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CD Sufferers And Eating Disorders


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Poll: As a celiac have you ever had; (41 member(s) have cast votes)

As a celiac have you ever had;

  1. Anorexia (7 votes [17.07%])

    Percentage of vote: 17.07%

  2. Bulemia (2 votes [4.88%])

    Percentage of vote: 4.88%

  3. Anorexia and Bulemia (6 votes [14.63%])

    Percentage of vote: 14.63%

  4. Compulsive eating (8 votes [19.51%])

    Percentage of vote: 19.51%

  5. Pica (eating non-edible substances) (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  6. None, normal eating (gi distress not a consideration here) (18 votes [43.90%])

    Percentage of vote: 43.90%

Vote Guests cannot vote

18 replies to this topic

#1 Mballerina

 
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Posted 06 September 2004 - 08:09 PM

Sorry for another poll. I really appreciate the answers to such a sensitive issue. There has been some links between celiac disease and the correlation of eating disorders, however, this has been far under researched and that needs to be rectified.

Thank you for you answers and feel free to share you personal experience or opinion as this will help to bring to light extraneous factors that need to be considered.
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Magdalena (1st celiac disease, than the world)

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#2 Alexolua

 
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Posted 06 September 2004 - 09:39 PM

I haven't had any, but can definitely see how Celiac disease could lead to one. Though I don't have any other useful info. =)
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#3 burdee

 
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Posted 06 September 2004 - 10:04 PM

I'll be interested in seeing results of this poll. Before I learned I had celiac disease, I created a website for people who have struggled with 'disordered eating' (ED habits which I don't consider a 'disease') and are now committed to recovery. So I moderate that website for almost 40 members.

Since I've corresponded with other celiacs and posted here, I can see how reactions to celiac symptoms can be considered 'eating disorder' habits. For example, I and others have delayed eating as long as possible, even when we were very hungry, to avoid painful or uncomfortable symptoms. That could be considered anorexia. (My celiac disease symptoms were excruciating abdominal pain as well as bloating, gas and constipation.) I and others have thrown up after ingesting foods which gave up symptoms. When I eliminated dairy (to which I also have autoimmune/antibody reactions) I no longer had 'instant reflux' (foods just came up after meals) after consuming dairy. That throwing up after meals could be considered 'bulimic' purging. Furthermore, many celiacs have felt addicted to the very foods to which they were intolerant and many 'binged' on those foods when they learned they had to abstain in a kind of 'last supper' mindset. That could be considered bulimic 'bingeing'. Research on opiate peptides from gluten 'digests' suggests that people who don't tolerate gluten can leak those undigested gluten peptide molecules from their gut into their bloodstream. Those gluten 'digests' can then stimulate the opiate receptors of the brain, just like morphine. That can make consuming gluten seem very addictive, one of the therapeutic 'hallmarks' of eating disorders.

Mballerina: What motivated you to create this poll? What is your experience with 'disordered eating' habits?
BURDEE
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Gluten, dairy, soy, egg, cane sugar, vanilla and nutmeg free. Enterolab diagnosed gluten/casein intolerant 7/04; soy intolerant 8/07. ELISA test diagnosed egg/cane sugar IgG allergies 8/06; vanilla/nutmeg 8/06. 2006-10 diagnosed by DNA Microbial stool tests and successfully treated: Klebsiella, Enterobacter Cloaecae, Cryptosporidia, Candida, C-diff, Achromobacter, H. Pylori and Dientamoeba Fragilis. 6/10 Heidelberg capsule test diagnosed hypochloridia. Vitamin D deficiency, hypothyroiditis, hypochloridia and low white blood cells caused vulnerability to infections. I now take Betaine HCl, probiotics, Vitamin D and T3 thyroid supplement to maintain immunity.


#4 celiac3270

 
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Posted 07 September 2004 - 03:15 AM

I don't have and never had any.......but celiacs often develop aversions to food not because of weight, but because of what food has done to them and how celiac disease and gluten-containing food have given them both physiological and psychological.....symptoms.....depression, abdominal pain, diarrhea......I think that could turn anyone away from food.......I've never been a food person, but I just eat because it's something that has to be done to stay healthy.....
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#5 Racheleona

 
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Posted 07 September 2004 - 07:35 AM

Hello, I have had anorexic like behavior in my life, but not as a result of stomach pains ( I don't get stomach pains), but as far as being told to gain weight, and thinking I'm okay with gaining weight, but once I do, I restrict my eating to get my weight back down b'c I don't like gaining 5 pounds or whatever. I also weigh myself EVERY day. :( I know a little compulsive eh? I was a ballet dancer though, and still have that mind set to stay thin.

Rachel
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#6 strack2004

 
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Posted 07 September 2004 - 09:33 AM

Speaking of compulsive weighing, I still weigh myself morning and evening. Ruth
Strack2004, There's another Ruth around.
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#7 celiac3270

 
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Posted 07 September 2004 - 10:25 AM

I used to weigh myself daily -- when I started eating gluten-free -- but that was cause I was desparate to see improvement, even if just two tenths of a pound gained on the digital scale......I haven't weighed myself in weeks and have no desire to see that I've remained the same or lost half a pound.
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#8 dbrose

 
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Posted 11 September 2004 - 12:00 PM

Ive suffered from eating disorder for some years now. As a kid I compulsivly ate, and my mum wondered at times if I had Coeliacs. Then as a teen I dropped wieght, clinical anorexia nervosa. It was after a time of severe starvation, when I started eating again, that I started to have really bad problems with gluten. It feels almost like my eating disorder lead to my digestive problems.
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#9 Alexolua

 
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Posted 11 September 2004 - 02:20 PM

It feels almost like my eating disorder lead to my digestive problems.

Well, might have. Read on here, some people with the genes for Celiac Disease, or a gluten intolerance, may never have problems in their life. Sometimes something needs to trigger it.. and maybe your eating disorder did that.

If I understand it correctly. So, the eating disorder didn't cause it.. but might have triggered it.
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#10 burdee

 
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Posted 11 September 2004 - 05:49 PM

Actually I would say it's the other way around ... undiagnosed celiac disease symptoms often lead to 'disordered eating' behaviors. I've heard from many celiacs who avoid eating for long periods to avoid the inevitable uncomfortable (and even painful) symptoms. That could be considered 'anorexic' starving by people who don't understand celiac disease. Also many celiacs vomit after meals in which they have consumed gluten containing foods or anytime their symptoms are nauseating or painful. That could be considered 'bulimic' purging. According to 'gluten digests as opiate peptides' studies, people who don't tolerate gluten (or casein) are compulsively attracted to eat the very substances which harm their bodies. That attraction may be considered 'eating addiction' by people who don't understand celiac disease. I personally have used all those 'disordered eating' behaviors in attempt to cope with undiagnosed celiac symptoms. My 'starving' and 'purging' were not related to any desire to lose weight, but those were ways I reacted to excruciatingly painful symptoms before I knew gluten/casein/soy ingestion caused my symptoms.

However, I have also met people whose doctors dismissed their celiac disease symptoms as results of their 'disordered eating' behaviors. Overeating can certainly cause indigestion, acid reflux and even bloating. But those symptoms should not continue when someone tries to eat moderately. Moreover, binge eating or even purging cannot make someone gluten intolerant. <_<
BURDEE
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Gluten, dairy, soy, egg, cane sugar, vanilla and nutmeg free. Enterolab diagnosed gluten/casein intolerant 7/04; soy intolerant 8/07. ELISA test diagnosed egg/cane sugar IgG allergies 8/06; vanilla/nutmeg 8/06. 2006-10 diagnosed by DNA Microbial stool tests and successfully treated: Klebsiella, Enterobacter Cloaecae, Cryptosporidia, Candida, C-diff, Achromobacter, H. Pylori and Dientamoeba Fragilis. 6/10 Heidelberg capsule test diagnosed hypochloridia. Vitamin D deficiency, hypothyroiditis, hypochloridia and low white blood cells caused vulnerability to infections. I now take Betaine HCl, probiotics, Vitamin D and T3 thyroid supplement to maintain immunity.


#11 Mballerina

 
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Posted 11 September 2004 - 06:19 PM

Burdee, I totally agree with you. I have read the research in many studies, some note even related to eating disorders, some even on autism and other such things and it paints the picture that you are presenting. There are some interesting things that happen in the brain with neurotransmitters. Unfortunatly a alot of these studies are in there infancy. I have also experienced this pattern and can say that for me these facts are true.

Thank you for your post, it is wonderful.
Magdalena, CDA
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Magdalena (1st celiac disease, than the world)

#12 Alexolua

 
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Posted 11 September 2004 - 10:40 PM

Actually I would say it's the other way around ... undiagnosed celiac disease symptoms often lead to 'disordered eating' behaviors.

Rereading the post I responded too, nix my response. The one by Burdee sounds more likely. =)
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#13 dbrose

 
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Posted 12 September 2004 - 06:37 AM

I have read the research in many studies, some note even related to eating disorders,

Do you have any more infrmation on that research? Links or who published it? I would be interested to read it if you do. Doctors Ive talked to havent known of any reaserch into this area, or any concrete links.

I dont think that you will be able to convince me that my eating disorder was purely a result of undiagnosed coeliacs. There are far too many other issues involved. It is interesting though, I can certainly see that my compulsive eating as a child could well be related to undiagnosed problems, especially as it was often bread, pasta, and wheat containing things that I would binge eat. 4

However there is a difference between anorexia (loss of appetite = due to physiological reasons) and Anorexia Nervosa ('Nervous' loss of appetite = due to psychological reasons). I never just lost my appetite, I worked insanely hard to lose wieght, and pushed my body through hell, not because of physical discomfort, but because of emotional reasons.

Reading through what people have written here, I see things like "adversion to food" and "anorexia like symptoms". That sounds like anorexia to me as in loss of appetite, possibly sub-clinical anorexia, rather than anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa which are psychological problems and dispite what anyone says thier cause and focus is not food.
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#14 Mballerina

 
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Posted 13 September 2004 - 05:25 PM

I agree that that anorexia nervosa has multifactorial causation as all psychological phenomena do. No one disputes the fact that there is not an emotional component and such. However, there is an interesting possibility between this emotional factor being further stressed by discomfort and pavlovian conditioning. For anyone to say that celiac disease could be the one cause of anorexia nervosa would be wrong, just as even now there is no concrete causation for this disease.
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Magdalena (1st celiac disease, than the world)

#15 burdee

 
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Posted 13 September 2004 - 05:59 PM

I wasn't trying to suggest all anorexic or bulimic behaviors are 'caused' by undiagnosed celiac symptoms. I moderate a website for people with 'disordered eating' behaviors which include bingeing, purging, starving, compulsive overeating and chronic yoyo dieting cycles. Only a few of over 40 members have described symptoms which could be celiac related. Certainly bulimic myths (such as using purging to compensate for overeating) and food rules (according to what the latest diet says will make you 'fat') influence people's choices to use those 'disordered' behaviors to cope with body image and weight problems. Others use those behaviors to distract themselves from other unpleasant situations or relationships in their lives. However diagnosed celiacs who have used 'disordered eating behaviors' might consider how their undiagnosed celiac symptoms influenced their choice to use eating behaviors rather than drugs, alcohol, nicotine or other addictive substances or activities, when they were stressed.
BURDEE
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Gluten, dairy, soy, egg, cane sugar, vanilla and nutmeg free. Enterolab diagnosed gluten/casein intolerant 7/04; soy intolerant 8/07. ELISA test diagnosed egg/cane sugar IgG allergies 8/06; vanilla/nutmeg 8/06. 2006-10 diagnosed by DNA Microbial stool tests and successfully treated: Klebsiella, Enterobacter Cloaecae, Cryptosporidia, Candida, C-diff, Achromobacter, H. Pylori and Dientamoeba Fragilis. 6/10 Heidelberg capsule test diagnosed hypochloridia. Vitamin D deficiency, hypothyroiditis, hypochloridia and low white blood cells caused vulnerability to infections. I now take Betaine HCl, probiotics, Vitamin D and T3 thyroid supplement to maintain immunity.





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