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Hi guys. It's freezing her in Wisconsin. -2 F can you believe that? I'm cracking!

Anyways, I need a good lotion and before I was diagnosed I always used the Eucerin products like Aquaphor, etc...

They aren't open yet to call and I haven't seen anything on their site in their FAQ's.

Do you guys know if their products are gluten-free?

(For instance, right now I"m only using Cetaphil gentle cleanser because that's the only one that's gluten-free...)

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Ads by Google:

Hi - I'm just posting this again to see if anyone answers...?

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I've been using "avon moisture theraphy Intensive hand cream" I emailed them and was told its safe. Its amazing stuff, my hands get so bad they would bleed, now they're so soft. I order on line, its in a white tube, blue lettering 4.2 oz.

my hubby has rosacea, nothing the dr gave him helped, he used this on his face and it all went away in 2 days!!

hope this helps :D

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FYI - I was told by Eucerin today that they can't guarantee any of their products are gluten-free (incl. aquaphor).

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I highly recommend Burt's Bees Hand Salve! I also use Vaselin Intensive Therapy. I have very dry skin.

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I've been using ST.Ives Extreme Relief Intensive Healing Advanced Therapy Lotion. (Unscented . Hypo-Allergenic) It is one of the few lotions that feels soothing to me. Early I had posted a reply that I had received from St. Ives that listed all their products that contain gluten and this WAS NOT on that list.

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I've been using ST.Ives Extreme Relief Intensive Healing Advanced Therapy Lotion. (Unscented . Hypo-Allergenic) It is one of the few lotions that feels soothing to me. Early I had posted a reply that I had received from St. Ives that listed all their products that contain gluten and this WAS NOT on that list.

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I use Udderly Smooth Udder Cream on my hands. It's gluten-free, it's thick, but isn't at all greasy. http://www.uddercream.com/

For my body, I use Amlactin, which used to only be available with a prescription. You can usually find it near the pharmacy, or you can ask for it. It is gluten-free as well as corn free :)

http://www.upsher-smith.com/products/amlac...amlactinfaq.htm

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"(For instance, right now I"m only using Cetaphil gentle cleanser because that's the only one that's gluten-free...)"

Is this really the ONLY gluten free cleanser?

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Why do we need to use gluten-fre body products? Gluten doesn't absorb through the skin does it? Is it just the risk of having it on your hands and therefore contaminating food? :huh:

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"(For instance, right now I"m only using Cetaphil gentle cleanser because that's the only one that's gluten-free...)"

Is this really the ONLY gluten free cleanser?

No, perhaps she meant that the cleanser is the only *Cetaphil* product that is gluten-free. There are many gluten-free facial cleansers out there.

I use Zia Moisturizing Cleanser. It can be found at health food stores, Whole Foods and Wegman's Natural Marketplace.

There are also many other widely available brands.

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I cook a lot, and wash my hands a lot, which doesn't help with dry skin. Rather than use hand lotion all the time, just to be quickly washed away, I keep a small container of a mixture of coconut oil and olive oil and use this generously while I'm in the kitchen. It's "food" so I feel I'm not contaminating my food with lotion ingredients (however safe) and is dirt cheap. It's nice on my lips, too.

When I'm not cooking, I use Savonnerie lotion www.gfsoap.com and Badger Balm (similar to Burt's Bee's balms). Both these products contain no gluten and no corn derivatives (which is usually in the vitamin E/C/A, etc.). Badger makes a lip balm, too, that's safe for those with corn allergies.

BadgerBalm

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Why do we need to use gluten-fre body products? Gluten doesn't absorb through the skin does it? Is it just the risk of having it on your hands and therefore contaminating food? :huh:

You're right about gluten not being absorbed through the skin. I use gluten-free lotion because I'm always putting it on may hands and sometimes I'll put my finger in my mouth to bite off a hang nail....

It's just an extra precaution.

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    • I just traveled three weeks this summer in Europe (Eastern).  Do not trust that the airlines will remember to load a gluten-free meal for you.  There is a 50-50 chance that they will not (in my experience).  We packed ONLY carry on.  Still found plenty of room to stash some emergency food.  You should be able to find food within an International airport.  Chips and typical junk food clearly labeled, even fruit.  Print or load Celiac travel cards with you in all the languages you will need.  They are free.  Google it.  Found these handy (not only in restaurants) but in the markets when we could not read labels but the staff could read them and Help us to make gluten-free choices.  amazing how you can communicate without knowing the language.  A few words like "thank you" in their language go along way (so does Google Translator).  Never met anyone who was not willing to help.   I carry a collapsible cooler that I pack with food and bags of ice to eat on then plane or right at my arrival or connection.  I take extra zip lock baggies with me.  Sometimes TSA will let you through if the ice is still hard (not melting).  Some will make you toss them then I just ask a restaurant to refill my ziplock baggies after passing Security.   I also carry a doctor's letter on my phone to show I am celiac, but no one has ever asked for me to present it.   Even though I carry a "third" piece of luggage on board, I have not been stopped.  Both that and my day backpack fit under the seat.  I use this cooler as needed through our trips.  If not, it fits in my backpack.  
    • Welcome, Kierra. You're only 15 so you need to make sure your parents are 100% aware of your medical issues so that they can advocate for you. It may or may not be celiac, but the only way to find out is to start with a full celiac blood panel, then an endoscope if necessary. However, for the tests to be accurate, you must consume gluten on a daily basis. 
    • Great points!  We use the "Find Me Gluten Free" app a lot (post too).   We look for reviews created by celiacs.  I probably sounded like Debbie Downer when I posted above, but it is possible to go out and dine at restuarants, it just takes a little research and time to the restaurant staff.    
    • Yes it sounds like you may need further testing to rule out other conditions. Maybe seeking a second opinion from a endocrinologist and/ or rheumatologist would be a place to start.
    • This is a personal choice and everyone will have different levels of comfort depending on personal preferences and their circumstances -- what's available, where they live, the details of their condition. Gluten Dude is a blogger who has written a lot about the topic of dining out with Celiac: http://glutendude.com/category/eating-out/ Calling ahead to see if they are gluten-free, learning about their practices, and make sure their able to accommodate requests is a good strategy. There's other tricks like using the gluten-free filter on Yelp when searching for restaurants. I know some people like Find Me Gluten Free which has a website and app. It's an adjustment for sure, but it can be worth it to feel better and still get to do things you enjoy.
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