Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

Teeth Grinding In Sleep
0

36 posts in this topic

Read up on gluten sensitivity... on of the primary ways gluten affects people with the sensitivity is by triggering an auto-immune (against one's own tissues) reaction against nerves and brain... so, now ask yourself, if gluten can trigger your own immune system to attack YOUR OWN nerves and BRAIN tissues due to misidentification by the antibodies, between the proteins in your own brain tissues, and gluten proteins... would that be considered 'STRESS' in the BRAIN? An intangible attack on one's own brain tissues by one's own antibodies -- how's that NOT stress? The cross-reactivity that gluten sensitivity can be triggered by other things which contain no gluten as well. Google gluten cross-reactive foods. Coffee is one, dairy, eggs, soy, rice, corn. It's because the immune system doesn't check the entire protein. So it can misidentify other proteins as invaders as long as enough of the protein is similar. A gluten sensitive person's auto-immune reaction can be triggered by other proteins which are similar.

So, if something is attaching your brain/nerves/tissues, how does it NOT make sense that there could be some visceral intangible 'anguish' / stress that would cause one to be tense, and grind ones teeth?  Bruxism.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

Hi there. 

 

This thread is seven years old and it is very unlikely that the posters will see your reply.  You are welcome to start a new thread if you like.

 

Colleen

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi there. 

 

This thread is seven years old and it is very unlikely that the posters will see your reply.  You are welcome to start a new thread if you like.

 

Colleen

but someone may find this the same way i did...  a top google search result when searching for "gluten sensitivity  bruxism".

old knowledge mixes will with new knowledge when it come to clarifying understanding...

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

here's some - cross-reactivity is a myth  :)  meaning, there is no science to support this theory.  

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

but someone may find this the same way i did...  a top google search result when searching for "gluten sensitivity  bruxism".

old knowledge mixes will with new knowledge when it come to clarifying understanding...

 

 

I did not say the information was worthless.  This is why the thread is still live.  I told you that you may not get responses from this thread and you may start a new one if you please.  There is an FAQ section that might interest you and help you navigate the site.

 

 

Colleen

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




 The cross-reactivity that gluten sensitivity can be triggered by other things which contain no gluten as well. Google gluten cross-reactive foods. Coffee is one, dairy, eggs, soy, rice, corn. It's because the immune system doesn't check the entire protein. So it can misidentify other proteins as invaders as long as enough of the protein is similar. A gluten sensitive person's auto-immune reaction can be triggered by other proteins which are similar.

 

 

 

ah yes,that googling thing can be a crap shoot when diagnosing oneself with health issues.  

 

We tend to look at valid sources of information like the University of Chicago Celiac center

 

We aren’t familiar with any foods that show evidence of cross-reactivity.

 

http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/archives/tag/cross-reactive-foods

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

careful, Google isn't the source... but googling did land me on this page... does that invalidate the site?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

by the way, you're not citing a study, or a source. You are literally citing their statement of nescience. They are unaware. I. e. they do not know about it. Which is worlds different from having actually scientifically studied it first hand and made biochemical observations which disprove cross reactivity....

they are admitting that they are unaware, and haven't stated any intention of studying it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

careful, Google isn't the source... but googling did land me on this page... does that invalidate the site?

no, but not everything on here is "solid gold info" either. People post a lot of opinions...that does not make it "factual "

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

by the way, you're not citing a study, or a source. You are literally citing their statement of nescience. They are unaware. I. e. they do not know about it. Which is worlds different from having actually scientifically studied it first hand and made biochemical observations which disprove cross reactivity....

they are admitting that they are unaware, and haven't stated any intention of studying it.

 

 

 "we are unaware of"  is  a polite way of saying "it's unproven".

 

Take a stroll through PubMed...there's no evidence there. Believe me, I've looked.

 

If any celiac researchers thought this was a hazard to celiacs, they'd publish the information and tell us to stop eating those foods.

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

careful, Google isn't the source... but googling did land me on this page... does that invalidate the site?

  

by the way, you're not citing a study, or a source. You are literally citing their statement of nescience. They are unaware. I. e. they do not know about it. Which is worlds different from having actually scientifically studied it first hand and made biochemical observations which disprove cross reactivity....

they are admitting that they are unaware, and haven't stated any intention of studying it.

Well... You are just trying to be contrary but I will give an answer for others that might want to know - we cite the Univ of Chicago Celiac center because they have the easiest site to link to. They answer questions in an easy to understand manner. They are celiac researchers and have many published studies. They work with other researchers throughout the world. They hosted the International Celiac Disease Symposium this past Sept with researchers from around the world. I went. Several researchers said there is no evidence of Cross- reactivity.

Sometimes, there is no published study to say something doesn't exist because, really? Why would you need to disprove everything someone questioned? How do you disprove something that makes no sense? I have never met you in person. How do I prove that? It would be up to you to prove you have actually met me.

If you would like to discuss the theory of cross- reactivity, please start a new thread as that is not the topic of this old dormant thread. Please be prepared to show some actual scientific proof of your theory to discuss.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      104,352
    • Total Posts
      920,503
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • I already did. Thats how i found the place. Its amazing to actually go to a restraunt again.
    • This is EXACTLY what happens to me. It has twice now and both times was after both glutening episodes but once it was the day after and the other time it was a week and a half. So I'm still not sure if it's related or strange bug bites...

      Did they stop happening when she stopped being glutened? Did you decide they were definitely related? I'm really confused by this and would love to know whether to insecticide my house or....
    • Thankyou both! I was wondering if my high levels left much doubt on the diagnosis. I don't see the GI until the 15th Sep and I don't think I can stand to eat gluten in that time. If he tells me to I will do so after then. After 25 years of symptoms I don't think there is much chance of healing my bowel In a couple of weeks. I'm actually terrified of the damage they might find. But I think I will need the endo since there may be other things going on with me. So great they didn't put your son through the biopsy! Once I have a formal diagnosis I have my kids to worry about also. I can't even stand the thought of my daughter having a blood test. I think she would need to be sedated as she is so fearful and pain sensitive. My son is not yet 2 so I don't think they will test him. I'm feeling so off at the moment. I think I have some anxiety and reflux going on complicating things quite a bit.
    • My son's antibodies were 300. Based on his extremely high levels, his pediatric GI suggested genetic testing instead of the biopsy. Genetic testing can't diagnose celiac on its own but combined with such high levels, the gi dr was confident a positive genetic test would confidently diagnose celiac. He warned that biopsies are small snapshots of the intestine and can miss damage. He said this is an approach used very often in Europe but not as much in the US. What sold me on that approach was the ability to put my son directly on a gluten free diet instead of waiting three weeks for the biopsy, during which time he would continue to eat gluten and feel terrible. I'm not sure if this is more common with younger patients though (our son is two), based on the idea that he's had less time to inflict damage that would show in a biopsy? We are very happy that we immediately started the gluten free diet and chose the genetic testing. Our son got the proper diagnosis and his recent number shows a drop to 71 after only 4.5 months gluten free! Not sure if this helps. Good luck and I hope you feel better soon!
    • We have been off gluten for a while now, and symptoms return when I've allowed gluten full meals… so something still isn't sitting right with me.  Checking with her doc about seeing a pediactric GI although I'm not sure how long that will take since we live in small town America. I know she didn't get at least one of the recommended full panel tests but maybe two, can someone help clarify, or is she missing two? DGP for sure and possibly EMA? And if I understand what I'm reading in other posts that the DGP can be more accurate? Thanks Her blood panel results: Ttg ab iga <.5u/ml ttg igg <.8u/ml aga ab iga <.2 u/ml aga an igg <.7u/ml iga 61mg/dL  
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      61,417
    • Most Online
      1,763

    Newest Member
    Suzette Porter
    Joined