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Soy - Can Heal?


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#1 Blue-Skye

 
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Posted 10 March 2007 - 02:27 PM

Good day I have a general question about Soy - Our son tested as high allergy to Soy but we see no visible signs of it ourselves.

In fact he insists he is not allergic to gluten or soy because he does not have full blown anaphylactic reactions like his father does to peanuts and fish.

I tried to ask about leaky gut as the cause but they said no - maybe they do not believe in it? That he will never heal and will always be reactive to soy.

Since we do not see any outward signs of allergy do we need to avoid it 100% and be paranoid about it or just an awareness of it and do our best to avoid it. It is in basically everything and we have cleaned out the fridge and cupboards due to the soy and gluten. Or could it be doing inner damage such as cognitive / or internal organ damage, setting the stage for cancer, etc?

The testing was done through enterolabs - should we take him to a traditional allergists - which we've done in the past - about 8 years ago - just to verify the soy allergy? We have no insurance to speak of so all this is being paid for by ourselves.

Does anyone have any links to reaseach about soy damage if one ingests it while "allergic"?

We have cut out all grains, sugar, soy, - we are doing the Specific Carbohydrate Diet to heal but would like to know there is an end in sight if possible - or if we need to face reality and know this is for life.

Thanks for all your help, I have another post with questions in the pre test forum.
Blue-Skye
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#2 AndreaB

 
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Posted 10 March 2007 - 02:41 PM

Blue-Skye,

The enterolab tests don't test for immediate reaction allergies. As far as I know their test is similar to delayed reaction allergies (or intolerances).

The gluten and soy could cause intestinal damage, joint pain. Don't remember if soy can cause neurological problems or not.

I've posted a couple different articles on soy in this category. I'll see if I can find them and post the links.

Ok here is a link....

http://www.glutenfre...showtopic=22617
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Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.


#3 Juliebove

 
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Posted 10 March 2007 - 05:56 PM

My daughter is allergic to soy. She does not have the life threatening kind of allergy and in her case the reaction will vary. She once got stomach pains while eating soy containing crackers. But usually her symptoms are skin rashes and nosebleeds. Took me a while to figure out that the nosebleeds were related to soy and peanuts. She usually has a bleed the day after eating the offending food. Also her behavior gets bad if she eats something she is allergic to. She gets really cranky and can't pay attention.
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#4 Nantzie

 
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Posted 10 March 2007 - 08:44 PM

What I would do is to make a deal with him to completely cut out soy for a set period of time. A month or two? Then reintroduce it and see what happens.

I'm not up on the details of soy intolerance, but if it's anything like gluten intolerance, he'll feel so great off soy and so awful on it that it will be his choice to stay off of it and you won't have to police it.

I only did the genetic test through Enterolab (we couldn't afford the rest at the time). I did also notice a complete soy intolerance just a few weeks after going gluten-free. I had the soy intolerance for about two months and then it went away. Other food intolerances are common with celiac and gluten intolerance, some of which are permanent and others that are temporary.

I hope he feels better.

Nancy
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The person who says it cannot be done should not interrupt the person who is doing it.
~Chinese Proverb

#5 Blue-Skye

 
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Posted 11 March 2007 - 08:03 AM

OK my wheels are turning - he will be 13 on June 23rd. That would be about 3 months. I'm thinking maybe we could do a complete avoidance until then and then he could go to his favorite Chinese restaurant to see how he does. He begs for this restaurant. How much soy would we have to put back in - for how many "x" number of days?

I'd hate to put soy back in thinking there was no problem but it took several months to see the problem again - then we'd have to start over trying to get things healed and back to a great position.

We have cut soy and gluten (as well as sugar and processed foods) out of the home 100% - it is not in the home in any form - but he has been allowed teriyaki beef a few times at his favorite Chinese restaurant in the last 9 weeks.

My biggest problem is that I know what healthy eating entails and my thoughts were always that a bit of unhealthy here and there would not kill you - and hubby has anaphylactic reactions to peanuts and fish so I know what that does to a person but this subtle under the surface sensitivity being serious (as in needing to be 100% with zero tollerance for infractions) has been hard to drill into my hard head.

Not eating out has been our biggest struggle - learning curve. When one is tired or out and about it was just easier to eat out - but it seems there is gluten and/or soy in everything - at least at the grocery store all the premade stuff has it. I went to buy beef sausage this week and it had soy, I had to put it back and choose a brand not on sale. Then I realized the spices probably had gluten in it. This can be hard sometimes. Just easier to stick with all fresh foods to be 100% sure?

Blue-Skye
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#6 Nancym

 
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Posted 11 March 2007 - 03:06 PM

Keep in mind that most soy sauce contains soy AND gluten (wheat). So if he's been eating teriakyi beef, I doubt he's been gluten free.
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