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Which gluten-free Moisturizers Do You Use On Your Face?
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I'm just wondering which gluten-free moisturizers everyone uses on their face. The skin on my face is way too dry. I live in Northern Alberta where the temperature can get below -30!

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I use Dove moisturiser with spf. I am in Colorado and it is really dry here as well. I would say it does a fair job, not great. But I know it is safe. I sometimes will put it on twice before putting on make-up.

Hez

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Thanks... Dove is safe, good to know. I'll look for Dove moisturizer when I go shopping.

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My skin has been flaking in these dry and cold temperatures. George's Special Dry Hand Cream is good at night especially for hands and feet. But it's a little too thick for the face.

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Carrie,

Go to Essential Day Spa dot com ( In Van, I think)...they have everything under the sun, but I liked the Decleor line Climatique when I lived in Wyoming...meant for sub zero temps and all botanical based...

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Most regular moisturizers seem to irritate my skin (it's pretty sensitive). I use straight Jojoba oil on my skin... it's non-comedegenic, and works really well for dry skin.

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Though I don't need a skin moisturizer, I do know that coconut oil makes about the best moisturizer I've ever come across. You can put it to the test without buying a whole jar though. CoconutOil-Online offers a sample that would certainly last plenty long enough to see how well it does. It only takes a drop or two. Not only does it moisturize, but it actually nourishes the skin and aids in healing, etc. It's the finest grade I'm aware of (meant for cooking and baking), but I suppose for the skin you could use one of the cheaper brands after the sample is used up. Many people report healthier skin just having the oil in their diet.

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Most regular moisturizers seem to irritate my skin (it's pretty sensitive). I use straight Jojoba oil on my skin... it's non-comedegenic, and works really well for dry skin.

I also use straight Jojoba at night....skin is much softer the next day. but, I am using a retinol cream also, so at times my face is like an alligator, adn I MUST use a strong sunscreen every day. I LOVE Neutrogena Ultra Sheer dry-touch sunblock, I had researched it before buying, and it turns out it is the same one my new dermatologist recommends also.

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Thanks everyone for your suggesstions. I really appreciate it. I'm going shopping tonight too see what I can find.

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I bought a Dove product, not sure if it is meant for the face, but it seems to work! Thanks for your suggestions.

I have another question... What brand of lip gloss do you use because mine obviously doesn't work very well. I find that my lips are almost always peeling and/or dry. My lip gloss leaves chunks of gloss all over my lips and I think it's mixed in with peeling skin. I'm sure it looks wonderful.

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lips - burts bees (peppermint is my preference :) )

face - alba theraputics green tea and aloe

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lips - burts bees (peppermint is my preference )

face - alba theraputics green tea and aloe

Thanks Tiffany! I'll look for those products. Can you find them in pharmacies or do you have to go to elsewhere.
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Thanks Tiffany! I'll look for those products. Can you find them in pharmacies or do you have to go to elsewhere.

depends on the pharmacy, it seems. I thought I had to get them at whole foods until I moved to seattle, and found that the bartell's across the street carried them. :o

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depends on the pharmacy, it seems. I thought I had to get them at whole foods until I moved to seattle, and found that the bartell's across the street carried them.
Thanks! Hopefully I will find some. My lips especially need help!
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Badger Balm is another great product for lips

www.badgerbalm.com

I find coconut oil is great as a moisterizer (and lip balm) as well.

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Do you have to buy Badger Balm online? Or can you find it in stores?

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Do you have to buy Badger Balm online? Or can you find it in stores?

I find it at health food stores. I even found it in Australia...so I think they sell it all over the place :)

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Hopefully I will find some of these lip balms. I'll see if I can find them at a health food store I know about the next time I'm in the city. Thanks for all your help.

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a good tip with the lip moisturizer is to use it before you need it - use it consistently for best results kind of thing. :)

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a good tip with the lip moisturizer is to use it before you need it - use it consistently for best results kind of thing.
Thanks, I'll try that out. I probably don't apply enough.
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Hi Carrie,

My favorite is Badger Balm. It comes in either a pot or a stick. Flavored or unflavored.

I get mine at Wegman's grocery store, but have also seen it at Whole Foods.

I called them a while back, and was told that they don't use gluten at all in their facility. The woman said that they had had so many inquiries about this that they checked with the chemist, and verified this.

They also have a body butter that I love. :)

Try using balm every night before bed--also you can apply Vaseline to your lips, and rub gently with a toothbrush--to exfoliate the dry skin on your lips. Do this very gently. Don't do it if you are prone to cold sores.

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Hi Carrie,

My favorite is Badger Balm. It comes in either a pot or a stick. Flavored or unflavored.

I get mine at Wegman's grocery store, but have also seen it at Whole Foods.

I called them a while back, and was told that they don't use gluten at all in their facility. The woman said that they had had so many inquiries about this that they checked with the chemist, and verified this.

They also have a body butter that I love.

Try using balm every night before bed--also you can apply Vaseline to your lips, and rub gently with a toothbrush--to exfoliate the dry skin on your lips. Do this very gently. Don't do it if you are prone to cold sores.

Thanks!

I'm glad it comes in a stick and that the chemists have verified that it is gluten-free! I may try Vaseline.

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Origins has a moisturing mask called Drink Up. I leave it on for about 15 minutes and it is usually almost all absorbed. I use that frequently when my skin gets dry and it really helps. I use dove sensitive night cream during the day and at night because it is thicker than normal lotions.

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Karite lip balm is excellent. My son's teenaged friend came over and was using chapstick (alcohol!) and had horrible chapped lips. I gave him a karite lip balm and by the next day, he had no signs of chapped lips. I found his chapstick in my trash!

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Origins has a moisturing mask called Drink Up. I leave it on for about 15 minutes and it is usually almost all absorbed. I use that frequently when my skin gets dry and it really helps. I use dove sensitive night cream during the day and at night because it is thicker than normal lotions.
I may also try the Dove night cream. I really like the Dove product I bought last week.

Karite lip balm is excellent. My son's teenaged friend came over and was using chapstick (alcohol!) and had horrible chapped lips. I gave him a karite lip balm and by the next day, he had no signs of chapped lips. I found his chapstick in my trash!
Chapstick is what I'm using! Ah! Maybe that's why my lips are always dry! I will also look for Karite. Hopefully I'll find one of the mentioned lip balms.
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