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Fritos
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19 posts in this topic

Does any celiac out there eat Fritos corn chips (in the USA) safely?

Thanks - A

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Ads by Google:

Fritos are gluten free in the US.

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I'm looking for chips too, but I noticed this at the bottom of that page and wanted to bring it to your attention ...

"Our LAY

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Fritos are gluten free in the US.

I'm pretty sure the Chili Cheese ones have gluten in them, but the regular do not.

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My family doesn't seem to be real sensitive to cc issues, but I do have problems with Fritos if I eat too many. I love those chips too.

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Hi,

Here is the direct link to your question regarding Frito chips. They list all the varieties you can eat on this page.

http://www.fritolay.com/fl/flstore/cgi-bin...odID_364066.htm

Safe eating!!

Marcia,

This is just a legal disclaimer. If I was their attorney, I would advise them to say the same thing. Technically, "gluten free" will not have an actual definition until 2008 (i believe). Even then, it will allow for 20 ppm of gluten and under to be gluten free.

It does not make economic sense for these companies to switch to gluten free dedicated lines (at least not yet). I don't blame them. In fact, I am glad they disclose how they make them so I can make an informed decision on whether to buy their product or not.

furthermore, if they use the same lines for different products (some gluten free and some not), they had better issue this disclaimer (for liability reasons).

Eating out and non-dedicated lines are part of the risks associated with being Celiac. It sucks, but that's business/life.

:)

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Marcia,

This is just a legal disclaimer. If I was their attorney, I would advise them to say the same thing. Technically, "gluten free" will not have an actual definition until 2008 (i believe). Even then, it will allow for 20 ppm of gluten and under to be gluten free.

It does not make economic sense for these companies to switch to gluten free dedicated lines (at least not yet). I don't blame them. In fact, I am glad they disclose how they make them so I can make an informed decision on whether to buy their product or not.

furthermore, if they use the same lines for different products (some gluten free and some not), they had better issue this disclaimer (for liability reasons).

Eating out and non-dedicated lines are part of the risks associated with being Celiac. It sucks, but that's business/life.

:)

See, I believe it does make economic sense for them to produce a gluten-free product on a dedicated line. I certainly don't want eat the first batch made on that line after they have made something with gluten ... :ph34r:

Anyone new to the diet may not respond to these, but later on probably will. We appear to get more sensitive to gluten the less we are exposed to it.

Until, I am certain I will not be glutenned and spend the next few days jerking and on the toilet, I'm not going to eat these ... They lost my $2.79 ... :lol:

Marcia

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I wish I could agree with ya.

But seeing how Frito Lay is a multi-billion dollar company and the gluten free market has not proven itslef to be sufficiently mainstream yet (at least mainstream enough for building new facilities to house dedicated lines), I don't see it happening.

What we think is a profitable market and what they think is a profitable market are two completely different things.

They will change when they have financial reports that tell them that the market will deliver the money to pay for a dedicated facility and for them to make the same amount (or more) of profits. Until that happens, they will not.

Much to our dismay...

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If it made economic sense to to it, they would be doing it! They want to make profits, not lose money. I used to work at Frito Lay Research, and at a plant. So I know some things associated with some products. But that was a long time ago, I'm sure there have been many changes since then.

I'm guessing that many of these products are gluten free to start with, but the seasonings may contain wheat or MSG or other chemicals some people may be sensitive to. The plain corn chips, potato chips and such are usually just corn & potatoes fried in oil with salt sprinked on. If you stick with those then theoretically you should be OK.

The first poster asked about Fritos corn chips. The plain one's don't have any gluten in them. Neither do plain Ruffles. Now when you start getting the seasoned one's you have to read the labels carefully.

If you looked at that list, it's pretty long. They make a lot of different products. There's no way they could have a dedicated line for every one, but many probably do. These lines typically run 24/7 (at least the ones I worked at did), and only shut down for maintenance. We're talking millions and millions of chips. How many gluten-free ones do you thing they would sell. And then you've got half the people thinking they're sensitive to all kinds of other stuff. Where does it stop? How many gluten-free, dairy free, cassein free, vegan, soy free, etc. etc. etc. chips do you think they would sell. And no matter what they would make, half the people are still gonna think they got a reaction from it anyway!

And concerning the leftover residue. There's no way to estimate that without visiting a plant and watching how well they do at cleaning the equipment. But if it's as small as they seem to indicate, lets hope that the majority of celiacs can live with it. That would mean there's hope for a lot of celiacs to live normal lives being exposed to low levels of gluten from whatever source.

best regards, lm

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I do not eat Frito-Lay products because I have had reactions to them in the past, AmandaD.

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Thanks guys, I think what I'm going to do is let my husband and kids have them, but I probably won't eat them myself (we're having chili tonite)...:o).

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why were other posts erased? Alot of people have had contamination problems with fritos and gluten including myself...

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why were other posts erased? Alot of people have had contamination problems with fritos and gluten including myself...

I'm confused -- we don't erase posts unless the are spam --

Are you looking for this thread?

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I've been missing the BBQ corn chips. This week I made a fantastic purchase with those new Planters Black Chipotle nuts--yuuummmy. A small handful and you get the yummy taste of bbq fritos w/o the gluten. And they work easily into my diet. :lol:

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I gave up eating anything from Frito-Lay. I always had a reaction to Fritos, Lays chips, or any of their other products, so even though the ingredients are not gluten-containing, I have to assume that there is significant cross-contamination on their lines. And I used to love Fritos.

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I never stopped eating Frito Lay products that do not contain wheat in the ingredients.

I was diagnosed with Celiac Disease by positive endoscopy with biopsies 3 years & 3 months age. I immediately went on a totally gluten-free diet, and immediately began to feel better. All my symptoms went away, I gained all my weight back, and as far as I know, I am completely healed and healthy.

I eat nachos made with Tostidos every day. Also, queso with Tostidos almost every day. I frequently eat plain Fritos, plain Lay's potato chips, plain Ruffles, plain Cheetos - crunchy & baked. Plus a variety of other Frito Lay products without wheat ingredients.

I've never once had any reaction to any Frito Lay product I've eaten.

best regards, lm

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Just to add my two cents from the super sensitive crowd (5 years in): 2 years ago I ate regular Fritos for many months, sometimes feeling okay, often not. After an elimination diet it became clear the Fritos were the culprit. Unfortunately, I am one of those for whom dedicated lines are essential. Once I took them out, no more problems.

Consequently, I eat VERY few processed foods and dedicated companies or dedicated lines are essential.

lisa

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Consequently, I eat VERY few processed foods and dedicated companies or dedicated lines are essential.

This is true for me too. I was diagnosed almost 5 years ago and choose to not eat Lay's regular products (I do eat Stax). I loved the naturals line, but I'd be fine with one bag, and not with another. I decided it wasn't worth getting sick over.

I absolutely need to steer clear of products made on shared lines--I can say that without exception I always react to them. Sometimes it takes repeated exposure, but it catches up with me.

I feel absolutely fine if I stick with either naturally gluten-free foods or those made on dedicated lines or a few from trusted companies that will disclose.

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