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New Research About Gliadin (gluten) In Breast Milk


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27 replies to this topic

#1 Nancym

 
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Posted 27 April 2007 - 01:58 PM

Sorry: On restrospect, not new research, old research no one seems to have read.

I think parents figured this out LONG before doctors and researchers. Kudos to you bright folks!

Presence of High Levels of Non-Degraded Gliadin in Breast Milk from Healthy Mothers

Results: Gliadin was detected in all 49 milk samples. Its concentration varied between 5 and 1200 ng/ml (mean, 178 ng/ml). In colostrum (n = 14) gliadin levels were higher (range, 28-9000 ng/ml; mean, 883 ng/ml), not being detectable in one case. Gliadin was detectable in 14 of 31 serum samples, in which levels were lower than in milk and colostrum samples (mean, 41 ng/ml). Neither a correlation between gliadin levels in milk, colostrum, and serum samples from the same subject nor a relation between gluten intake and gliadin concentration in milk samples from six subjects under a 3-day gluten-free diet could be found. Higher levels of immune complexes were observed in colostrum samples than in milk and serum samples. No correlation was detected between gliadin concentration and the level of immune complexes. The analysis of milk and colostrum samples by immunoblotting showed bands of immunoreactive gliadin presenting Mr similar to those of native proteins from wheat extracts. Conclusions: Very high levels of gliadin were detected in milk samples from healthy mothers on an unrestricted diet. Gliadin levels were higher than those reported for dietary antigens in other studies. Breast milk contained non-degraded gliadins and gliadin/anti-gliadin IgA immune complexes.


So... if they're feeding cows wheat couldn't it be part of the reason some of us don't get any better when drinking milk?
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#2 Ursa Major

 
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Posted 27 April 2007 - 02:52 PM

I think parents figured this out LONG before doctors and researchers. Kudos to you bright folks!

Presence of High Levels of Non-Degraded Gliadin in Breast Milk from Healthy Mothers
So... if they're feeding cows wheat couldn't it be part of the reason some of us don't get any better when drinking milk?



Yep, I have thought about that, too. If human mothers will have the gliadin in their milk when eating gluten grains, it makes sense that it would also be in the milk of cows that are being fed wheat.

On the other hand, wheat is usually fed to cattle to fatten them up for slaughter. Dairy cows don't need to be fattened, since obviously, the intent to slaughter them isn't there. So the question is: Do farmers feed dairy cows wheat?

I will ask my future son-in-law, who's family owns a dairy farm. I see them tomorrow. My daughter constantly reminds me not to say things like, "NOBODY should drink dairy, it isn't good for humans!" in his presence, because I forget that it might offend him. But the truth is the truth.
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I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

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#3 jerseyangel

 
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Posted 27 April 2007 - 03:24 PM

This is interesting--I never thought of it :huh: but it does make sense to me that if a cow eats wheat, the milk could have gluten--the same as a human.

Wow. Ursula, I'll be very interested to hear what you find out. :)

BTW, that is a very impressive recorder collection. I love the recorder--I have one that I've had since I was about 10.
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Patti


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"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

#4 AndreaB

 
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Posted 27 April 2007 - 03:30 PM

I had this figured out due to my son's eczema which didn't clear up until I went gluten free.

As far as cows and wheat. Would having four stomaches help with the processing of the wheat? :unsure: I know they do better on grass though.
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Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.


#5 JennyC

 
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Posted 27 April 2007 - 03:56 PM

Wow that really makes sense. I breastfed my son for 9 months. He constantly spit up, even as he got older. It was not until I switched to formula (that happened to be gluten free) that he quit spitting up. By that age he was also consuming lots of gluten on his own and his diarrhea and classic celiac symptoms remained. It really puts it all into perspective. Thank you for the informative post.
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Jenny

Son 6 yrs old, Positive blood work, Outstanding dietary response, no biopsy.
Household mostly gluten free since 3/07

Me: HLA-DQ 02 & 0302 (DQ 08), which I ran & analyzed myself!Currently gluten lite, negative tTG, asymptomatic

#6 Ursa Major

 
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Posted 27 April 2007 - 04:09 PM

BTW, that is a very impressive recorder collection. I love the recorder--I have one that I've had since I was about 10.


Thanks, Patti. I play them, too, so it is a practical collection as well. ;) And by next week I'll have another one, as today is my 28th wedding anniversary, and my husband is giving me another recorder! Those in the picture are only my wooden recorders, I have plastic ones as well (which obviously aren't nearly worth as much).

I'll let you know what Ben says tomorrow (I hope I remember to ask him, as I am playing some recorder pieces in a recital tomorrow, and I am kind of nervous about that).
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I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

#7 jerseyangel

 
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Posted 27 April 2007 - 04:18 PM

Ursula--congratulations to you and your husband on your anniversary! :D

Enjoy your new recorder :)
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Patti


"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

"When people show you who they are, believe them"--Maya Angelou

"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

#8 Nancym

 
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Posted 27 April 2007 - 06:43 PM

I had this figured out due to my son's eczema which didn't clear up until I went gluten free.

As far as cows and wheat. Would having four stomaches help with the processing of the wheat? :unsure: I know they do better on grass though.

Cows are geared towards digesting grasses. Grains give them a really acidic stomach so they have to keep them on antibiotics so they don't die of horrible stomach infections. So no, having 4 stomachs doesn't help out a cow being fed grain. :\
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#9 HawkFire

 
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Posted 27 April 2007 - 07:05 PM

So, would any and all dairy products contain gluten then? Like perhaps gluten free breads prepared with dairy. Or whey protein. Would that have gluten? We are dairy free anyway, but it this news throws a wrench in any and all gluten free foods prepared with dairy.
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The American Diet of Chips, soda, ice cream, Goldfish Crackers, bread for breakfast (cereal, donuts, waffles, toast, bagels) cereal bars, "gummies", candy, msg, dairy products of all kinds, soy, and other chemicals - is Killing us and promoting diseases. BE HEALTHY. EAT NATURAL FOODS. DO NOT INGEST CHEMICALS! If you cannot pronounce it, do not eat it. Use Coconut oil. Eat herbs in salads. NO DAIRY. LOVE YOURSELF. LOVE YOUR FAMILY. FOOD IS MEDICINE!

#10 Nancym

 
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Posted 27 April 2007 - 08:51 PM

I guess first thing to figure out is if dairy cows are fed wheat.
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#11 happygirl

 
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Posted 28 April 2007 - 06:15 AM

Nancy---Thanks for posting this. I was a bit confused though---you mentioned it is new research, but the article was published in 1998?
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#12 Nancym

 
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Posted 28 April 2007 - 07:26 AM

Hey, it's new to me! Sorry, I didn't check the date, I just assumed it was new.

What dairy cows might get fed
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#13 sillyactsue

 
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Posted 28 April 2007 - 07:58 AM

Hey, it's new to me! Sorry, I didn't check the date, I just assumed it was new.

What dairy cows might get fed



Hi Nancy,

I went to your link and saw that they are given wheat middlings. After reading the definition of wheat middling I still don't know what it is but it says protein. It is all greek (I mean gluten) to me.

:blink: :unsure:
Gloria
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#14 Nancym

 
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Posted 28 April 2007 - 01:18 PM

The protein part of wheat is unfortunately the very stuff we can't eat.
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#15 loraleena

 
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Posted 28 April 2007 - 03:08 PM

Even more reason for everyone to eat only grass fed organic meat and dairy products.
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