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Here's A New One For The Books -- Lupin Intolerance


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4 replies to this topic

#1 hathor

 
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Posted 29 March 2007 - 04:44 PM

I've been trying out different gluten-free pastas. A few days ago I tried an imported one that among its ingredients has lupin flour & protein. All I knew before that was the flower by that name that was featured in a Monty Python routine ...

Anyway, I start having symptoms just like I do from soy. I finally made the possible connection and researched lupin allergy, thinking I was being some sort of paranoid nut. It turns out that this is a growing concern in Europe and Australia, where lupin is like the new soy, finding its way into all sorts of things. Maybe we don't see the problem here (yet) because we don't have a bunch of lupin farmers.

Lupin is a legume and those who react to other legumes, including soy and especially peanuts, have a greater likelihood of reacting to it.

The European Union has just added lupin to its list of allergens that must be listed, but this isn't in effect yet. http://tinyurl.com/v4zvw
I guess I'm being trendy and continental :lol:

  • 0
McDougall diet (low fat vegan) since 6/00
Gluten free since 1/6/07
Soy free and completely casein and egg free since 2/15/07
Yeast free, on and off, since 3/1/07 -- I can't notice any difference one way or the other

Enterolab results -- 2/15/07
Fecal Antigliladin IgA 140 (Normal Range <10 units)
Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 50 (Normal Range <10 units)
Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 517 (Normal Range <300 units)
Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 127 (Normal Range <10 units)
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0501
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 06xx
Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (subtype 5,6)
Fecal anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA antibody 11 (Normal range <10 units)
Fecal Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (dietary yeast) IgA 11 (Normal range <10 units)
Fecal Anti-Soy IgA 119 (Normal Range < 10 units)

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#2 hathor

 
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Posted 29 March 2007 - 04:52 PM

A link to the Python routine: http://www.ibras.dk/...episode37.htm#6
  • 0
McDougall diet (low fat vegan) since 6/00
Gluten free since 1/6/07
Soy free and completely casein and egg free since 2/15/07
Yeast free, on and off, since 3/1/07 -- I can't notice any difference one way or the other

Enterolab results -- 2/15/07
Fecal Antigliladin IgA 140 (Normal Range <10 units)
Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 50 (Normal Range <10 units)
Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 517 (Normal Range <300 units)
Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 127 (Normal Range <10 units)
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0501
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 06xx
Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (subtype 5,6)
Fecal anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA antibody 11 (Normal range <10 units)
Fecal Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (dietary yeast) IgA 11 (Normal range <10 units)
Fecal Anti-Soy IgA 119 (Normal Range < 10 units)

#3 AndreaB

 
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Posted 29 March 2007 - 04:56 PM

I wonder how long it will be before it's added to foods over here. <_<
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Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.


#4 tarnalberry

 
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Posted 29 March 2007 - 06:30 PM

There's a genetic tendency - especially in those of Greek, Turkish, and southern Italian decent, to be intolerant to fava beans. It's called favism, and causes red blood cells to pretty much explode when both copies of the genes are had. Turns out it's protective against malaria, especially amongst carriers who - drumroll - eat fava beans. The less than perfect state of the blood is better, genetically, than the effects of malaria, so the trait gets passed on. (I've been reading "Survival of the Sickest"... Interesting book.) Anyway, it was a bit related, so I thought I'd pass it on. :)
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Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"
Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy
G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004
Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me
Bellevue, WA

#5 Mtndog

 
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Posted 04 April 2007 - 01:39 PM

There's a genetic tendency - especially in those of Greek, Turkish, and southern Italian decent, to be intolerant to fava beans. It's called favism, and causes red blood cells to pretty much explode when both copies of the genes are had. Turns out it's protective against malaria, especially amongst carriers who - drumroll - eat fava beans. The less than perfect state of the blood is better, genetically, than the effects of malaria, so the trait gets passed on. (I've been reading "Survival of the Sickest"... Interesting book.) Anyway, it was a bit related, so I thought I'd pass it on. :)


That is crazy! I'm intolerant to legumes so I'll have to keep my eye on lupin.

Favism :lol: Sorry but that cracks me up as whenever I hear about Fava beans all I can think about is Anthonthy Hopkins in silence of the lambs when he talks about fav beans and a nice chianti :ph34r:

I MISS chickpeas/hummus and ESPECIALLY falafel so much.
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Beverly

Gluten free since 2005

In the midst of winter, I found there was within me an invincible summer.
Albert Careb


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