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Has Anyone Ever Heard This Before?


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#1 Killarney

 
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Posted 19 September 2004 - 11:20 AM

I had a positive blood test for the antibodies a couple weeks ago. I haven't had my biopsy yet.

Anyhow, my father was visiting his gastro (for a regular colonoscopy) and he brought up that his grown daughter (me) might have Celiac's. The doctor asked how he knows and he mentions that I had a positive blood test. The doctor asked if I had the biopsy done and my father said not yet. Then the doctor said something strange.

He said, "your wife (my mother) is from Ireland, right?" My father said yes and the doctor said, well make sure your daughter gets that biopsy because 1 in 5 people of Irish descent will have a fake positive blood test for Celiac's.

Has anyone heard that before?

I was kind of surprised at that.

I would be happy to find that it was a false positive and that I don't have Celiac's. But, on the other hand, then why I'm having these problems (diahrea, pain, conspitation, etc) would still be a mystery then.
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#2 3boyzmom

 
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Posted 19 September 2004 - 02:14 PM

Although I have not heard of that correaltion, I would like to comment on it.

I believe that there is a whole group of people that the medical community is missing the boat on. It is the group that tests positive for a gluten intolerance (presence of 'tons' of anti-bodies to gliadin) but have not yet developed the damage in the small intestines to give a diagnosis of Celiac's disease. These poor folks would be what he describes as the 'false positives.' They have not yet or may never sustain damage to the villi in their small intestines, but could benefit from a gluten-free diet, helping them avoid a whole host of other auto immune disorders.

I believe that gluten intolerance can lead to Celiac's disease 'as well as' many other auto immune disorders afflicting people today. Most of the medical community fails to recognize this and therefore does not encourage a gluten-free diet for anyone other than "gold standard" proven Celiacs.

If your biopsy is inconclusive or negative, I would recommend a trial on a gluten-free diet to see if it helps.Your response to a gluten-free diet along with your bloodwork results, would be sufficient to accept a gluten intolerant/sensitive diagnosis.

These are only my opinions on the matter...

I am NOT a doctor, nor do I play one on t.v.! :) I am just a mother of a gluten intolerant child who has read and chatted with others in the same boat. Please feel free to challenge me or point me towards any research and information, I'm always searching!

Priscilla
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#3 tarnalberry

 
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Posted 19 September 2004 - 06:01 PM

I quite agree. Sure... if you go by the textbook definition of not being celiac until your villi are flat, then you could have a positive blood test without the textbook celiac diagnosis - doesn't mean that you should still eat gluten though.
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Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"
Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy
G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004
Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me
Bellevue, WA




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