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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

2 Yr Old Has Gene But Blood Test Negative
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6 posts in this topic

Well I am a bit pissed off and upset. I called the Dr today for the genetic test results, and finally got a message back, yes your daughter did come back positive for one of the two genes for celiac, but since her blood antibody test are negative, that means that she doesn't have it, but has a very slight chance that she could develop celiac later in life.

What? The whole reason that she was tested was because she presented as a "textbook case" as the doctor put it, for celiac disease. Unfortunately she was gluten free for 9 months and not on gluten for a significant length of time (a few weeks) before the antibody tests were done (because I thought and the doctor thought that she would get really sick)

Her one test (I think it was the IGA) came back borderline low so that could be why her TTG looked normal. The last time my husband talked to the doctor she said if the genetic test came back positive she would want to do an endoscopy, and now they say she's fine. I am going to get really pushy with the doctor in a minute when I get someone on the phone.

I really want to get a diagnosis for her.

Arrgh!

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A recent study on the celiac.com main page showed that, unless there has been a decent amount of intestinal damage, the blood tests often are not nearly as reliable as theoretical numbers stated in the literature. You might check it out. If she'd been gluten-free for 9 months, much of the damage may have healed, and she didn't have enough additional damage for the blood tests to come back. But really, the fact that she responded to the diet is a test itself.

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But really, the fact that she responded to the diet is a test itself.

I agree, it is is compelling, but I keep insisting on a diagnosis maybe because I get tired of the perception that this is some kind of food neurosis that I am imposing on her, and I know it doesn't matter what people think, but I really want to be able to explain it with conviction and a diagnosis, maybe that can't happen but I can try.

Well as if I didn't find all of this testing to be discouraging enough! I really feel like I have to be such an advocate for my daughter to get answers because it would be easy for doctors to write it off when she comes back normal on the antibody tests.

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The antibody test results can end up false-negative if one is gluten-free for a time before taking the tests, this goes for a biopsy as well. One must eat gluten daily until all testing for celiac disaese is completed, normally one should do this for at least 6 weeks beforehand.

Take care,

Scott

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I have a nine-year-old brother who also has the gene, but is negative to celiac. We did bloodwork with two different labs, with one test with one lab, two with the other or something.....so there was no chance of a lab screw up. Anyway, he, too, will probably develop celiac disease later in life.........I don't think that will be a big deal for him, though, cause he tries my gluten-free food and he likes a lot of it.

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Scott, that goes along with what I was thinking, that it was too soon, I guess I just went along with the doctor hoping we wouldn't have to keep her on gluten for that long. The only part that bothers me is how dismissive the doctor's assistant was, and she was apparently saying what the doctor told her. I am not satisfied that the tests are telling the whole story.

celiac3270, it's good that your brother knows he has the gene. In my daughters case, she was very symptomatic so I don't yet believe the negative test result.

Does anyone have an estimate on how many people carry the genetic marker for celiac disease and the likelyhood of developing Celiac if you have the gene marker?

I have had someone say to me, it's a genetic disease, if you have the gene you shouldn't consume gluten, I'm not sure if I agree with that, but I'm curious how common it is.

Thanks for the replies

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