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Gastroenteritis, Eosinophilic


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#1 pturse

 
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Posted 15 September 2004 - 08:41 AM

Does anyone have this? I received my blood test results back and everything was perfect except for my eosinophil count. The norm is supposed to be between 1 & 5% . . . I had 26%. Eosinophil also relates to asthma and allergies (both of which I think I might have) but there is something called Gastroenteritis Eosinophilic which is when the eosinophils are in the stomach lining and smaller intestines. It can cause a lot of the same symptoms as Celiac such as nausea and the big "D" we all suffer from and even cramping . . . I don't doubt that I have Celiacas well since I tested positive for it a year ago.

I was just curious if anyone has heard of this or if their eosinophil count was also that high. The treatment for it is prednisone which I am not fan of, I've heard too many horror stories.
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#2 pturse

 
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Posted 15 September 2004 - 11:00 AM

Just adding to information I found on this website:


Immune System Cells May Trigger Food Allergies and Gastrointestinal Inflammation


Copyright 1995-2004
Scott Adams.
Nature Immunology 2, 353 - 360 (April 2001)

Celiac.com 04/12/2001 - According to an article published in the April issue of Nature Immunology, Dr. Marc Rothenberg and colleagues at the Children's Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati, Ohio performed a series of experiments on mice which led them to the conclusion that white blood cells called eosinophils could be the cause of many food allergies and gastrointestinal inflammation. The researchers believe that the eosinophil cells, which are present throughout the body, mistakenly identify food proteins as germs in individuals with food allergies. When the intestinal lining of an allergic person is exposed to an allergen, a substance called eotaxin is released by the cells lining the intestine, which causes the eosinophil cells and other immune cells to attack them and release powerful proteins that destroy the surrounding tissues and cause eosinophilic inflammation.

The results of this study are unique because this is the first time eosinophils cells have been implicated in causing allergies, even though scientists have known for some time that they were present in great numbers at the sites of inflammation caused by reactions to food. The implication of this study is the possible development of drugs that stop this reaction from occurring, and thus prevent digestive inflammation and destruction that occurs when people with food allergies eat foods to which they are allergic. These results put scientists one step further in understanding how and why the digestive system is attacked in certain individuals, and a possible means of one day controlling the process.
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#3 Mark

 
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Posted 17 September 2004 - 03:03 PM

I don't know much about my eosinophil count, but I suppose having them increased is quite a standard in celiac. But, what's more interesting, cetirizini dihydrochloridum allergy pills label says that this stuff can hold the eosinophils back from moving. I took one pill 2 months ago for my pollinosis, and I noticed improvement in my gastro symptoms as well. The improvement was delayed 1-2 days, so I couldn't see the clear connection. Anyway, it could be worth further investigating.

MARK
gluten-free/CF since September 03
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