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Coors Light


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11 replies to this topic

#1

 
dairy queen

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 07:30 AM

I was talking to someone over the weekend who's husband has celiac disease. She told me a few odd things. She said that he drinks coors light and eats quaker oats, safely.
Has anyone else heard of or done this???
I was a little confused, but just let her talk! :blink:
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#2 confused

 
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    Just cause i cant have gluten doesnt mean im dying

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 07:34 AM

I was talking to someone over the weekend who's husband has celiac disease. She told me a few odd things. She said that he drinks coors light and eats quaker oats, safely.
Has anyone else heard of or done this???
I was a little confused, but just let her talk! :blink:


I have never heard coors light was gluten free, if it was tho, i would be so happy. That is what i have been drinking for years. Even tho i am happy with the redbridge, just wish it was cheaper lol

paula
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#3

 
Lisa

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 07:48 AM

Coors Lite beer and eating commonly found oat meal is VERY unsafe for celiacs.

The beer contains malt and the oatmeal is most likely cross contaminated.
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#4

 
happygirl

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 08:04 AM

Dairy queen,

I second what MG noted. Both are very unsafe for Celiacs. Not having an overt reaction does not mean that the autoimmune reaction is not occuring.

Something to think about: If normal beers were gluten free, why would Anheuiser Busch, a company that makes many normal beers, feel the need to make a separate gluten free beer? :) If they know regular beer isn't gluten free, then it really means it isn't safe for us!

Laura
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#5

 
larry mac

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 04:34 PM

I was talking to someone over the weekend who's husband has celiac disease. She told me a few odd things. She said that he drinks coors light and eats quaker oats, safely....


dq,

The oats only has the potential (or likelyhood) of cross-contamination. The beer is a gluten product, big difference.

best regards, lm
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#6

 
CarlaB

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 05:00 PM

dq,

The oats only has the potential (or likelyhood) of cross-contamination. The beer is a gluten product, big difference.

best regards, lm



This is from the Quaker Oats website.

Because oats are grown, stored, transported in bulk, they may contain trace amounts of wheat, rye and barley. USDA grain standards allow a certain percentage of other grains to be present in the oats. Therefore, gluten may be found in oats, even if very small amounts of these other grains are present.

So, Quaker even admits there can be a percentage of other grains present. This is more contamination than an allergen statement that says it was produced in a facility that also processes wheat!
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#7

 
Judygirl05

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Posted 26 March 2015 - 02:54 PM

Hi, Just wanted to inform this post that Coors Light NOW has their own Gluten Free beer.  They just launched their first GL beer which is called "Coors Peak".  It was released in Jan. 2015 in the Seattle and Portland OR area only to test the market with it.  It is being manufactured at it's own plant here in Oregon to assure against cross contamination.   Im pretty excited about it myself and am looking forward to trying it out.


Edited by Judygirl05, 26 March 2015 - 02:59 PM.

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#8

 
kareng

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Posted 26 March 2015 - 02:55 PM

Hi, Just wanted to inform this post that Coors Light is NOW Gluten Free.  They just launched their first GL beer which is called "Coors Peak".  It was released in Jan. 2015 in the Seattle and Portland OR area only to test the market with it.  Im pretty excited about it myself and am looking forward to trying it out.


Coors light is still not gluten free. They have a new beer that is coming out that is gluten free.
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#9

 
Judygirl05

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Posted 26 March 2015 - 03:00 PM

Coors light is still not gluten free. They have a new beer that is coming out that is gluten free.

Yes that is what I was saying.  I edited my post to clarify that better.  :)


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#10

 
ch88

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Posted 24 August 2015 - 05:02 PM

I have heard that the fermentation process breaks down the gluten in some types of beer. Some common beers test out at less that 5 parts per million. I only drink gluten removed beers right now but I am considering trying a few others. You can google the gluten content of different beers. I am not sure how safe or unsafe these beers are for people with Celiac disease. 


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#11

 
LauraTX

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Posted 24 August 2015 - 08:54 PM

I have heard that the fermentation process breaks down the gluten in some types of beer. Some common beers test out at less that 5 parts per million. I only drink gluten removed beers right now but I am considering trying a few others. You can google the gluten content of different beers. I am not sure how safe or unsafe these beers are for people with Celiac disease. 

 

Welcome to the board!  :)   Do note that the original post here is 8 years old and product info can change over time.  

 

While the fermentation may partially modify some things in the beer, they still contain gluten.  I recommend not drinking any beer that does not at least go through a gluten removal process, and it is my opinion that gluten-removed beers are not okay to market to Celiacs because the gluten content cannot be accurately measured. Do a search on the main page of the forum for "omission" for lots of great discussions on this.  While I respect your decision on drinking gluten removed beers, I highly recommend against drinking anything that does not go through that process, because having a beer is not as important as having good health.  Cheers :)


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#12

 
ch88

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Posted 25 August 2015 - 12:38 PM

Thanks. Yeah I noticed the original post was old but there are some new ones. 

 

I know with omission beer some people have a strong reaction. Other people seem to tolerate it without any noticeable problems. I react strongly to gluten but can drink gluten removed beer without any problems. It took me a while to get comfortable with the idea but I am fine with it now. I can see why some people would want to play it safe and not consume anything made from wheat or barley.

 

The 'removal' process merely breaks the gluten proteins down in to smaller pieces. These smaller pieces are technically not gluten.  Some other regular beers have a lower gluten content than gluten removed beer. I think it depends on the individuals choice and on what they react to. Certainly not all people with Celiac disease are the same. 


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