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Grain Fed Beef?


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18 replies to this topic

#16 Lisa

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Posted 05 April 2007 - 02:27 PM

Stepping in,

No scientific facts here, but Dr. Oz (who I think is cool) said that a steak can sit in your stomach for up to 7 days before it breaks down.

Quietly stepping out.
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Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

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#17 ginghamkim

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Posted 11 April 2007 - 11:19 AM

I feel like a bit of an idiot right now. I know the topic is "grain fed beef," but the last poster mentioned STRAW and that got me to thinking and wondering, what most straw if made of. So I googled it and it can be from any grain, including wheat, barley, oats, rice, etc......I hope that I'm not taking this topic too off thread but does anybody know where most straw usually orginates from? Such as that used in decorations or making a scarecrow etc.? And I thought that I'd had all my bases covered, what with my food, body products, etc and making sure to wash my hands even more often after touching anything in public. Yikes! It's always something, isn't it? :o


Angelbender,

Most people don't know the difference between straw and hay unless you farmed. Straw is the stem, leaves and haul of wheat. After wheat grain is stripped from the plant, the farm machinery called a combine, spits the stem, leaves and haul back on the ground. This is called straw. Then a bailer will take the stem, leaves and haul and pact it really tight into bales that can be used for livestock bedding, yards and such. Animals don't eat straw, this includes, horses, sheep, cattle and hogs. They can, but they would rather eat feed and sleep on straw. In the US, straw is primarily made from wheat. The stem, leaves, and haul of oats are used as hay (which is another primary source of cattle feed) but it is expensive to plant and to feed.

Most beef that you find in the grocery store were raised in feed lots where there are thousands of head of cattle and they are feed corn only, no hay. Hay would be to expensive to feed out. They stand on concrete all day with no grass or hay. When you think about what you buy in the grocery store, you have ask yourself "what is the cheapest way to produce this in mass quantity".

I hope this answers your question. I like these questions b/c there is alot of misperception about the farming community. :)

Kim
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Gluten-free since 12/25/06. Soy-free since 3/1/07. High-fructose corn syrup and hydrogenated oil free.
Initial problems with gallbladder and pancreas. Taking digestive enzymes to help.

#18 chatycady

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Posted 12 April 2007 - 05:40 PM

I'm from Iowa and most the beef and dairy cattle here graze on pasture, are fed alfalfa hay and feed made with ground up corn. We don't grow wheat here, but oats. Most of the oats in my area is not harvested as grain, but as hay or oatlage.

Horses like oats, but it makes them frisky and fat!

If cattle were allowed to graze only, on "native" grasses, they would be skinny and their meat tough as leather! There is nothing better than a juicy Iowa corn fed beef T-bone steak with a glass of wine!
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Rheumatic fever at age 5 and again at age 6. Antibiotics for 6 years to prevent strep throat.
Anemia, Mono, Hepititis, Pernicious Anemia, Enlarged Heart, Osteopenia, Vitamin D deficiency, Ataxia, Digestive issues, reactive hypoglycemia, and on and on and on!

Following the SCD diet after gluten free didn't solve symptoms. Much better and getting back my life!

#19 ginghamkim

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Posted 15 May 2007 - 11:10 AM

At diagnosis, DD was also intolerant to dairy, soy and all meats. This makes getting protein and iron somewhat difficult. She can now handle everything except beef. Dh wondered allowed if this didn't have something to do with the "grain fed" part. Is there anyway for gluten to get into the beef this way or is it still a separate intolerance altogether?


Hi...I know this is an older post, but I wanted to tell you about my experience over the weekend. I had to purchase steak from the grocery store (starts with W and is all over the nation) for the first time since going gluten-free (we have freezer full of beef from my uncle's farm and I've not had to buy it), and I believe I was glutened by it. It must be the dye...it has to be the dye that is injected. I only had a couple of pieces of steak and I am in pain still from it.

Make sure to talk to the butcher, assuming they are knowlegable. We talked to a fish monger at another grocery store chain (starts with M) about the trout. I asked if the sea trout had any artificial color in it and he said "[the company] says that it doesn't, but I say it does." He then compared it to some lake trout and there was a definate color difference. He said that fish is not that pink when you fillet it and people won't buy it if it is its normal color. Scary to think.

Anyway, thought I would share.

Kim
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Gluten-free since 12/25/06. Soy-free since 3/1/07. High-fructose corn syrup and hydrogenated oil free.
Initial problems with gallbladder and pancreas. Taking digestive enzymes to help.


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