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Trigger Point Injection Therapy
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Hello all. I did a search and see that we have a few people who have tried trigger point injection therapy. My doctors what to evaluate me to see if this would help my chronically sore/tight neck and shoulder muscles.

The clinic that I go to is heavy into gluten-free, so I know that the injections will not contain it, and the ingredients that I know for sure are "sugar water" (whatever that means, lol) and possibly lidocaine and I'm fairly positive they do not contain steroids of any kind.

For those who have had it, did the therapy reduce your stiffness and/or pain?

How long did you do the injections?

How long did the effects last?

In the end was it worth it and did it help overall?

I'm expecting some pain with the injections themselves, but was it excruiating, lol?

[Edited to add: I should also mention that I'm pretty sure the stiff neck/soreness is being caused by something else...not sure what...maybe celiac, maybe mercury toxicity, maybe candida, maybe something else, who knows.]

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i haven't had it done, but just today i have been reading a book about fibromyalgia and myofacial pain and they talk alot about trigger points and trigger point injections.

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I had an injection in my shoulder about 3 months ago. The injection itself didn't really hurt to bad, it was the pain right after that bothered me. I had great relief from the injection and I can tell that I am due for another!

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I had an injection in my shoulder about 3 months ago. The injection itself didn't really hurt to bad, it was the pain right after that bothered me. I had great relief from the injection and I can tell that I am due for another!

Oh good!!! That is encouraging!!! Thanks!

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I had them done in my neck and shoulders back in December...definitely worked! It doesn't hurt too much...more like a sting. Hope they help you sweetie!

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I had this done for lower back and knee pain.Its called Prolotherapy here. Have you tried searching on that ? I was due to have a 2nd knee op due to the knee pain when someone told me about this. It has been GREAT! I had 8 sessions altogether. The Dr said I was about 5 years away from needing back surgery. He injected about 20 places each visit, and I haven't been back for 3 years although he did say I may need to see him occasionally - as mine was so bad. I haven't though. VERY happy with it. And I never had that knee op! There was pain after the jabs and a 'tight' feeling in the back, and that was all.

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I had them done in my neck and shoulders back in December...definitely worked! It doesn't hurt too much...more like a sting. Hope they help you sweetie!

Thanks Bev!!!! It was one of your posts that I found when I searched here, so I'm glad you saw this.

I had this done for lower back and knee pain.Its called Prolotherapy here. Have you tried searching on that ? I was due to have a 2nd knee op due to the knee pain when someone told me about this. It has been GREAT! I had 8 sessions altogether. The Dr said I was about 5 years away from needing back surgery. He injected about 20 places each visit, and I haven't been back for 3 years although he did say I may need to see him occasionally - as mine was so bad. I haven't though. VERY happy with it. And I never had that knee op! There was pain after the jabs and a 'tight' feeling in the back, and that was all.

EXCELLENT!!!! Yay. This all makes me feel much better about the whole thing. I get "evaluated" today, so I'll know more about the hows/whats for my particular case.

Thanks everyone!

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I forgot to say when I had mine I wasn't allowed to take any anti inflammatory pain meds like aspirin or arthritis drugs. Only paracetamol. And not allowed to lift heavy objects or run for 3 months after the last session of needles - to give ligaments time to heal. I also was given large dose VitC and Glucosamine meds.

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I forgot to say when I had mine I wasn't allowed to take any anti inflammatory pain meds like aspirin or arthritis drugs. Only paracetamol. And not allowed to lift heavy objects or run for 3 months after the last session of needles - to give ligaments time to heal. I also was given large dose VitC and Glucosamine meds.

Thanks for the info above, I did a search on prolotherapy and it turns out that is what she had in mind for me. I actually had my first set of injections today as well. She concentrated on the area at the base of my skull and my neck. I also got a couple in my shoulder. The shots themselves weren't painful although I could feel her moving the needle around in some of the most tender spots. However, I'm REALLY sore now, lol. She also told me no anti-inflamatories, and no ice. I've got heat on now, which is helping a bit. She gave me a prescription for vicodin and said I could take Tylenol if I wanted, but I'm going to try to go without unless I think I won't sleep (didn't even fill the precription, lol).

Hum, I asked specifically about working out and she said yes I could, and didn't say anything about not lifting heavy objects...I'll double check next time. I've also got a do's/don't list which I have to go read, lol.

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I was given a few gentle stretching exercises but told no weights or impact training - like jogging or running. Walking when you could was OK.I lifted a bucket of water one day and suffered for it. How did you find the needles ? I hated it - and had so many near my spine or what felt like that to me. And the sore spots can be felt. Did you have a local anaethetic in each spot first, then the sugar solution ?

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Dear Donna,

I'd have to ask my wife for all the specific details you requested, but she has had fibromyalgia for at least eight years or so (no celiac though, that's me). She found a doctor that has a fibromyalgia wife and so treats it. Got the lidocaine (not sure what exactly was in there) trigger point shots for a while. They were effective for her shoulder but had less success for her hip, which was really hurting her.

Got a special injection for her hip & back, a Botox trigger point shot. Not covered by insurance. $1000. Yes, that's $1000.00 real US money for one shot. And no, we are not wealthy. Just two working class folks. She claimed it was very effective. I on the other hand was in total shock, even though it was her yearly bonus money. Of course, it's impossible for me to comprehend her pain. I make a big deal out of any pain. Kind of a big baby I'll have to say truthfully.

That's all I know. best regards, lm

p.s., She was very satisfied, said it lasted over five years!

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I think mine cost about A$2000 altogether but it was worth every cent and more. I avoided TWO serious operations and have no pain even 3 years later. That is priceless.

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I was given a few gentle stretching exercises but told no weights or impact training - like jogging or running. Walking when you could was OK.I lifted a bucket of water one day and suffered for it. How did you find the needles ? I hated it - and had so many near my spine or what felt like that to me. And the sore spots can be felt. Did you have a local anaethetic in each spot first, then the sugar solution ?

I'll definitely have to double check with her about the weights I guess. I know they had me do my normal physical therapy exercises afterwards, and that included some weights. The needles weren't bad. I honestly didn't feel most of them until she started moving the needles around whilst in there. (sorry for any who read this who are squeamish!) I had a lot at the base of my skull...felt those more and also heard crackling noises, lol. She said that was because it was close to my ear. She used two things...a local anesthetic and an antisceptic. The soreness around my skull is nearly gone today, but the spot in my shoulder and arm are pretty sore still. I concentrated the heat on my neck last night and I think that's why.

Dear Donna,

I'd have to ask my wife for all the specific details you requested, but she has had fibromyalgia for at least eight years or so (no celiac though, that's me). She found a doctor that has a fibromyalgia wife and so treats it. Got the lidocaine (not sure what exactly was in there) trigger point shots for a while. They were effective for her shoulder but had less success for her hip, which was really hurting her.

Got a special injection for her hip & back, a Botox trigger point shot. Not covered by insurance. $1000. Yes, that's $1000.00 real US money for one shot. And no, we are not wealthy. Just two working class folks. She claimed it was very effective. I on the other hand was in total shock, even though it was her yearly bonus money. Of course, it's impossible for me to comprehend her pain. I make a big deal out of any pain. Kind of a big baby I'll have to say truthfully.

That's all I know. best regards, lm

p.s., She was very satisfied, said it lasted over five years!

Thanks Larry Mac! I've heard of the botox injections. I have a good friend with fibromyalgia who has had them. Unfortunately it didn't help her in the long run, but I do think it lessened the pain for a while.

I have a pretty high tolerance for pain, but there's something about needles...I had to lay down yesterday after about 4 shots, lol. After laying down I was fine and proceded to get a bunch more, but probably would have passed out had I NOT layed down at that point. :lol:

I think mine cost about A$2000 altogether but it was worth every cent and more. I avoided TWO serious operations and have no pain even 3 years later. That is priceless.

Yikes. I'm hoping it doesn't cost that much. All I had to pay yesterday was my co-pay, so I'm hoping that's it. I agree that it is priceless...I don't think mine would have come to any kind of surgery, but my doctor feels that the pain issue is one reason why my adrenals aren't coming back the way they should...he's just trying to take as many stressors off as possible. To me, having energy again to do stuff would be sweet. :)

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.....

I've heard of the botox injections. I have a good friend with fibromyalgia who has had them. Unfortunately it didn't help her in the long run, but I do think it lessened the pain for a while.

.....

Her doctor, who is a fibromyalgia specialist, explained it to us like this (actually as best I can remember & very simply in my words).

You hurt and so automatically limit your physical activity and range of motion. This actually worsens the situation. It's a catch 22. By deadening the affected muscle area, you should feel less pain, which will allow you to resume normal activities, and at the same time work those muscles out (exercise, ride a bike, etc.). If you don't follow up with the physical therapy part (the exercising) there will be no lasting benefits. The shots will simply be temporary relief.

As for my wife, well simply put she's not an exerciser. Nuff said about that.

best regards, lm

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What type of doctor do you see for these injections? Are they used for tension headaches?

Thanks

Kathy

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As for my wife, well simply put she's not an exerciser. Nuff said about that.

Yep, my friend too. :lol: Does care about diet either! :lol:

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What type of doctor do you see for these injections? Are they used for tension headaches?

Thanks

Kathy

In my case it is an internist who has been trained in the technique. I'm not sure if it helps tension headaches specifically, but if it is muscle tension that causes the headaches...maybe. I did a little research on the Internet and from what I have read, you'd want someone who has received some good training in this--that can make the difference in whether you'd get good relief or not.

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Yikes. I'm hoping it doesn't cost that much. All I had to pay yesterday was my co-pay, so I'm hoping that's it. I agree that it is priceless...

I had a LOT of them. About 40 injections per session and 8 sessions. All my lower back, and down the leg muscle to my knees. The knee pain was cos the muscle/ligament was slack and the knee was rotating too much. So happy to have saved that 2nd surgery as the first op gave me a DVT and almost took my life. For me - anything is better than surgery! .

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I had a LOT of them. About 40 injections per session and 8 sessions. All my lower back, and down the leg muscle to my knees. The knee pain was cos the muscle/ligament was slack and the knee was rotating too much. So happy to have saved that 2nd surgery as the first op gave me a DVT and almost took my life. For me - anything is better than surgery! .

I agree, avoiding surgery is wonderful! I think I only had around 8-15 injections, with the most being around the base of my skull, then a couple in the neck and a couple in the shoulder and a couple more at the top of the forearm. She decided to do only one side and to limited the amount she did the first time so I could see how everything affected me, and so that I had one side to sleep on, lol.

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