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My Diet Is Not Like Most Of Yours
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51 posts in this topic

I hope it's okay to post this here, but several people have asked for the recipe, so I thought this would be the place for them to find it.

Flaxmeal Pancakes or Waffles

You can fix these two ways, either by cooking like pancakes in a pan, the recipe makes three good sized ones (the benefit of this is that later in the day, if you have any left over, they make an alternative to bread for an open faced sandwich or something. The drawback to pancakes is that they do take quite some time to cook!) If you have a non-stick waffle maker (mine makes 4 waffles at a time) this recipe makes three (I just leave the fourth space empty OR triple the recipe and freeze the extras. They reheat in the toaster wonderfully.) Waffles are a lot quicker.

2 eggs

3 Tbs ground flaxseed (flaxmeal)

1 Tbs orange flavored Metamucil (or psyllium husks and 2 tsp sugar or sweetener)*

1 tsp baking powder

Whisk/stir till combined, let sit while preheating waffle iron or pans. It will thicken quite a bit.

Pour into an oiled skillet and brown on both sides or ladel into a waffle iron and cook according to manufacturer's directions.

Makes 1 generous serving.

*I know it sounds bizarre using Metamucil, but I really like the orange flavoring in the recipe and the time I made them without, my son noticed the difference and didn't like them as much. (So I just don't let anyone know I'm using it and it works out fine. Lol!)

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Ruth: I had (and occasionally still have) that right lower abdominal pain which also comes and goes with gas or stool passage. Prior to learning I had celiac disease, I started taking magnesium supplements to help with what I thought was constipaton (bloating, gas and occasional hard stools). Going gluten-free helped some, but avoiding DAIRY completely resolved irregularity and hard/floating/mucous coated stools. HOWEVER, I still try to eat lots of fiber from fruits, vegies and the higher fiber gluten-free breads, pastas and pastries. I really hesitate to use laxative/fiber supplements, since I'm already paying enough for digestive enzymes and probiotics. :o Many gluten-free breads, pastas, cookies, etc. are VERY low fiber (maybe they assume people with diarrhea don't need fiber?? :huh: ). Nevertheless, Ener-G foods has some relatively high fiber breads (Harvest, Corn Loaf and Brown Rice Sweet Potato English muffins). Meanwhile, I find that the longer avoid gluten/dairy/soy products, the less I notice any abdominal problems. I believe my abdominal pain (which felt like I had to 'go' but was constipated) really was related to damage from gluten/casein/soy reactions. After almost 5 months gluten-free and several months dairy free I now have MUCH less bloating and gas, only occasional twinges of pain and NO irregularity. So hang in there ... while avoiding the foods which your body has indicated you can't tolerate ... healing, after long undiagnosed celiac disease, takes time. ;)

BURDEE

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Burdee, Thanks for your good ideas. So far I am eating only the foods that I think I tolerate from Elaine Gottschalk's diet plan. My diet consists of meats: poultry (chicken and turkey), fish (pollock, canned salmon, haven't tried mackerel yet, eventually will check out tuna that doesn't have added ingredients. Says it is put up in water, but has this other stuff with it) , vegetables:romaine, celery, carrots, lima beans pureed, green beans, other dry beans prepared according to this diet plan, rutabagas, broccoli (not often), mushrooms, Fruits: bananas, cantalope, have tried mangoes, think they bother me. Yesterday I made a fruit salad with cantalope, bananas, canned pineapple in its own juice, 2 peaches. I had company. I also had brown rice for the first time since mid-August. The rice is allowed on most gluten-free diets, but not on the one I have been following. I suspect the raw celery may be giving me trouble. I also eat peanut butter, almond butter, honey (seldom) , olive oil for salad dressing. I am using Procreatin and acidophilus for digestive enzymes. I am almost out of Procreatin and the health food store didn't have any in last week. So I am cutting backon that until Thursday. I have been experimenting with lactase tabs and yogurt. That may be giving me extra trouble this week, also. I suspect I need to try eliminating one

I did have one day several weeks ago when I felt fairly good all day. I had driven to Mankato to try on shoes. Started out on an empty stomach since I was having my cholesterol checked. Had a banana and egg after my test. Then another banana and hard boiled egg at noon , I take along a cooler. Did not have any celery. But had had the day before. Can't remember what I had for supper, but apparently eggs and bananas don't bother me. At least not with an immediate reaction. . My main pain problem is the burning across my upper ab starting under right side of right rib cage. Gall bladder is gone. Bowel problem is mainly all or nothing. Have tried the past few days taking a tbsp of mineral oil and a tblsp of Milk of Magnesia at bedtime. That has produced stool each day so far, but clumpy and hard to pass. And the burning is much worse. I haven't eaten any bread or other baked goods not even those made of gluten-free ingredients, since my mid- August

"downfall" . I guess I have been trying to see that I get enough of the basic nutrients . I did add mushrooms lately. Thanks again, Ruth Any further ideas, esp. re the upper burning would be appreciated.

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FreyaUSA, Thanks for the flaxseed meal recipe. It sounds like a good one! Ruth

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coin-op = he :) I only visit this site a couple times a year, to check out celiac research.

Didn't mean to offend, my wording just sucks. I'm actually somewhat envious of celiacs that have all that freedom to enjoy the general celiac diet. A few people said each diet needs to suit the individual, which is true.

Wclemens, your diet sounds interesting, sort of like mine, except for the icecream

part. Occasionally my diet expands and contracts a bit, depending on what new things i might want to try.

My mother and sister have diets somewhat like the people on this board, except my mother cannot do the starches, rising agents, etc (baking powder, potato/rice starch, xanthan gum, etc).

I would like to know what more longtime celiacs are eating nowadays (ie 15+yrs celiac diet). I suspect that these diets get more strict as a person stays on the diet longer. I know of 2 other long time celiacs that have refined thier diets, out of necessity, like i have. For me, this refinement process started about 10 years back, esp with cooked meats, tuna, chicken and such. I grew lactose intolerant shortly after i got mono, about 14 yrs ago i think. The last 5 years have been very stable, with few refinements.

As far as being nutrient deficient and such, there is more poor diet and nutrition science going around then there is good. I always encourage people to search out the truth on such matters. It is always interesting once you get to it. I'll leave it at that :)

-c

btw, beano contains potassium sorbate, which I cannot have.

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Life without potatoes, broccoli, or brussel sprouts would just not be life at all. I will just have to suffer if I shouldn't have them! I do limit the potatoes because of the starch, but a 32 oz bag of steamed broccoli is one of this family's favorite tv snacks...especially now that we can douse it in cheese again.

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Good to hear from you again, coin-op! It's always nice to have the input of long-term celiacs on this site. While I've only been gluten free for 3 years, my diet is very similar to yours. Steamed lundberg rice, potato in small doses, most fruits, plain fish, eggs, vegetables, Bacardi and Smirnoff, and olive or peanut oils. Every 2 weeks or so I'll try introducing something new, usually without luck. I don't know how someone can become so hypersensitive, but I guess I can deal. No chapstick or such. I grind my own flour from rice and dried potato. I dry out fruit to make snacks and such. Make my own juice. I haven't felt this good since I was a kid, and the boys that I race with on the mountain bike team have even noticed-I'm faster than about half of them and can keep up with the rest now :lol: I just have a few questions-did you have straight up gluten reactions to things like meat and such? Or other intolerances? I am definetely intolerant to soy (different reaction than to gluten), but I've had gluten reactions to some of the strangest things. Also, specific brands you use?

Peace-

Nadia

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Lol! I would have said that life WITH brussel sprouts just isn't worth it! :-) I've hated those things since I was a kid. I'm with ya on the broccoli though. ;-)

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Ok, let's be fair. When I first read coin-ops post I was a little offended. Then I went back and read it, she had spelled educated wrong and I thought HA. Then I noticed she/he put a smiley face by it. I think her diet is lacking in many vitamins and maybe we can help her with a little variety. Remember each of us have adjusted in our own way. We all keep gluten out. And I for one am very thankful for all of you that have helped add variety and new things too my diet. There have even been many times that I have learned about new foods that are gluten-free. So coin-op welcome.

Forever the peacekeeper (or at least trying) B)

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Where is pastor dave? Too bad he is not a registered member. I need that recipe for gluten-free German Chocolate cake. My mother used to make it every year for my birthday and I don't know what I will do without it this year.

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Actually, I think the "edumacated" part was a Homer Simpson. He throws "ma" in the middle of a lot of words, including "educated/edumacated" and "saxophone/saxamaphone."

At any rate, I am sorry to hear of such a limited diet but can understand the refining project. I keep finding more and more things that cause me problems when I eat them. I'm really tired of this process.

Fortunately, I can eat broccoli and the LOVELY Brussels sprouts (I always loved those, even as a kid!) Just can't be broccoli or veggies that are raw and rinsed in Fit or some other citric acid spray not listed on the package. I hope that one day (yeah right) all these additives will be listed on the package so people who actually spend time at home sick from work because of ingesting them can make informed choices.

Aargh, I better end this now because I feel a rant against food producers coming on...

Stephanie

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Just can't be broccoli or veggies that are raw and rinsed in Fit or some other citric acid spray not listed on the package.
:o Really? Oh no! What is "Fit" I eat a lot of 100% frozen veggies mixes. Would these have those additives in them?

Obviously any veggies could have traces of pesticides or preserving chemicals if they are not organic. And even orgain growers sometimes use pesticides, so I guess you can't get away from it. But, if we didn't have pesticides we would not have all the food in our grocery stores.

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Mel and I have been talking about this on another thread - Fit and similar sprays have citric acid in them and citric acid is mainly made from fermenting a sugar with aspergillus niger, which is a mold. Many restaurants use sprays/rinses like these because they clean the veggies well and don't contain sulfites (illegal). I used to get sick after eating salad at some restaurants. One of them is Outback. I will be sick within 30 mins. I think it's an allergy for me but have not been tested.

Anyway, if interested, I just found a whole slew of foods that are made with aspergillus (various types) and funny thing is, I can't eat any of them without having some problem.

PRODUCTS OF ASPERGILLUS FERMENTATION:

SOY SAUCE

CHOCOLATE

TEA (BLACK)

MALT EXTRACT (MOST CEREALS)

LACTAID (MILK ADDITIVE)

SOME VITAMINS - SOLGAR AND JARROW brands ARE SAFE; MOST ARE NOT

CITRIC ACID (A VERY COMMON FOOD ADDITIVE; NOT DERIVED FROM CITRUS FRUIT)

SOFT DRINKS (Citric acid is made with the aspergillus fermentation process)

FRUIT JUICE (COMMERCIAL-OFTEN MADE FROM MOLDY FRUIT; MANY CONTAIN MOLD ENZYMES ADDED IN PROCESSING)

DIGESTIVE ENZYMES (PANCREATIC ARE ALRIGHT), OTHERS ARE NOT

CHOLESTEROL LOWERING ENZYMES

ACIDOPHILUS WITH F.O.S. (Acidophilus has very healing effects and promotes natural anti-fungals in the body, however, artificially produced F.O.S. is made with the aspergillus fermentation process.  If you would like natural F.O.S., you can consume watermelon seeds and reap the same nutritional benefits without any aspergillus fermentation).

http://www.mold-survivor.com/dietcopyright...20FERMENTATION:

I also read on another site that some sorts of ham are made with aspergillus. I always feel weird (stomach ache, headache) after eating ham. Black tea makes me feel very sick if I drink it a couple of days in a row, but green or white tea are fine with me. Last night I had a bunch of raspberries that were borderline moldy - I read today that aspergillus is the main mold on fruit and veggies. I have been sick since dinner last night - thought the salad we brought had a citric acid wash on it, but now I'm blaming the berries.

There is this one brand of organic veggie at the store that must use citric acid on the veggies (fresh, in the produce section) that gives me symptoms, too. Citric acid can be organic so I guess that is ok to use. Just depressing to me though that they don't have to list that stuff on the package.

So weird when something like this all falls into place...

Stephanie

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Oh wow, I did not know all that. Thanks for taking the time to explain :D

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No problem. I'm kind of excited because it explains a lot of adverse food reactions I have. I hope it helps someone else, too, because I have not found a good site that puts it all together.

:) :) :)

Stephanie

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PS in case any of you were sad for me, chocolate does not seem to have an adverse effect on me. But I don't eat a ton of it and when I do I get the really good stuff (dark chocolate!!!) so maybe I'm avoiding some of the mold...

:D

Stephanie

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I've been on the diet 16+ years and find that my diet is expanding as more and more gluten free products come on the market. I did have issues with dairy early in the diet, but they sorted themselves out, although I find serving amounts is what is important. When introducing foods the serving amount needs to be very small and expanded as your body gets used to it.

Small discomforts tend to sort themselves out when the new food is tried several times. The cabbage family is pretty much avoided cooked, although I do use the cabbage family raw in salads. I find it is less gassy than when cooked, and the amount is small at a time.

I think when we try new things that we have been without for a long time we tend to get a little 'piggy' and run into problems that way. :D Especially with the lovely sugar products that have evolved in our stores over the years.

I was a few years ago having problems with some fruits, but can now go out and pick the plums, pears, apples and cherries in the orchard and make a pig of myself without problems. Strangely enough though, I only eat small amounts of the stuff I can and I use a very light syrup when doing so. I've never had any problems with the berry crops.

It really is very funny what we can and can't tollerate. I try everything Gluten Free often. If I can't tollerate it after four or five tries of tiny amounts, then I leave it for another year or so. Our bodies, I think do go through changes over the years. What you couldn't tollerate five years ago, may be okay if you introduce it very slowly again now. The problem may be giving up too quickly or taking too large a serving the first time out. :rolleyes:

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I think when we try new things that we have been without for a long time we tend to get a little 'piggy' and run into problems that way.
:lol: That is so funny because I can so relate. LOL!
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Might explain why I'm allergic to most of the

items in the "moldy" list :D

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Dear Coin-op:

I think most of us have put a lot of research into food and products that are gluten free. We are a support group and we have for the most part supported each other through many different things both good and bad.

We don't judge each other and try very hard to just be there to talk or whatever it is someone needs.

Maybe you didn't mean to come off as judgemental. Please don't judge us and we won't judge you.

We support you and would like to hear about your experiences. When were you diagnosed with celiac? Tell us about your experiences and what led you to become vegan?

Welcome to the board :D

Sally

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I guess I am a little slow on the uptake. I just realized that I responded to a post that was old and I had already responded to it a few months ago. Sorry about that, I must have a little fog in my brain!

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Oh, that "piggy" description is so funny! That is me discovering those berry "Envirokids" rice bars at Whole Foods! :lol:

Thanks for the mold link -- my mom is allergic to almost everything on the planet and I think that link might help her.

Also, re: brussels sprouts, I never liked them *until* a friend fixed them halved and sauteed with lots of fresh chopped garlic and olive oil. I was eating them that way once a week for a while -- need to get back to that! It's really quick to prepare, too.

I tried finding prepared foods but because I'm also allergic to soy and casien, I posted of many diet woes and frustrations here, as a result, over the last several months. Now I eat mostly fresh, whole foods except for chocolate, those Envirokids bars every now and then -- and sometimes I make brownies or that cranberry dessert recipe elsewhere at this site (only I make it in a 9x12 pan so it is thin and crisp and more like a cobbler instead of a cake -- yum-ola).

I am studying to be a nutritionist and the program I am in stresses biochemical individuality -- we've all got the same basic human genetics, but there, the similarities end. So what works for one won't work for another, and vise-versa. It explains why so many of us have differences in our diets, and also means it is important for us to share all the differences! That mold page will be a HUGE help to my mom, who has tons of allergies, one of them mold.

westiepaws

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Hi Westiepaws:

I am looking for a westie. What do you think of them?

Thanks

Sally

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Just a few comments here... almost any veggie tastes great if you saute it in a pan with olive oil... do it over a fairly high heat so the veggie stays a bit crispy and it gets slightly browned on the outside. When its almost done add the garlic... it you add it earlier overcooked garlic doesn't taste all that good. Then eat... sometimes I deglaze the pan with the veggies with a tablespoon of balsamic vinegar and they are done and ready to eat. We do asperagus, broccoli, green beans, snow peas this way, very tasty. My 13 year old will eat almost any veggie this way.

I can't comment on a Westie as I've never had one but I have known a few and I've loved all of them. I keep saying my next dog will be one because I sort of like the idea of having a small dog I can take on some of my travels.

In general Terriers are wonderful dogs... I have an Airedale Terrier (as you probably guessed by her picture) and she is the most wonderful dog in the world. She is a clown for us, very tolerant of kids (when my daughter was younger they would dress her up in clothes, hats etc.) she is a good watch dog as well, very protective of her family, but most are not "aggressive" they are not biters and usually just will bark at intruders (which means anyone on our property). Terriers as a group are dogs that have loads of personality and are considered very smart... however, they do have a mind of their own and usually have fairly high energy requirments.. so our girl even at 8 needs playtime every day and all terriers need training starting from early on. I did that and got the most wonderful dog of my life (I've always had a dog, from day one of my life and a number of Airedales), she comes when she is called! She does all sorts of complicated tricks that were really easy to teach her. (she spins, army crawls, barks at certain words, finds certain toys by name, barks when the teapot boils (I burned up about 5 of them and decided it was time to teach the dog to tell me when the darn thing is boiling).

I'm a Terrier fan!

Susan

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almost any veggie tastes great if you saute it in a pan with olive oil... do it over a fairly high heat so the veggie stays a bit crispy and it gets slightly browned on the outside.
Veggies are so good like that! YUM!
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