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Forbidden Ingredients?
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I read "Wheat Free, Worry Free", and made a copy of the page that contains a list of "forbidden foods". Why do some products that seem to be gluten free have ingredients from this forbidden list? For instance; cirtic acid, mono- and diglycerides, all flavorings, etc. I'm concerner because I've heard Jiff PB is ok, yet it has mono- and diglycerides in the ingredients. I heard Cheetos are ok, yet they have cirtic acid in the ingredients. Is there a better list I should be going off of. We are only 2 months into the gluten-free world and I'm still floundering out here. All of you are so very helpful.

Thanks,

TBird

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Wheat free does not mean gluten free. Sometimes malt flavoring is used too. You have to look for things that say Barley, Rye, Oats. Malt flavoring could be from barley. Hope this helps a little.

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It sounds like you have a list which is at best misleading.

The examples you mention should not be considered "forbidden," but rather as representing conceivable sources of gluten. If you have doubts about them, you should check with the manufacturer, but in most cases they are not a concern.

Also, be aware that there are a number of manufacturers who have a policy of clearly labeling gluten. With these brands/companies you just read the ingredients. If you don't see the gluten listed (as wheat, rye, barley or oats) then it simply isn't there.

The list that I use is:

Arrowhead Mills, Aunt Nelly's, Balance, Baskin Robbins, Ben & Jerry, Bertoli, Betty Crocker, Blue Bunny, Breyers, Campbells, Cascadian Farms, Celestial Seasonings, ConAgra, Country Crock, Edy's, General Mills, Good Humor, Green Giant, Haagen Daz, Hellman's, Hormel, Hungry Jack, Jiffy, Knorr, Kozy Shack, Kraft, Lawry's, Libby's, Lipton, Martha White, Maxwell House, McCormick, Nabisco, Nestle, Old El Paso, Ortega, Pillsbury, Popsicle, Post, Progresso, Ragu, Russell Stover, Seneca Foods, Skippy, Smucker, Stokely's, Sunny Delight, T Marzetti, Tyson, Unilever, Wishbone, Yoplait, Zatarain's.

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T-Bird...I am relatively new to this, too, and it definitely can be overwhelming! This site has a very comprehensive list of what is ok and what is not. If you go to the site index, the 8th item down is a safe and forbidden food list. It even lists things that might be ok in the US, but not other countries and why. I guess I feel pretty comfortable using this guide since it comes from the celiac.com website.

Citric Acid is listed as safe, as are mono and diglycerides according to this list...I'm confused that they would be on a forbidden list.

Good luck!

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There are many lists and some are old. It could be that in the past items like citric acid and mono and diglycerides were indeed sometimes made from wheat, but those two items are no longer considered a threat.

As already explained, there are a number of things that are not actually "forbidden" but instead should just be checked. These items are actually almost always gluten-free, but on rare occasions can have gluten.

Malt is one item that can be and sometimes is made from something other than barley, but it's so rare you MUST assume that anything that says malt or malt flavoring comes from barley.

richard

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Malt is one item that can be and sometimes is made from something other than barley, but it's so rare you MUST assume that anything that says malt or malt flavoring comes from barley.

I have to say I have only ever come across it as barley malt. Thanks for pointing this out Richard.

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It sounds like you have a list which is at best misleading.

The examples you mention should not be considered "forbidden," but rather as representing conceivable sources of gluten. If you have doubts about them, you should check with the manufacturer, but in most cases they are not a concern.

I think that sums it up pretty well. A lot of things that in the US are derived from corn are derived from wheat in Europe...

The amount of gluten is speculative anyway... but I know I react to things in Europe labelled with dextrines and maltodextrine for instance which is safe if made in the US.

Also, be aware that there are a number of manufacturers who have a policy of clearly labeling gluten. With these brands/companies you just read the ingredients. If you don't see the gluten listed (as wheat, rye, barley or oats) then it simply isn't there.

That depends on the policy...and its exact wording...

Some companies say they will not knowingly hide gluten which isn't the same thing.... especially when they buy raw materials since unless they are told specifically for instance that a maltodextrine they jusy bought 400 tons of from a supplier does contain gluten they can use it unknowingly...

This can be a don't ask don't tell policy or just plain not specifically asking...

The bottom line is I doubt the purchasing dept has instructions to ask... rather they source the cheapest bulk sources ...

At the moment the $ is so weak it's doubtful any of the sources of these items is likely from Europe but if the $ were much stronger then its possible that its cheaper to buy 500 tons of maltodextrine from a European source than a domestic one.

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