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Celiac Disease And Other Food Intolerances


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#1 Guest_Eagle_*

 
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Posted 05 March 2007 - 08:53 PM

Hello, I was found to be Celiac through the Enterolab testing. It didn't show up in the celiac blood panel. Other Enterolab results showed casein intolerance. I just got back the egg, yeast and soy and it showed mild reaction to egg and a high reaction to soy. I just don't know what to think right now as it seems there are so many foods I will have to take out of my diet. Could there possibly be a mistake? Once one stops eaten gluten is it possible the other food intolerances might go away?
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#2 Judyin Philly

 
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Posted 05 March 2007 - 10:06 PM

HI
ACTUALLY I THINK THAT YOU'RE LUCKY TO HAVE FOUND THIS OUT ALL AT ONCE..AS I THINK YOU'LL HEAL FASTER.
I WISH I HAD CUT DAIRY, SOY, CASEIN ALONG WITH GLUTEN WHEN I FIRST STARTED.
TESTED WITH THE LAB AFTER 20 MONTHS gluten-free AND THESE SHOWED UP.
GOOD LUCK AND KEEP ASKING QUESTIONS AND WE'LL HELP ALL WE CAN
JUDY
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Judy in Southern CA

#3 hathor

 
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Posted 06 March 2007 - 02:25 PM

I think Enterolab only tells you if you are gluten intolerant. Did they do the gene testing as well, find it positive, and say you are celiac?

I had positive results to everything (I see you don't mention yeast -- I'm jealous :lol: )

I emailed Enterolab and asked what the margin of error was, since the yeast score was so low. (The egg one was low too. But that's because I've tried to avoid eggs for years since they often caused gastric distress.) I didn't get an answer to that one.

The answer they gave me would indicate that the other intolerances are permanent. If you don't eat the foods the antibodies go down. But if you start eating them again, they go up. I've heard people say that after 6 months or a year they have been able to eat things they couldn't tolerate before. But I don't remember anyone saying this who had had the Enterolab testing.

The only research I've found relates to yeast. It found that some celiacs stopped creating the antiyeast antibodies after a time on a gluten-free diet. The abstract didn't mention them avoiding yeast.

I'm planning on staying away from everything long enough to cure the malabsorption and for the antibodies to clear out of my system. I might then try to introduce back the yeast and then the soy. Cutting out the soy is difficult since I'm vegetarian. Eating at home isn't that big a problem, but lacking soy cuts out a lot of what I can eat in a restaurant. So many Asian dishes, for instance, have soy sauce in them. A couple times restaurants have made adjustments for me, but the results have been rather tasteless.

I don't know I'm giving you any answers. Just trying to tell you that you are not alone. For what that's worth :lol:

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McDougall diet (low fat vegan) since 6/00
Gluten free since 1/6/07
Soy free and completely casein and egg free since 2/15/07
Yeast free, on and off, since 3/1/07 -- I can't notice any difference one way or the other

Enterolab results -- 2/15/07
Fecal Antigliladin IgA 140 (Normal Range <10 units)
Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 50 (Normal Range <10 units)
Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 517 (Normal Range <300 units)
Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 127 (Normal Range <10 units)
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0501
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 06xx
Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (subtype 5,6)
Fecal anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA antibody 11 (Normal range <10 units)
Fecal Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (dietary yeast) IgA 11 (Normal range <10 units)
Fecal Anti-Soy IgA 119 (Normal Range < 10 units)

#4 Jestgar

 
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Posted 06 March 2007 - 03:31 PM

You might want to cut out both egg and soy for a while. Not with the paranoia required for gluten, but be very careful. After you've been gluten-free for a while start adding back small amounts of egg. If you feel bad when you eat it, then you can't eat it. Some people find they can tolerate a little, or just whites, or just yolks.

Then do the same with soy. My opinion is: if you are producing antibodies, but it doesn't make you feel bad, then limit that particular food, but don't stress about it.
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#5 CarlaB

 
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Posted 06 March 2007 - 03:35 PM

You might want to cut out both egg and soy for a while. Not with the paranoia required for gluten, but be very careful. After you've been gluten-free for a while start adding back small amounts of egg. If you feel bad when you eat it, then you can't eat it. Some people find they can tolerate a little, or just whites, or just yolks.

Then do the same with soy. My opinion is: if you are producing antibodies, but it doesn't make you feel bad, then limit that particular food, but don't stress about it.


I agree with this. Cut it out entirely in the beginning, then challenge it after a few months to see if you react. I did this with dairy, my score was 30, and I have no problem whatsoever with dairy. It doesn't bother me at all. I can't really explain why my score was so high ... but there is no test that is perfect.

I had a negative celiac blood test, negative biopsy and positive Enterolab. I am very sensitive to gluten and need to avoid it as seriously as a celiac.
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gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06




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