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Corned Beef
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Does anyone know if corned beef is safe? It is time for some Irish food and I love Corned beef and cabbage.

Thanks, Debbie

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I don't know why corned beef wouldn't be safe. The ingredients are usually beef and salt. Both of those are completely gluten-free. If the beef is smoked it is still gluten free if the smoke is from wood, which it has been in every case that I have seen. Bon apetit! Cabbage is also gluten-free.

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Yes, I love corn beef mixed with onions and Mayo for sandwiches :P

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If you want a really nice corned beef and cabbage meal, this is one of my specialties. You'll need a big pan- we tend to use a pressure cooker without the lid, or a wok.

Make up some mashed potato. Make it really, really runny. Add one can of corned beef per two people, one can of baked beans and one of diced tomatoes per two people, and as much cabbage, carrot and onion as you think you'll need. Then add more onion.

Add enough water to make it soupy, some mixed herbs, stir it up well and then add about a tablespoon [heaped] of gravy poweder. [i really hope you can get that gluten-free where you are]

Keep stirring. This is really important, because when it burns, it really burns. It should thicken up to the consistency of wet cement, and go a darkish browny-red. When you can stand the spoon up on its own, its boiling thoroughly and all the lumps of corned beef have broken down into a smooth paste, its done.

Don't try and put it on a plate.

This stuff tends to last us a few days at a time.

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If you want a really nice corned beef and cabbage meal, this is one of my specialties. You'll need a big pan- we tend to use a pressure cooker without the lid, or a wok.

Make up some mashed potato. Make it really, really runny. Add one can of corned beef per two people, one can of baked beans and one of diced tomatoes per two people, and as much cabbage, carrot and onion as you think you'll need. Then add more onion.

Add enough water to make it soupy, some mixed herbs, stir it up well and then add about a tablespoon [heaped] of gravy poweder. [i really hope you can get that gluten-free where you are]

Keep stirring. This is really important, because when it burns, it really burns. It should thicken up to the consistency of wet cement, and go a darkish browny-red. When you can stand the spoon up on its own, its boiling thoroughly and all the lumps of corned beef have broken down into a smooth paste, its done.

Don't try and put it on a plate.

This stuff tends to last us a few days at a time.

Now that is an interesting receipe. Do you serve it like soup? Also, I am not sure I have ever seen corned beef in a can in Ohio. I usually buy it as a roast style piece of meat. I love new dishes to make so I am going to look for canned corn beef on my next shopping trip. Thanks again.

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I don't know why corned beef wouldn't be safe. The ingredients are usually beef and salt. Both of those are completely gluten-free. If the beef is smoked it is still gluten free if the smoke is from wood, which it has been in every case that I have seen. Bon apetit! Cabbage is also gluten-free.

The times I have read the package label I have always found my favorite term "natural flavoring" I always get stumped on that terminology. I just dont want to get sick. I am just getting over my Christmas accidental glutening. Don't want to start all over.

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The times I have read the package label I have always found my favorite term "natural flavoring" I always get stumped on that terminology. I just dont want to get sick. I am just getting over my Christmas accidental glutening. Don't want to start all over.

Another solution is to take a beef brisket, which is the same cut of meat, and add your own seasoning and cook it as you would a corned beef. Corned beef is beef brisket that is cured or brined in salt, not smoked. Cloves, bay leaves and peepercorns is what is in the little seasnoing packet you get with the conred beef. It wont be exactly the same, as your meat wont be brined

Another idea is to brine your own brisket, making a turer version of conred beef. You could infact rbine your own brisket.

I ahve included directions from Cookc.com on brining and curing your own croned beef.

It does take a few days, but this way you are guaranteed a safe corned beef.

HOME-CURED CORNED BEEF

7 qts. water

3 c. kosher salt, approx.

1 raw egg in the shell for testing brine

1 (6 to 9 lb.) brisket of beef

3 cloves garlic, peeled

20 cloves

20 peppercorns

1 bay leaf

6 sprigs fresh thyme or 1 tsp. dried

1/2 tbsp. saltpeter, available in drug stores

1. To cure the brisket, you will need a large earthenware, enamel or stainless- steel crock. Do not add the meat to the crock at this time.

2. Pour the water into the crock and add the salt, stirring to dissolve it. Add the egg. The egg is used to test the salt content of the brine. If the egg floats in the solution, it is ready. If it does not float, continue adding salt, a little at a time, stirring to dissolve, until the egg floats. Remove the egg.

3. Add the brisket to the brine. Add the garlic, cloves, peppercorns, bay leaf, thyme and saltpeter. Stir well. Place a clean, heavy weight on the meat to make certain it is covered. Place a lid on the crock and refrigerate for from 8 to 12 days. Turn the brisket occasionally, but keep it weighted down.

4. When ready to cook the corned beef, remove it from the brine and rinse it well. Follow the instructions below for cooking corned beef. Yield: One six to nine pound corned beef.

Hope this is helpful

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Now that is an interesting receipe. Do you serve it like soup? Also, I am not sure I have ever seen corned beef in a can in Ohio. I usually buy it as a roast style piece of meat. I love new dishes to make so I am going to look for canned corn beef on my next shopping trip. Thanks again.

I tend to serve it like soup, although to be honest, you can eat it with a fork! This is one of the meals I grew up on as a kid. Its one to warm you up after a hard day, and it re-heats beautifully. I like to add a lot of red and black pepper to mine, to give it some extra oomph, although it also goes nicely with white pepper and with your average supermarkert cajun spice blend.

I've never seen corned beef except in cans... reigonal differences eh? If you buy it in a lump, you could probably blend it down soft in a food processor, which would probably have the same effect.

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I sent an e-mail to Boyle's Famous Corn Beef Company. They are pretty well known in this area. I'll post if/when I recieve any info from them .

-Jessica :rolleyes:

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Does anyone know if corned beef is safe? It is time for some Irish food and I love Corned beef and cabbage.

Thanks, Debbie

Hi, I found this post when searching on Google and I am erring on the side that it probably DOES contain gluten until I find some concrete proof otherwise. I found out last year when we began the gluten-free/CF diet for our 2 1/2 year old son (with Autism) via several local butchers that most pre=packaged meats are injected with a water and gluten substance. Why, I have no idea. This is why all sliced meats are unsafe to eat for people wishing to avoid Gluten, that is unless you purchase the pre-packaged sliced meats which clearly state on the label "Gluten Free".

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Hi, I found this post when searching on Google and I am erring on the side that it probably DOES contain gluten until I find some concrete proof otherwise. I found out last year when we began the gluten-free/CF diet for our 2 1/2 year old son (with Autism) via several local butchers that most pre=packaged meats are injected with a water and gluten substance. Why, I have no idea. This is why all sliced meats are unsafe to eat for people wishing to avoid Gluten, that is unless you purchase the pre-packaged sliced meats which clearly state on the label "Gluten Free".

While this might be true in some places (although I highly doubt it), it is most certainly not the case in the United States or Canada. Gluten in prepared meat is extremely rare. In the US, if wheat is present, no matter how small the quantity, it must be clearly disclosed on the label.

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I was just on the Johnsonville site, as I wanted to know if their brats (well, not beer brats, obviously! ;) ) were g.f. It looked as if most of their products were gluten-free., with exception of course of beer brats, and sausages containing teriyaki-type stuff, etc.

Not nearly as good as Redhook brats, but hey--at least I'll be able to eat brats again!

It's good to know for sure that corned beef (and most packaged meats) are g.f., as I made killer corned beef and cabbage last month!

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