with tyoe 1 diabetes). Then at her 7 month check we found that her tTg was stll VERY high - - and her ability to learn was still pretty no existent. Then suddenly last month the kid's brain just came back to life. She is do incredibly vibrant and is ingesting books, no longer writing everything upside down and backward and is understanding difficult spacial concepts like chess.

I know that this is gluten related and her teacher who was tremendously skeptical a few months ago when I said that is what I suspected even called last week to tell us that he is totally amazed and now agrees that gluten could very well have been the culprit.

So, I think from what you are describing and what I have seen in her that there is a very strong relation!

I hope it straightens out for you soon.

Barb

Hi, still new to this board hope I post this right. I have been diagnosed since 1wk before xmas. My daughter is showing similar symptoms now of confusing her words, reading the word of as fo and was as saw. Things she new before are all a task to her at school, she is also in first grade. She has always had stomach problems and now that I have been confirmed with celiac my children are being tested. She is going tomorrow morning to have her blood panel drawn. My oldest is in college with all the stomach problems, he is in denial. He won't be tested until he comes homes from school. I do believe that celiac plays a part with your neuro psyche I was getting very confused for a while there and they blamed in on my hypoglycemia. Have been off gluten since last week in dec, no more allergy meds and can finally think straight and remember peoples names. I am hoping she doesn't have it. It is a very hard way of life to adjust, but if she does it is better to catch it now than to go through what we have been through. Thanks for listening. L
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#14 Cam's Mom

 
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Posted 09 March 2007 - 06:50 PM

I know what you mean about hoping that your kids don't have it . . . but the good news is that little kids are so much more resiliant than we stubborn old people. My daughter is so amazing how she deals with things. She doesn't feel sorry for herself and readily eats all of my experimental baking and says it is delicious. Today she said "don't worry mommy these bagels taste fine to me, I don't even remember what a real one tastes like".

And, really we have been able to make all of her favorite foods gluten free so that she is not missing out on anything. She gets it that the going to parties and social stuff should be about the people and not the food - a concept I will never truly understand. She is going to be healthier and stronger for it. As my mother says, it's an unfortunate way to build really good character.

As for the brain fog, it is interesting that most adults (at least on this site) seem to note at least some brain fog as a symptom yet getting people (mostly at school) to accept that a child would have that same symptom is difficult. My daughter said she actually felt like she had gluten (or peanut butter) in her head - yuck!

I wish the best for you and your family.
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Daughter, Camryn diagnosed with diabetes 3/06
diagnosed with celiac (blood test and biosy confirmed) 5/06

#15 finally diagnosed

 
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Posted 09 March 2007 - 07:01 PM

I know what you mean about hoping that your kids don't have it . . . but the good news is that little kids are so much more resiliant than we stubborn old people. My daughter is so amazing how she deals with things. She doesn't feel sorry for herself and readily eats all of my experimental baking and says it is delicious. Today she said "don't worry mommy these bagels taste fine to me, I don't even remember what a real one tastes like".

And, really we have been able to make all of her favorite foods gluten free so that she is not missing out on anything. She gets it that the going to parties and social stuff should be about the people and not the food - a concept I will never truly understand. She is going to be healthier and stronger for it. As my mother says, it's an unfortunate way to build really good character.

As for the brain fog, it is interesting that most adults (at least on this site) seem to note at least some brain fog as a symptom yet getting people (mostly at school) to accept that a child would have that same symptom is difficult. My daughter said she actually felt like she had gluten (or peanut butter) in her head - yuck!

I wish the best for you and your family.


thank you, my daughter too is very happy eating my gluten free food and my baked goods. she loves the fact that i have to make everything now.
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