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Gluten And The Brain (more Info)
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6 posts in this topic

Another great Dr. Lewey blog entry!

This is good news for us Gluten-heads!

Snippet

Gluten associated SPECT brain imaging abnormalities in frontal area of brain reverse with gluten free diet

Though reports of functional brain scans or SPECT imaging in celiac disease are limited there are some very interesting findings. The most dramatic is the report in 1997 of a patient with established schizophrenia who was newly diagnosed with celiac disease as confirmed by a positive endomysial antibody blood test and villous atrophy on intestinal biopsy. Before starting a gluten-free diet he had an abnormal SPECT scan showing decreased blood flow to the frontal lobe of the brain. On a gluten-free diet his schizophrenia and celiac disease symptoms resolved and both the intestinal biopsy and brain scan normalized.

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Sure wish there was more hope being given for neurological/brain-damaged celiacs. At least this article is positive. Most articles indicate that healing is slow and damage sometimes irreversable. No real improvement for me in nearly a year. :blink:

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Aw, sorry to hear that. :( I've had such a huge improvement in my mood, cognition, memory... it is as if I found the brain I had 20 years ago restored to my noggin.

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I have had a similar experience - I feel as though my brain is back. Although, it is still a bit elusive at times (gluten-free less than 4 months), my brain is functioning much better than it had been for at least a few years. I'm hoping it will continue to improve. But I still have other wierd neurological effects - not sure when or if I can expect those to improve.

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I know it's hard, but try cutting corn out as well. . .my neuro issues settled down initially, and then spiked up again when I put corn back into my diet. I've been corn and soy free (as well as gluten-free) for four months now and the neuro symptoms are completely gone.

Also make sure that your workspace is gluten-free (clean your desk, telephon and mouse, and change your keyboard and don't let anyone use it!). . .I notice that whenever I change jobs, there is a period where I'm educating my coworkers where the neuro issues come back in milder form until my environment gets properly under control.

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I am glad to have my brain back too! :D

I was diagnosed /w idiopathic epilepsy at 21 or 22 years old, though by history I had evidence of seizures in childhood. (Diagnosed w/ IBS at same time & can't remember ever having normal GI function.) My mental functioning continued to decrease untill I was diagnosed w/ Alziemers in my 30's. I went low gluten in late June 2006 (continued to have some oat & trace gluten sources). I have been able to wean off of all seizure meds & am also taking no Alziemers meds. I have had no seizures & yes, my brain is functioning again. Yay! Oh, & my lifelong dyslexia seems to have virtually disapeared.

I was officially diagnosed w/ celiac disease 2 wks ago & have gone 100% gluten free. I am on disability w/ a list of 14 different ongoing diagnoses. Most of these are resolving on my gluten-free diet. I am appalled that it took 47 years for a proper diagnosis, but delighted to finally be getting well & getting my life back.

What is really sad is i was a highly trained RN (more training than many MD's) & I had never heard of celiac disease. It makes me wonder if my grandfather, who died of intestinal cancer, had celiac disease. Six of his grandchildren have celiac disease/gluten intolerance/allergy.

B) Good Luck & hang in there,

Deb

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