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Gluten And Vitamins


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13 replies to this topic

#1 Maika

 
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Posted 30 March 2007 - 10:32 PM

Hello everyone!

I'm new here, so I hope I'm posting this in the correct place... =P And I just want to say that this board is such a great place of information!

I have been recently diagnosed with vitamin D and vitamin B12 deficiency. My doctor tells me that since these are rare to have a deficiency in, especially in my age group (I'm 19) he thinks that I may have some type of gluten intolerance, which is causing the vitamins to not be absorbed. So I am now supposed to be living gluten-free, which is why I'm here now!

I haven't noticed any stomach issues on my current diet, so there is no way of me knowing if I've really eaten any gluten by accident. I am currently taking prescribed vitamins, and I am (trying) to stay on a gluten-free diet, but how will I know whether the gluten is affecting me or not? And does gluten usually affect the absorption of vitamins?
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#2 RiceGuy

 
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Posted 31 March 2007 - 01:20 AM

Welcome to the board!

Firstly, there are many other symptoms of gluten intolerance besides stomach related ones. The main one I noticed from eating gluten was a dry mouth, but there was a boat load of other things I just didn't notice before, or simply attributed to something else. Once I went gluten-free, loads of things started clearing up for the first time in my life. I just didn't notice them as they had always been there, so it was like just a "normal" part of life (so I thought).

As for the nutrient deficiencies, Celiac does often cause malabsorption of various nutrients. I'd suggest taking magnesium too, because it helps with a lot of stuff including the assimilation of other nutrients! So your other deficiencies might be addressed far better with an extra amount of magnesium.

Other than that, stay on the gluten-free diet. Don't "cheat". Give it time and watch for improvements in ways you might never expect.
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A spherical meteorite 10 km in diameter traveling at 20 km/s has the kinetic energy equal to the calories in 550,000,000,000,000,000 Twinkies.

#3 BobG

 
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Posted 31 July 2007 - 06:01 PM

Couldn't agree more RiceGuy.. but there is one important fact with the Vitamin D deficiency, if you're not absorbing Vitamin D you are not getting the full value of any of the "C's", such as Vitamin C and Calcium which can lead to Degenerative Bone and Disk Disease, Osteopenia and Osteoporosis.

The reason that I bring it up is that if Maika has the deficiency D her doctor should be checking the C's as they can lead to Degenerative Bone and Disk Disease and Osteoporosis. I am currently suffering with Degenerative Bone and Disk Disease and Osteopenia.

At 56 years old it is literally crippling me and my Rheumatologist has run test and all come back showing that the Degenerative Bone and Disk Disease and Osteopenia is genetic in nature. If at 19 I had knowledge of having Celiac's and knowing that Celiac's is contributory to the Degenerative Bone and Disk Disease and Osteoporosis I would have made sure that I was absorbing D, C and Calcium.
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#4 P Diddy

 
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Posted 27 August 2009 - 10:27 AM

I called Centrum's hotline yesterday and was told that although they do not have gluten as an ingredient to their vitamin, they cannot vouch for where their ingredients have been. They are initiating a review process or application process to attain a certification that their product is gluten free. I asked if that would be a new or existing product and they explained that it was the existing Centrum product certification that was being sought.

Any suggestions on reasonably-priced multivitamins?
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#5 JillianLindsay

 
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Posted 27 August 2009 - 10:48 AM

Did your DR draw blood to test for celiac disease? It seems odd that he would start you on a gluten-free diet without any testing. If you have vitamin b12 deficiency you may be noticing fatigue. My celiac disease caused me to be anemic and whenever I get glutened I get horrible fatigue.

Good luck :)
Jillian


Hello everyone!

I'm new here, so I hope I'm posting this in the correct place... =P And I just want to say that this board is such a great place of information!

I have been recently diagnosed with vitamin D and vitamin B12 deficiency. My doctor tells me that since these are rare to have a deficiency in, especially in my age group (I'm 19) he thinks that I may have some type of gluten intolerance, which is causing the vitamins to not be absorbed. So I am now supposed to be living gluten-free, which is why I'm here now!

I haven't noticed any stomach issues on my current diet, so there is no way of me knowing if I've really eaten any gluten by accident. I am currently taking prescribed vitamins, and I am (trying) to stay on a gluten-free diet, but how will I know whether the gluten is affecting me or not? And does gluten usually affect the absorption of vitamins?


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#6 psawyer

 
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Posted 27 August 2009 - 10:57 AM

Due to the litigious (lawsuit-happy) nature of society today, most companies will not guarantee gluten-free status of their products.

Even those that test will not be able to guarantee zero gluten--only there is less that "x" parts per million (and we need to keep in mind that the "x" refers to the sensitivity of the test--zero is always less than "x").

I don't worry about those CYA disclaimers.
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Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
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#7 P Diddy

 
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Posted 28 August 2009 - 06:58 AM

Due to the litigious (lawsuit-happy) nature of society today, most companies will not guarantee gluten-free status of their products.

Even those that test will not be able to guarantee zero gluten--only there is less that "x" parts per million (and we need to keep in mind that the "x" refers to the sensitivity of the test--zero is always less than "x").

I don't worry about those CYA disclaimers.


I have yet to speak to a doctor about how absolutely paranoid I have to be. If something, like a vitamin, has a minor trace of gluten and it is a miniscule portion of my daily intake, will I have problems. Or, as I hope it is, these traces are inconsequential and the important thing is to ensure you do not consume gluten at any significant level (IE bread, pasta, ingredient listed on a label).

Bottom Line: Can I eat something that has no gluten in the ingredients or do I really need to be concerned about it being made in "a facility in which wheat products are produced"? Are their varying levels of intolerance and do test results or just trial and error show this?
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#8 JillianLindsay

 
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Posted 28 August 2009 - 07:08 AM

It's a personal decision and individual reaction. Some people choose to be 100% vigilant and not consume anything that may have come in contact with gluten. Some are extremely sensitive and will have reactions to even the teenist trace.

Trace amounts can be harmful to those with celiac disease. However, just because something was produced in a facility does not mean cross-contamination did occur, they may still have a dedicated area with dedicated machines, it depends on the company.

Yes, there are varying levels of intolerance and also people make decisions about how strict and careful they want to be. You will get the hang of it and, in consultation with your DR, you will figure out what's right for you :)

Good luck,
Jillian


I have yet to speak to a doctor about how absolutely paranoid I have to be. If something, like a vitamin, has a minor trace of gluten and it is a miniscule portion of my daily intake, will I have problems. Or, as I hope it is, these traces are inconsequential and the important thing is to ensure you do not consume gluten at any significant level (IE bread, pasta, ingredient listed on a label).

Bottom Line: Can I eat something that has no gluten in the ingredients or do I really need to be concerned about it being made in "a facility in which wheat products are produced"? Are their varying levels of intolerance and do test results or just trial and error show this?


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#9 P Diddy

 
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Posted 28 August 2009 - 09:08 AM

It's a personal decision and individual reaction. Some people choose to be 100% vigilant and not consume anything that may have come in contact with gluten. Some are extremely sensitive and will have reactions to even the teenist trace.

Trace amounts can be harmful to those with celiac disease. However, just because something was produced in a facility does not mean cross-contamination did occur, they may still have a dedicated area with dedicated machines, it depends on the company.

Yes, there are varying levels of intolerance and also people make decisions about how strict and careful they want to be. You will get the hang of it and, in consultation with your DR, you will figure out what's right for you :)

Good luck,
Jillian


Thanks Jillian and I hope my tone/comment was not taken to be disrespectful to other forum readers.
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#10 JillianLindsay

 
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Posted 28 August 2009 - 11:30 AM

I didn't see anything that would cause offence :)

Just remember though: even if you don't have symptoms, ingesting gluten is still harmful to your body.

Wishing you good health,
Jillian

Thanks Jillian and I hope my tone/comment was not taken to be disrespectful to other forum readers.


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#11 GottaSki

 
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Posted 28 August 2009 - 06:39 PM

Any suggestions on reasonably-priced multivitamins?


Large bottles of Nature Made Multi-Complete at Costo. Not sure what they cost at other stores.

Also the Costco brand Kirkland Calcium with D work great...my D levels were confirmed to be on the rise last month.
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-Lisa

Undiagnosed Celiac Disease ~ 43 years

3/26/09 gluten-free - dignosed celiac - blood 3/3/09, biopsy 3/26/09, double DQ2 / single DQ8 positive

10/25/13 - MCAD

Health history since celiac diagnosis became too long -- moved to the "about me" section of my profile

My children and I all have multiple copies of the genes for Celiac Disease, along with large variety of symptoms/resolution gluten-free

Current tally from me, three kids and two grands: 4 diagnosed with Celiac Disease, 2 NCGS

Get PROPERLY tested BEFORE REMOVING GLUTEN.

ALWAYS independently research health related information found on internet forums/blogs.

"LTES" a Gem :)


#12 lsocher

 
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Posted 02 February 2011 - 11:48 PM

Hi, all-

Keep in mind that not all vitamin delivery systems are effective. There are a lot of different technologies available, and it's a good idea to try them all and see what works.

To date, vitamin b12 can be utilized by getting regular injections (ouch!), vitamin b12 sublingual tablets (which I take now), nasal spray/gel or vitamin b12 patch. I myself have had the course of injections, which I hated, but were effective. Like I said, I take sublinguals now, but I feel like I am becoming deficient again. I am considering the b12 patch. (I really don't want to face that big fat needle again.) I will let you know how that works.

LS.
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#13 mushroom

 
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Posted 03 February 2011 - 01:57 AM

This is rather an old thread, isocher. Nevertheless, yes, there are many ways to take B12. I take the injections myself, because I do not tolerate the sublinguals and the patch is not available to me. I do not find the injections to be at all painful; Maybe I have a good nurse :)
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#14 OasisFlyer

 
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Posted 09 March 2011 - 09:46 AM

Welcome to the board!

Firstly, there are many other symptoms of gluten intolerance besides stomach related ones. The main one I noticed from eating gluten was a dry mouth, but there was a boat load of other things I just didn't notice before, or simply attributed to something else. Once I went gluten-free, loads of things started clearing up for the first time in my life. I just didn't notice them as they had always been there, so it was like just a "normal" part of life (so I thought).

As for the nutrient deficiencies, Celiac does often cause malabsorption of various nutrients. I'd suggest taking magnesium too, because it helps with a lot of stuff including the assimilation of other nutrients! So your other deficiencies might be addressed far better with an extra amount of magnesium.

Other than that, stay on the gluten-free diet. Don't "cheat". Give it time and watch for improvements in ways you might never expect.


I'm new here and have been reading around the site, but this post caught my attention. I also *seem* to get dry mouth from eating gluten!!! I am untested (and therefore undiagnosed), and just doing some research before my doc appointment tomorrow. I thought I was crazy that eating "carbs" made me have dry mouth... maybe it wasn't "carbs" after all!!!!!!!!
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