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Bipolar And Celiac Disease


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#1 DeniseJarvis

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Posted 01 March 2007 - 07:30 AM

Bipolar and Celiac Disease

Does anyone know of a correlation of Bipolar Disorder and Celiac? Does anyone know of any information of people diagnosed as bipolar, but really having Celiac disease, and no longer needing their medication for bipolar disorder any longer?

Thanks.

Denise.
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From the book: “Grain Damage, rethinking the High Starch Diet. The grain-free diet is not radical. It is ultraconservative.” - by Dr. Douglas Graham:

(I quote)

If we were all crazy, who could tell?

A Little Crazy?

Gluten, a protein found in many grain products, has been named as a causative factor in several psychoses and neurological disorders. It has been proven to chemically contain fifteen different opioid sequences, or morphine-like molecules. Opioids that come from outside the body are called “exorphins.” Exorphins are labelled by scientists as addictive and neurotoxic. They have psychoactive properties and cause related behavioral problems such as addictive eating patterns. Since the mid 1960s, scientist have repeatedly linked gluten consumption to learning disorders and schizophrenia.

Physical effects of opioid consumption include nausea, sedation, truncal rigidity, euphoria, dysphoria, and miosis (pupillary contraction). Opioids are known to interfere with our neurotransmitter chemistry, cause various types of epilepsy, and result in digestive disturbances such as constipation, urinary retention, biliary spasm, reduced production of ADH (an antidiuretic hormone that results in reduced urine production), slowed gastric emptying, and slowed digestion.

Could we all have gone a little crazy?


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#2 celiacgirls

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Posted 01 March 2007 - 09:12 AM

I don't know of any studies. I do know my daughter was probably, according to her therapist, on the path to getting dx'ed with bipolar. She was diagnosed ODD/depression. Another doctor suggested she had Intermittent Explosive Disorder. She is not off from her antidepressant yet but we are tapering very slowly. The only time she acts that way now is when she has had gluten or casein.

I'm convinced there are people diagnosed with bipolar who really have gluten and/or casein intolerance. My daughter looks bipolar to me when she has had casein. One minute she is happy and within 10 minutes she has turned into an aggressive, mean, unreasonable person. If I didn't know she reacted to casein, I would think it came out of nowhere. Gluten doesn't cause a reaction as quickly but does make her more irritable.

This isn't for bipolar but I was able to go off my a/d starting 2 days after going gluten-free.
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Karen

gluten free 4/06
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DQ1, DQ8

Daughter (11) gluten free 5/06, casein free 6/06

Daughter (9) gluten free 3/06, casein free 7/06, soy free, trying peanut free
vegetarian
gluten lite on and off since 1999

All dx'ed by Enterolab

#3 The One

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Posted 01 March 2007 - 09:24 AM

I don't know if this is what you are looking for, though they don't talk about Bipolar in this article, they talk of a way to reverse psychiatric disorders caused by Celiac or other diseases. I would think that if schizophrenia can be reversed this way, then bipolar could too. There's even people who don't need a treatment other than a strict gluten free diet, it will take a long time though, possibly years until you see a difference.

http://autoimmunedis...atric_disorders
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#4 confused

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Posted 01 March 2007 - 09:27 AM

Bipolar and Celiac Disease

Does anyone know of a correlation of Bipolar Disorder and Celiac? Does anyone know of any information of people diagnosed as bipolar, but really having Celiac disease, and no longer needing their medication for bipolar disorder any longer?

Thanks.

Denise.


I would love to hear more this, My grandma was bi-polar and so was her twin. We also have a few that are on dperession/anxiety meds, and would be interested to know if their is an connection, or if their problems could lessen if they got rid of gluten. my grandma passed away 2 yrs ago, so i will never know, but it would have been nice to know more about celiac years ago

paula
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gluten, casein and soy free
on low carb/low sugar diet

#5 eLaurie

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Posted 01 March 2007 - 03:58 PM

Bipolar II or 'soft' bipolar is my diagnosis. I've had alternating anxiety/hypomania/insomnia and non-situational depression since childhood.

I've only been gluten free for 7 months; from what I understand from others, it can take 18 months gluten-free for symptom resolution. Then others have told me they're much improved years out, but still feel they have some permanent neurological damage with associated psychiatric symptoms.

Here's a link to an old thread which has a link in the last post to yet another related thread.

http://www.glutenfre...showtopic=11800
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#6 DeniseJarvis

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Posted 01 March 2007 - 06:22 PM

This is just unbelievable, to find all this information. I just want to thank everyone so much, for the info, and links you posted. I have just been reading and reading and reading, taking it all it.

It just makes you want to cry. For what everyone had to go through unnecessarily, just because of ‘gluten’. If only everyone would be aware of gluten intolerance and Celiac Disease. It causes so many illnesses.

I had depression mostly all my life, it was very bad. Such black, darkness within my heart. And to only be gluten-free for 28 days, and have no depression at all anymore. And the brain fog, gone. And having such clear thinking now. And the ‘happiness’.

It is just all unbelievable and sort of hard to take all in. The change that happens to you. It’s like going back to a time that once you knew of some happiness, some clear headedness, and to be at that place again. It’s almost like a miracle, feels like a miracle took place.

It’s unbelievable, you want to tell EVERYONE about this. I think the whole world suffers from eating grain (gluten). I don’t believe grain was meant for human consumption, I really don’t. I think it was only meant for maybe certain animals to digest. Not for humans. The damage it causes to us, the neurological damage, there is no way grain could have ever been meant, for us humans to eat it.

Just thanks again for your posts. You have all helped me so much. I am still just overcome with finding out about gluten intolerance and celiac. It is unbelievable….

To think how much we have all suffered. Just because of ‘grain’. And how we feel so great, off it. Unbelievable.

I was told I had a learning disability when I was a young child, and only 28 days off gluten, I feel I don’t even have that anymore either. Unbelievable…. I feel like a kid again. Like I’m becoming a kid again, with this clear thinking. My life has changed, so drastically, in such a short period of time, all because I don’t eat grain (gluten) anymore.

Thank you all so much, for your posts. I greatly appreciate it.

All the best to all of you. And good health to you all.

Take care,
Denise.
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From the book: “Grain Damage, rethinking the High Starch Diet. The grain-free diet is not radical. It is ultraconservative.” - by Dr. Douglas Graham:

(I quote)

If we were all crazy, who could tell?

A Little Crazy?

Gluten, a protein found in many grain products, has been named as a causative factor in several psychoses and neurological disorders. It has been proven to chemically contain fifteen different opioid sequences, or morphine-like molecules. Opioids that come from outside the body are called “exorphins.” Exorphins are labelled by scientists as addictive and neurotoxic. They have psychoactive properties and cause related behavioral problems such as addictive eating patterns. Since the mid 1960s, scientist have repeatedly linked gluten consumption to learning disorders and schizophrenia.

Physical effects of opioid consumption include nausea, sedation, truncal rigidity, euphoria, dysphoria, and miosis (pupillary contraction). Opioids are known to interfere with our neurotransmitter chemistry, cause various types of epilepsy, and result in digestive disturbances such as constipation, urinary retention, biliary spasm, reduced production of ADH (an antidiuretic hormone that results in reduced urine production), slowed gastric emptying, and slowed digestion.

Could we all have gone a little crazy?


#7 sherylj

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Posted 01 March 2007 - 08:12 PM

Denise, I am diagnosed Bipolar Type II and I would love the wheat free diet to make that go away. I felt intense joy when first diagnosed that I finally had "control" over my disease.

Yes, I do have control over my diet. But my Bipolar diagnosis is still there and I am still taking my meds. The first post I wrote was asking "can I ease off my meds now??" And the answer was it would not be a good idea. I did arrange to cut back on one of my antidepressants and feel really good about that.

I don't know what your situation is..it sounds like you are feeling really great right now and the gluten free diet is working for you. I have only been gluten free for three weeks and I've been having those "Quaker" rice cakes which I hear are contaminated,,,so even though I have no gastro symptoms,,my mood is subdued right now and I have other stuff going on in my life which is putting me on the blah side.

Try researching bipolar and celiac and see if there is are any clinical trials being done..Hey at this point I would volunteer to be in a trial (ha,,as long as I get to be in the gluten free control group)!!!!!!!!!! We all know ingesting gluten makes us feel worse so It only makes sense no gluten makes us feel better but with bipolar is a whole different ball game!

Keep up with the gluten free...you will continue to feel better.

I wish all the best for you. Keep us all posted. Sherylj :)
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#8 DingoGirl

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Posted 01 March 2007 - 08:55 PM

Hi Denise, adn welcome to the forum!

I am bipolar type II also and have had a really crazy life. I was diagnosed a little over a year ago. Within six days of gluten removal, I lfelt quite literally as if I'd emerged from a dense and bleak fog....it was incredible. I maintained this surge of energy for several weeks or months - can't remember now. I was severely malnourished at time of dx - had no energy at all and was sleeping at least 14 to 16 hours every day. I remember in the beginning having some ups and downs - - but was also going through a terrible breakup.

Over the summer I got a little sloppy with the eating, and fell into a deep pit. It lasted a couple of months but felt like an eternity. I had cut back on my antidepressant, then resumed taking them. I'm on a maintenance dose now.

For the most part, I've never felt better. But, there are life situations and things I grieve that I never had because of life being so up and down for me for so many years - - lack of stability in oneself makes many things very tough, as you probably know. So, I do feel better than ever, have great mental clarity and energy; I think the times when I become low have to do with life issues and not so much chemical imbalances. Unless, of course, I ingest gluten - - and then I plummet quickly for a day or two.

I do just want to warn you that there may be ups and downs while your body adjusts. Also, it helps to eat little to no processed foods. I really don't ingest chemicals of any kinds, artificial or processed anything.....that has made such a huge difference.

Yes, wheat is EVIL. :angry: I am angry that I lost so many years of my life to the ups and downs, the exhaustion of it all.....

Enjoy your gluten-free life. :)
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#9 cyberprof

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Posted 01 March 2007 - 10:39 PM

This is just unbelievable, to find all this information. I just want to thank everyone so much, for the info, and links you posted. I have just been reading and reading and reading, taking it all it.

It just makes you want to cry. For what everyone had to go through unnecessarily, just because of ‘gluten’. If only everyone would be aware of gluten intolerance and Celiac Disease. It causes so many illnesses.

I had depression mostly all my life, it was very bad. Such black, darkness within my heart. And to only be gluten-free for 28 days, and have no depression at all anymore. And the brain fog, gone. And having such clear thinking now. And the ‘happiness’.

It is just all unbelievable and sort of hard to take all in. The change that happens to you. It’s like going back to a time that once you knew of some happiness, some clear headedness, and to be at that place again. It’s almost like a miracle, feels like a miracle took place.

It’s unbelievable, you want to tell EVERYONE about this. I think the whole world suffers from eating grain (gluten). I don’t believe grain was meant for human consumption, I really don’t. I think it was only meant for maybe certain animals to digest. Not for humans. The damage it causes to us, the neurological damage, there is no way grain could have ever been meant, for us humans to eat it.

Just thanks again for your posts. You have all helped me so much. I am still just overcome with finding out about gluten intolerance and celiac. It is unbelievable….

To think how much we have all suffered. Just because of ‘grain’. And how we feel so great, off it. Unbelievable.

I was told I had a learning disability when I was a young child, and only 28 days off gluten, I feel I don’t even have that anymore either. Unbelievable…. I feel like a kid again. Like I’m becoming a kid again, with this clear thinking. My life has changed, so drastically, in such a short period of time, all because I don’t eat grain (gluten) anymore.

Thank you all so much, for your posts. I greatly appreciate it.

All the best to all of you. And good health to you all.

Take care,
Denise.


I, too, am recently diagnosed (20 days) and feel like a new person. I have always had low-level depression and even though I was functional, it has affected me greatly. After 48 hours without gluten, I felt like I was coming out of the dark. Even though I only had symptoms for 2 years, I agree that I could have benefited from a gluten-free diet for at least the past 25. At 45, I wish I had tried this sooner.

Best to you all. This is good info
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Diagnosed by biopsy 2/12/07. Negative blood tests. Gluten-free (except for accidents) since 2/15/07. DQ2.5 (HLA DQA1*05:DQB1*0201)

Son, age 18, previously delayed growth 3rd percentile weight, 25th percentile height (5'3" at age 15). Negative blood work. Endoscopy declined. Enterolab positive 3/12/08. Gene results: HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201 HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0503 Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,1(Subtype 2,5) Went gluten-free, casein-free 3/15/08. Now 6'2" (Over six feet!) and doing great.

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Posted 02 March 2007 - 01:20 AM

My father was diagnosed as bipolar. I know I got celiac from my mother, but as a child it was my father who had the exact same symptoms as I do. So, I don't know how improbable this is, but I think my father may have celiac as well. His mother also had stomach cancer and was institutionalized so who knows if it runs in both sides of my family.

He was also very abusive so I haven't talked to him in years and did my best to make it so he couldn't find me, so I couldn't warn him about celiac if I tried. It would be strange if all of his mental problems were due to celiac; my childhood would certainly have been different.

I also get anxiety when I'm glutened. I realize that isn't as severe, but it is definitely a psychological symptom that comes from gluten. I'm not anxious at all when I'm not glutened. Sometimes it gets so bad that I feel paranoid. I have a prescription for xanax which makes me feel much better but I only need it the first couple days after being glutened.
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#11 DeniseJarvis

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Posted 02 March 2007 - 04:57 PM

Thank you so much for all your posts. I really appreciate it.

My mother was diagnosed as bipolar about 50 years ago. Me being a little girl having to grow up in that, was really hard. She was more schizophrenic/bipolar. I was told I had a learning disability as a child. When I became 12, I had my first depression. I wrote a suicide note, and I didn’t want to live anymore. It was such a dark, black, horrible depression that just came over me. Almost for no reason at all. But, I didn’t go through with trying to kill myself, for some reason the depression went away. But then it returned at 17 years of age, and stayed. I am 44 now.

It’s just like this awful black feeling inside, that comes over you. It is just unbelievable to me, that if I just don’t eat gluten, I won’t get that horrible black, dark depression. Right now, being gluten free for 29 days, I have no depression whatsoever. I actually feel so clear headed, and ‘happy’. It’s unbelievable, is all I can say. I feel like when I was a kid again, when my thinking was clear, and I knew what happiness felt like.

I got into health foods at age 17, when I was diagnosed as hypoglycemic. I had very severe dark depression. But I didn’t believe in drugs, so I never took any. My mother sent me to a psychiatrist, he prescribed some drugs for me and told me to come back to see how I was doing. I never went back, and I never took the drugs.

I decided to follow Dr. Paavo Airola’s teachings of a diet of whole grains and beans and no processed foods, no sugar, no white flour, etc. His book was called “hypoglycemia, a better approach.” Now, I see that diet was completely wrong with the grains. I don’t believe anymore that grains was intended for human consumption. To see how so many people react so terribly from the gluten in grains. Humans should never eat grains.

Thank you all again, for all your posts. Thank you so much. I never would have believed, in a million years, that something like grain could cause so much neurological disorders in humans. I never would have thought it. I use to believe so strongly, that a diet with whole grains was so healthy and good for you. Now I believe differently, of course.

All the best to all of you. Continued health to you all!

Take care,
Denise.
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From the book: “Grain Damage, rethinking the High Starch Diet. The grain-free diet is not radical. It is ultraconservative.” - by Dr. Douglas Graham:

(I quote)

If we were all crazy, who could tell?

A Little Crazy?

Gluten, a protein found in many grain products, has been named as a causative factor in several psychoses and neurological disorders. It has been proven to chemically contain fifteen different opioid sequences, or morphine-like molecules. Opioids that come from outside the body are called “exorphins.” Exorphins are labelled by scientists as addictive and neurotoxic. They have psychoactive properties and cause related behavioral problems such as addictive eating patterns. Since the mid 1960s, scientist have repeatedly linked gluten consumption to learning disorders and schizophrenia.

Physical effects of opioid consumption include nausea, sedation, truncal rigidity, euphoria, dysphoria, and miosis (pupillary contraction). Opioids are known to interfere with our neurotransmitter chemistry, cause various types of epilepsy, and result in digestive disturbances such as constipation, urinary retention, biliary spasm, reduced production of ADH (an antidiuretic hormone that results in reduced urine production), slowed gastric emptying, and slowed digestion.

Could we all have gone a little crazy?


#12 boroboy77

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Posted 11 March 2007 - 07:45 PM

I used to wonder about the possibility of coeliac disease being related to autism and/or Asperger's, and then when I learned about bipolar disorder I came up with a triangle which linked all 3. amateur mumbo-jumbo but maybe someone will find it interesting...
from what I gather Asperger's and bipolar have been found to be comorbid, and it seems coeliac disease and bipolar could also be linked. so is it reasonable to say then that coeliac disease could be linked to autism and/or Asperger's by way of this triangle?
just a thought
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#13 jacqui

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Posted 25 March 2007 - 03:59 PM

Bipolar and Celiac Disease

Does anyone know of a correlation of Bipolar Disorder and Celiac? Does anyone know of any information of people diagnosed as bipolar, but really having Celiac disease, and no longer needing their medication for bipolar disorder any longer?

Thanks.

Denise.


I don't have an answer, but I have read that a gluten-free diet is very helpful in psych diagnoses, autism and MS. I mean look at some of us on this forum who have gone through serious mood swings, temper tantrums, anger, depression...all related to gluten sensitivity/intolerance or celiac disease. Dr. H worte an article about celiac disease being brain only symptoms and no GI symptoms. Of course, I had to have both and my neuro symptoms do not want to go away.
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IBS 1994
Endometriosis
Hashimoto's auto immune disease
Diverticulosis
Celiac disease April 2006 - neuro symptoms I am assuming from celiac disease
HLA DQ 2 (celiac disease) and HLA DQ 6 (GS) either way my parents made sure I had something!
Insomnia
Hyperflexibility

Daughter 6 y/o (5 at diagnosis) celiac disease via labs (all >100) and flattened biopsy. NO symptoms!!

Daughter 8 y/o with BM ="C" since birth and breast fed, osteopenia, SEVERE eczema up to 5 y/o, now on and off (-) via labs and biopsy. HLA DQ 2 and HLA DQ 8! and possibly ADHD.

Son 3 y/o also HLADQ2 AND DQ 8! Negative panel
Husband MEXICAN and he has DQ 8! His family refuses all and anything with celiac disease, same with his PCP!

"What doesn't kill us makes us stronger..." Right? I think that's the saying.


#14 Flor

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Posted 25 March 2007 - 04:18 PM

Hi all,

I just posted with similar questions under the Celiac and Behavior section -- about the links between autism, celiac and other chronic head/gut illnesses that seem to be a combo of genetics triggered by enviromental stressors.

Latest issue of Discover magazine has an interesting piece on autism research that seemed relevant for Celiac as well.

In my case, I can trace latent signs of head/gut problems back into childhood, but it wasn't until having a child and a bunch of specific physical and emotional stressors that followed from that...that I became loud and clearly symptomatic. And for me the anxiety, depression, inflammation, and diarrhea/bloating all started together. They feel like all the same thing and I'm trying to figure out how to address is systematically.

But I've been down two separate roads -- anxiety/depression drugs and diet changes. Neither road has succeeded entirely yet, though small improvements.

I'd love a regular thread to talk about these head/gut connections. Is there one?
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#15 Fiddle-Faddle

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Posted 26 March 2007 - 04:27 AM

I think for many bipolar people, caffeine/coffee may be just as strong a factor as gluten. There are even some studies on this, but since we never hear about them, I guess the coffee industry has as much political clout as the wheat and pharmaceutical industries...

When you think about it, caffeine (in the form of coffee and sodas) is a legal DRUG. It's a central nervous system stimulant, like Ritalin.
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