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Sorry to bring the subject up again about beta blockers but I do want to make a definite point. Everyone, especially us celiacs, should take a HUGE role, as much as humanly possible, in our health care. Many of you have learned, as I have, that we can not completely trust our doctors (they are only human, afterall) and that we SHOULD question their advice and do our own research and at times, yes, even refuse to take the medication they have prescribed (or just given to us for free as samples to try). I know now that I will NEVER take beta blockers because, as I stated earlier, I had already heard negative things about them years ago, and now from Barbara and you, Kevin. Just to ease your mind, Kevin, I will explain that I am already taking medication to lower my blood pressure (the reason I was given the beta blockers) but am experiencing a negative side affect so when I called my doctor she said she had some samples of a beta blocker if I wanted to try them. I did go by and pick them up but had that nagging negative feeling about trying them. Reading those posts did help in making my decision but WAS NOT the sole reason! We celiacs are a pretty experienced and savvy group just because of our variety of medical problems. I would NEVER jeopardize my health by suddenly stopping a medication based on info I read in a post, even by someone who sounds as intelligent as you, Kevin. A lot of good info is coming out of this thread and I hope it continues.


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red345:I have just read an interesting book from the library that may have some bearing on the research you are doing. It is called "Sugars That Heal, The New

healing Science of Glyconutrients" by Emil I. Mondoa, M.D. and Mindy Kitei. It is published in paperback by Ballantine Books. Copyright is 2001. The book listes 8 essential saccharides and the role of each in maintaining health. Chapter 9 is "Addressing Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Fibromyalgia, and Gulf War Syndrome." There is a comprehensive list of the sources he consulted for each chapter. Also there is a list of resources for the glyconutrients listed in the book. Phone numbers, addresses, and email addresses are included. The essential saccharides according to this book are: Mannose, Fucose, Galactose, Glucose, N-acetylglucosamine, N-acetylgalactosamine, N-acetylneuraminic Acid, Xylose. Food sources of each are listed. Part II: Strengthen Your Immune System, Intro., Common Cold and other Viruses; Treating Bacterial , Fungal, and Parasitic Infections; Alleviating Allergies, Asthma, and Other Pulmonary Diseases, Skin disorders; Arthritis, Diabetes, Other Chronic Illnesses, Inhibiting Cancer, Hepatitis, HIV and Opportunistic Infections, The last part deals with age-related subjects. The author does not put this information forward as a cure-all, but just as a possible approach to these problems. Perhaps you are already aware of this book. If so, ignore. Cheers, Ruth


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1) I am not really sure when I became gluten sensitive. But, I have had stomach problems for as long as I can remember. I was once diagnosed with depression. Although, that was in my early teenage years. I have Tourette's Syndrome. I have had persistent respiratory problems though. I got pneumonia at the age of 9. I had strep throat last year REALLY bad. I had bronchitis earlier this year (See #15).

2) I have dabbled in several vitamins, but suspected they made me sick (they are gluten-free though). I take Zyrtec every day. In the past I have taken Paxil, Luvox, Celexa, Ovcon, and Ortho Tricyclen Lo. Those were the only medications I ever took for a good amount of time. I have always used Ibuprofen to relieve menstrual cramps, but have recently suspected it may make me sick. I have taken several antibiotic series though. And.. anti-inflammatory steroids? Is that what they are? I took something when I had strep throat.. which didn't work and had to go in and get the shot in my bum. :) I was actually prescribed painkillers for this case of strep throat. I had prescriptions too when I had my wisdom teeth cut out 3 or 4 years ago.

3) I had a flu shot maybe a year ago. I know it was the first one I'd had in awhile. I also had both series of immunizations for Hepatitis A and B.

4) Well, I first went to my GI in August of last year. But, decided to hold off on his suggestions. I went back in April. During that period was my first year in college.

5) No

6) I usually find I have more severe symptoms during my period. In fact, I went to the gynecologist first to make sure everything was alright before I pursued anything with the GI.

7) No

8) Liver is A-Okay.

9) No

10) No. The test results really speak for themselves.

11) Probably so. I live in Oklahoma. There's wheat all over the place.

12) I've self-diagnosed myself as casein intolerant.

13) No

14) No

15) I'm pretty sure I was exposed to ammonia earlier this year. I was working with some old ammonia-coated drawings for my mom's work. I developed severe respiratory problems. I pretty much had bronchitis for several months. Needless to say, I quit working there. I used an inhaler from January through April. I was diagnosed in June.

16) No

17) No, but my mom has developed sudden autoimmune diseases. She developed a severe anaphalactic (sp?) reaction to NSAI and it almost killed her. It started with a reaction to Valium and ended up getting to the point where she couldn't take even Aleve. She also had antibodies attack her hair follicles. These things have all occurred within the last 4-5 years.

18) No

19) My gums do bleed sometimes when I brush my teeth.

20) No


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Red345: Have run into some more interesting information involving fibromyalgia patients. A Mark Sprague on ( if this doesn't work try groups) recommends a probiotic from a company called Lame Advertisement called Provex. His email is He used this for high cholesterol , but it cured his ibs as well and in his letter he talks about fibromyalgia, also. Cheers! Ruth S.


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    • You are welcome David. They should take 4 to 6 biopsy samples for microscopic examination during the endoscopy.  They then look at those samples for damage characteristic of celiac disease.  The blood tests include DGP IgA and DGP IgG, plus ttg IgA and total IgA.  You only have to be positive on one blood antibody to gliaden to have celiac disease damage. It's good to catch the condition early as it gives you a chance to avoid major damage to your body over the years.  Since celiac disease is an autoimmune condition, we never outgrow it or get to cheat on the diet without consequences.  The immune system is very sensitive and begins an immune attack with even miniscule amounts of gluten exposure.  But the immune system also kills germs and keeps us from dying of many diseases so it's not all bad. There is a Newbie 101 thread stickied in the coping with forum with lots of information.  
    • Splenda was gluten-free back in 2005 when this thread was active and its still gluten-free now!  I like it better than aspartame as aspartame gives me a stomach ache.  But some people are the exact opposite.  
    • Hi. Im 49 male. I was diagnosed with celiac disease last year. In high school, I was diagnosed  with psoriasis (p) and psoriatic arthritis (psa). For 30 years about I took high-dose ibuprofen for the inflammation. The psa got so bad 5 years ago I had to start enbrel. A biologic drug that is an injection. So Ive been very good about eating gluten-free. Ive had 2 glutenings in 9 months. Symptoms were migraines and stomach pain. I was feeling better in a couple days. In September I started getting same symptoms.  After a couple weeks, bad constipation. Same as before celiac disease diagnosis. I was going crazy! I couldnt figure where the gluten was coming from! Then I was reading the forum here, great resource by the way, and I read how some celics are intolerant to rice also. So I stopped my brown rice that I had been eating daily for years. A matter of days all gluten symptoms were gone. The real magic to me is that within a couple weeks all my psa pain was gone. Now its been been a couple months without enbrel or anything! No sign of p or psa. Im never eating a grain again! Am I crazy? Feels to good to be true.
    • Hi, Thanks so much for the thorough reply. I really appreciate it.  Dairy is something I cut out of my diet too as indeed, I reacted to some things too... But dairy isn't as much of a problem as is sugar, in my case... I don't really know for sure if I'm gluten intolerant, but I guess, some of my reactions may have been caused by the sugar that is in products with gluten, I just don't know but just to be sure and because they damage the gut lining I banned gluten from my diet too...  Yeah, I lost a lot of weight quite fast after changing my diet, it seems I really got my metabolism going and I'm sure it's for the better as I was, and am, prediabetic, so I hope my efforts pay off eventually, I'm not interested in having to manage my blood sugar levels. I just know that with the right diet, I can recover. Anything with sugar in it will cause a negative response in my case, so just to be sure, of the foods you named, does anything contain fructose or glucose? What about the sweet potatoes? I normally don't quite tolerate starchy vegetables. Avocados is something worth considering. I had eggs tonight and so far they do not cause any extraordinary reaction.  Gluten free products is something I'd rather not consume though, especially the rice crackers, I feel my body is really craving an all-natural approach. In that respect I really appreciate the paleo diet, unfortunately even that diet sometimes stresses out my gut apparently...  Caffeine is something I don't tolerate either. Sauerkraut I'm pretty sure I won't tolerate, unfortunately, since it's rich in probiotics.  Oh well, as long as I don't starve and start to feel better I'll manage I guess.  Thanks again Ken
    • According to the Splenda company and the ingredients list, as I read it, it IS gluten free.   I find it tastes better than Stevia extract.  Does this seem the same to you?  Do you find it better than aspartame?   Do you know how aspartame reacts to heat?  I have heard about bad proteins forming, but nothing certain.  You are not alone.  I am an A/I with multiple conditions: -Sarcoidosis, Hash, Reynauds, Sjogren's, incurable candida (caught by an 18 hour stay in a hospital).   I can become Celiac or an A/I diabetic on a dime with 9 cents change.  It never ends. Ironically, I am presently NOT a celiac, but I have severe G/I probs and I am trying a few months of Gluten free to see if it helps by repairing possibly damaged entrail linings (i.e. "leaky gut").   So much  of leaky gut info is nonsense from commercial interests,  so we must all be careful!  A lot of sleaze-bag, snake oil jerks want our money!   Being desperate is not a good shopping mind-set. For info, trust only true non-profit orgs such as The Mayo Clinic or Mount Sinai, etc.   Not even Wikipedia is consistent enough to trust (I am a contributor/editor).   Worse, the AMA is only beginning to admit that such a thing as "Leaky Gut" exists.   And it DOES exists, however, what it is and HOW it is, is not known or even generally comprehended.  If you have serious leaky gut, you are in for a bad ride  —Sorry.  However; for me, this is just an expensive shot in the dark, but one must try everything that is reasonable.    I was simply born with a gene pool without a deep end.  My grandmother died from Scleroderma, etc. Side humour: I was once 50 lbs overweight.  It took 11 months, but 2 weeks after loosing 47 lbs, I was diagnosed A/I, and with Hashimoto's!  Worse, this was due to a clerical error.  As I am male and was then of perfect weight, they would never have normally checked my TSH (even though I had the symptoms).    Somehow, the TSH test box was inadvertently marked.  Doctors, geese. If I am lucky, I will soon have an Ileostomy bag (yes, LUCKY).  At first, you tell them to go to heck, but after years of G/I horror you soon realise that it is a small price to pay for a chance at living with some normality.  But, it is not that easy.  Surgeons will not operate for a "bag" (even though it is reversible) as they are under great malpractice fright and want tests that I cannot , at this late point,  perform! (Catch-22) Again, remember; you are not alone.  I am grateful that I was allowed to live 36 years before I experienced significant symptoms.  However, the U.S.A. medical industry is rubbish and becoming worse by the minute. I have been MISDIAGNOSED 4 times over an 12 year period.  Plus, I have had 5 radiology tests that were wrongly diagnosed by the technician.  Remember that your specialist doctor does NOT look at your images, but relies strictly on the text of the report written by a radiologist whom is NOT an M.D. or Internist!  This should never be allowed to happen. In most other countries, the doctor MUST examine the images.   Make sure you have a doctor who WILL examine the images BEFORE he reads the report.  Be careful out there.  G-d's speed to all of you.  
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