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Garlic Intolerance
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So I've been doing an elimination diet, and I was shocked to find out that I have a major garlic intolerance. There were two days in which I had just a pinch of garlic salt, and I had acid reflux and a general feeling of being unwell--fatigue, upset stomach, etc. The next day, I realized that it might be garlic that caused the problems, so I used a clove of fresh garlic in a meal that had all ingredients that I had tested to be safe. I had all of the same symptoms as a gluten encounter--D, abdominal pain, migraine, joint pain, nausea, upset stomach, acid reflux--everything. I had to take a lomodil, nausea pill (Phenargen), and prescription strength Pepcid and then after sleeping it off for three hours, I still felt awful. I even felt sick the next day as well. Now I know that I absolutely cannot cook with any garlic products--but it seems to be in all prepared foods (marinara, Amy's gluten-free products, etc). If anyone else is garlic intolerant, I'd love to hear how you substitute. Before I went into the hospital a few weeks ago, I was eating garlic in some form almost every day (especially in Adobo seasoning)--no wonder why I felt so sick!

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I avoid onions and garlic too . . . they cause reflux for me. I *really* miss garlic! I don't know of any good substitute, but what I do is add extra flavourful mushrooms (I like shitake and portabello) as well as fresh herbs (I grow oregano, sage, and rosemary in pots. Oregano and rosemary are really hard to kill off! They thrive in spite of neglect.)

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I'm allergic to the onion/garlic family and at the beginning, it was hard. I missed it! But using fresh and delicious herbs and tastes elsewhere really is just plain delicious. Now, when I smell garlic on people, it's actually relatively rank and over powering.

I had always had to avoid most prepared foods because of sulphites, and before celiac, I developed this allergy. I found it really tough, too, but just learned how to make all my favourites without it. It was hard at the beginning, but it gets easier.

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i've known for ages that onions make me sick, but only recently realized that garlic is probably a problem for me, too. i happen to love both of them. i get nauseated when i eat them. i think i can have a small amount, occasionally, without too much problem. where can you learn about using herbs--such as what goes with what?

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I don't ever cook with garlic or onions. I don't think I'm intolerant to them but they do bother me a little bit. From now on, you'll probably enjoy the other flavors in your food more, as garlic simply overpowers everything else, rather than actually enhancing flavors. I don't substitute anything for garlic in recipes. I simply leave it out.

If you don't already use a high quality sea salt, you might want to try that to really bring out flavors (celtic gray sea minerals is one of the best..and way better than garlic, IMO). :D

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Well it's encouraging to hear that you all cook without garlic and onions (I just tested onions last night and didn't have as totally horrible a reaction as I did with garlic, but I definitely had a problem! I took your advice about fresh herbs and bought fresh basil, oregano, and flat leaf parsley for starters. I made a great chicken dish with spinach, tomatoes, pine nuts, fresh basil and oregano, and feta cheese with just a bit of salt and pepper--it was delicious. I do have a good sea salt, but I haven't tried the one you mentioned, Mango04. I'll have to look it up and try it. Thanks!

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Well it's encouraging to hear that you all cook without garlic and onions (I just tested onions last night and didn't have as totally horrible a reaction as I did with garlic, but I definitely had a problem! I took your advice about fresh herbs and bought fresh basil, oregano, and flat leaf parsley for starters. I made a great chicken dish with spinach, tomatoes, pine nuts, fresh basil and oregano, and feta cheese with just a bit of salt and pepper--it was delicious. I do have a good sea salt, but I haven't tried the one you mentioned, Mango04. I'll have to look it up and try it. Thanks!

I'm still not getting the results I want from gluten free, so I'm thinking about an elimination diet. What's the best way to do it? Any great websites that really explain how to do it effectively?

Geoff

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I'm still not getting the results I want from gluten free, so I'm thinking about an elimination diet. What's the best way to do it? Any great websites that really explain how to do it effectively?

Geoff

I actually asked about this a few weeks ago, and dlp252 was kind enough to forward her doctor's information on the elimination diet to me through a PM. You may want to check with her, or I can just try to forward the information on. The diet she followed, and the one that I've subsequently started, is a modified elimination diet. At times, it seems like a bit of a pain, but I've still gotten to eat a bunch of great food as I learn about what I can handle and what I can't.

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I took your advice about fresh herbs and bought fresh basil, oregano, and flat leaf parsley for starters. I made a great chicken dish with spinach, tomatoes, pine nuts, fresh basil and oregano, and feta cheese with just a bit of salt and pepper--it was delicious. I do have a good sea salt, but I haven't tried the one you mentioned, Mango04. I'll have to look it up and try it. Thanks!

The chicken dish sounds wonderful. I'm interested in trying the specialty sea salt too. I use sea salt, but I generally go for the less expensive sea salt. . . . I think, though, that all my dietary restrictions warrant splurging on food.

On the elimination diet issue---My allergist put me on one of those a couple of years ago. I found this book really helpful:

http://www.bullpub.com/foodallergies.html (bought it at chapters)

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Well it's encouraging to hear that you all cook without garlic and onions (I just tested onions last night and didn't have as totally horrible a reaction as I did with garlic, but I definitely had a problem! I took your advice about fresh herbs and bought fresh basil, oregano, and flat leaf parsley for starters. I made a great chicken dish with spinach, tomatoes, pine nuts, fresh basil and oregano, and feta cheese with just a bit of salt and pepper--it was delicious. I do have a good sea salt, but I haven't tried the one you mentioned, Mango04. I'll have to look it up and try it. Thanks!

Suggestions....

You can try cooking the garlic whole and taking it out... or fry gently in oil and use the oil etc. it all depends whihc part you are allergic to.

Also since you sorta tolerate onions you could try chives...?

Again you can cook with them and strain them out.. same with shallots ... I can't promise it will work but its probably worth a go.,

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I don't like garlic so I just leave it out of my recipes. If it's something Italian, I use Italian seasoning, making sure to buy a brand that doesn't include garlic. Last summer I bought some green onion sets that were garlic flavored. My daughter loved them. I didn't, because they did taste of garlic. I don't know if those would work for you or not. Could be they are actually a type of garlic.

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Can I jump in here with a question?

My daughter is slightly intolerant to garlic. How would you go about fixing "greens" (collard, kale etc) withough garlic? Collard greens are particularly tasty with garlic and that is the only recipe I have of it. My children will actually eat it that way.

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Can I jump in here with a question?

My daughter is slightly intolerant to garlic. How would you go about fixing "greens" (collard, kale etc) withough garlic? Collard greens are particularly tasty with garlic and that is the only recipe I have of it. My children will actually eat it that way.

I don't know about collard greens, but when I cook kale (or kale with spinach) I sautee it in olive oil. When it's cooked I add lemon and salt. I don't know if that's kid friendly enough though.

Kale is also really cool when you chop it up into really small pieces and add it to rice dishes and such. That way you can't taste it too much :rolleyes:, but the dish looks really appealing and colorful :D.

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Both garlic and onions kill off candida. The reaction could be caused by a candida overgrowth and die-off.

I'd take good probiotics, avoid sugar and simple carbs, then re-challenge the intolerance. When I was loaded with candida, I couldn't stand garlic or onions. As I treated the candida, I ate a lot of both to help kill off the yeast.

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Hi!

I don't know if this is still relevant, but have you considered garlic chives? I grow them in my herb garden and just snip off what I need when I cook. They are part of the onion family, but you eat the green leaves not the bulbs. However, if someone knows that you can't eat chives even if you have an intolerance to onion and garlic bulbs, please correct me if I'm wrong.

Best wishes,

Kim

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