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New Lactose Problems?


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26 replies to this topic

#1 FreyaUSA

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Posted 08 October 2004 - 09:12 AM

Lately I've been noticing that whenever I have milk my stomach becomes incredibly burbly and noisy. I mainly use soymilk, but I use butter, cheese, sour cream, yogurt, etc. A couple days ago I was in a constant state of discomfort after having a small bowl of cereal with lf milk. Yesterday, I avoided everything until I had a piece of cheese (without even thinking about it.) Then I was mildly burbly. Today I had yogurt for breakfast and NO PROBLEM. But at lunch I fixed enchiladas with cheese and sour cream and am now mildly burbly and uncomfortable. It's almost enough to make me cry! Is this a "serious" lactose problem or is this just one of those things I can basically ignore by using lactaid or acidophilous or whatever (and just stay away from milk?) Any suggestions? Just the thought of having to go CF too makes me so depressed (and here I'd thought I'd handled the diet change so well.) :(
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#2 burdee

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Posted 08 October 2004 - 10:42 AM

Try using 'lactaid' supplements (chewable tablets) when you consume milk products OR try 'Lactaid' or Dairy Ease or any lactose free brands of milk instead. Yogurt bacteria help digest lactose, so yogurt may not give you similar symptoms. Many of us noticed problems with other foods AFTER we eliminated the gluten, because we didn't experience the extreme gluten reaction symptoms anymore. Since you don't have problems with yogurt, you probably don't have casein (milk protein in all cow's milk products) intolerance, but you could have lactose (milk sugar) intolerance. That's easier to fix by using lactaid supplements while you still enjoy dairy products. ;)
BURDEE
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Gluten, dairy, soy, egg, cane sugar, vanilla and nutmeg free. Enterolab diagnosed gluten/casein intolerant 7/04; soy intolerant 8/07. ELISA test diagnosed egg/cane sugar IgG allergies 8/06; vanilla/nutmeg 8/06. 2006-10 diagnosed by DNA Microbial stool tests and successfully treated: Klebsiella, Enterobacter Cloaecae, Cryptosporidia, Candida, C-diff, Achromobacter, H. Pylori and Dientamoeba Fragilis. 6/10 Heidelberg capsule test diagnosed hypochloridia. Vitamin D deficiency, hypothyroiditis, hypochloridia and low white blood cells caused vulnerability to infections. I now take Betaine HCl, probiotics, Vitamin D and T3 thyroid supplement to maintain immunity.


#3 GEF

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Posted 08 October 2004 - 11:15 AM

Are your lactose intolerance symptoms worse through times of stress? I have found that is the case with me... just wondering if that could be a factor for you as well.

Gretchen
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#4 MySuicidalTurtle

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Posted 08 October 2004 - 05:08 PM

I started using goats milk and it has been going well but then early this week I used cows milk and whoa my body was not happy. I stopped eatching cheese and stuff, too. It's frustrating.
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#5 FreyaUSA

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Posted 08 October 2004 - 05:14 PM

I have to say, in a relative sense, my lactose problems are the worst they've ever been (since I never noticed them before) and the stress level currently is pretty darned low. Go figure! So, I'm going to try the lactaid tablets. I had a bit of cheese with dinner tonight and I'm not really uncomfortable, but definitely not feeling as good as I was before dinner. Earlier I had something with a little reddi wip on it and wasn't feeling too great after that either.

Would acidophilous (spelling?) work like lactaid? I have some of those in my fridge.

Thank you for the info on the difference between lactose and casein reactions! It definitely isn't a problem with yogurt, in fact, I tend to feel better all day if I eat some (and now I know why.) It is interesting that other problems do become more obvious as we clear our bodies from gluten. I really haven't ever felt as good as I do now (except for the lactose thing.) I'm certainly more aware of how my body reacts to foods than I've ever been (had I ever really thought of it before? I can't remember.)

Thank you for your help here. I feel MUCH better.
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#6 burdee

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Posted 08 October 2004 - 07:26 PM

No, acidophilus won't help with lactose intolerance. You need the lactase enzyme (contained in those lactaid supplements) to digest lactose. Before I learned about 'lactaid', I tried acidophilus milk, which did ZIP for my lactose intolerance symptoms ... but then I also have cow's milk intolerance (lactose, casein, whey or whatever's in cow's milk). Try the 'lactaid' or generic lactase enzymes--Rite Aid stores carry a cheaper version with the same potency.
BURDEE
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Gluten, dairy, soy, egg, cane sugar, vanilla and nutmeg free. Enterolab diagnosed gluten/casein intolerant 7/04; soy intolerant 8/07. ELISA test diagnosed egg/cane sugar IgG allergies 8/06; vanilla/nutmeg 8/06. 2006-10 diagnosed by DNA Microbial stool tests and successfully treated: Klebsiella, Enterobacter Cloaecae, Cryptosporidia, Candida, C-diff, Achromobacter, H. Pylori and Dientamoeba Fragilis. 6/10 Heidelberg capsule test diagnosed hypochloridia. Vitamin D deficiency, hypothyroiditis, hypochloridia and low white blood cells caused vulnerability to infections. I now take Betaine HCl, probiotics, Vitamin D and T3 thyroid supplement to maintain immunity.


#7 lisabarella

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Posted 09 October 2004 - 03:20 PM

How long have you been gluten-free? The lactose enzyme is on the tip of the villi. So, if your villi are still not completely grown back, or are still lower than the crypt cell, then the lactose enzyme might not be abundant in your system. I take a pill called WHOLE ENZYME with every meal. You can get it at whole foods. It contains all of the enzymes that your body should naturally make. I had problems with milk too - the enzyme supplement cured it.
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Lisa A. Barella, PhD
Reno, NV
Confirmed Celiac by biopsy - July 18th 2003
4 people in family with Celiac Disease (mom, two brothers, me)
lisabarella at hotmail dot com

#8 FreyaUSA

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Posted 10 October 2004 - 06:23 AM

Interesting about the enzyme, I'll have to consider that (though price is an issue too. I'll do a comparison shop, lol) I've been gluten-free, with the occasional accidental consumption, for about 7 months now. How long does it take for the villi to completely recover?
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#9 lisabarella

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Posted 13 October 2004 - 05:28 PM

I think it is 6 months to 2 years, but each person is different and there is refractive?? celiacs in which people don't see a huge response to the gluten-free diet. My villi seem to want to take the long road to healing. From what I was told from my GI, the villi are suppose to be in a 4:1 ratio with the cell (villi:cell), i.e the villi are 4 times higher than the cell and thus able to absorb nutrients. My villi were 0:1, i.e non existent at dignosis (July 18th 2003) and are now 1:1 (May 2004). Such is life:)
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Lisa A. Barella, PhD
Reno, NV
Confirmed Celiac by biopsy - July 18th 2003
4 people in family with Celiac Disease (mom, two brothers, me)
lisabarella at hotmail dot com

#10 tarnalberry

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Posted 13 October 2004 - 09:01 PM

It is also natural in humans to lose the ability to digest lactose over time. In fact, in some major populations, it's rare to be able to continue digesting large amounts of lactose past the age of two. (It's a genetic thing that occured after the advent of dairy sources that provided a large enough survival advantage that the ability to continue consuming dairy after weaning has made big inrodes in the gene pool.)
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Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"
Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy
G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004
Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me
Bellevue, WA

#11 Guest_LisaB_*

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Posted 13 October 2004 - 10:13 PM

Hi everybody, just wanted to say that you may want to look at a bunch of info I just posted on a post entitled "Kefir", there is an article their about how kefir culture improves milk/lactose digestion as well as others that show that kefir recolonizes the intestines with probiotics (and kicks Candida out by the way), heals the intestines, improves the immune system, creates enzymes and is a wonderful source of vitamins and minerals. I will say that digestive enzymes are great but since drinking kefir, I don't need to supplement them anymore.

Hope this helps everybody!
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#12 kabowman

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Posted 14 October 2004 - 07:13 AM

My 2 cents - my lactose/casien intolerance has gone from mild to bad to worse over the last 5 years. Even with lactose tablets - I now avoid it completely, just like all the other foods that make me sick. I have switched to goat's milk too, although I am still adjusting to the taste, like I had to adjust to soy milk when I switched to that years ago which I have had to give up due to soy bean intolerance. However, my mother can still eat ice cream and drink milk occasionally if she takes the pills and she has been lactose intolerant longer than me.

-Kate
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-Kate
gluten-free since July 2004

Other Intolerances:
Strawberries and Banannas (2007)
Nitrates (April 2006)
Yeast (which includes all vinegar so no condiments) (Oct. 2004)
Peanuts (Nov. 2004)
Soy (Oct. 2004)
Almonds (Sept. 2004)
Corn (Sept. 2004)
Lactose/Casein (1999)

#13 burdee

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Posted 14 October 2004 - 07:43 AM

Hey Kate: I had a similar experience. Lactaid pills seemed to help me for years. But when I had excruciating undiagnosed celiac pain, avoiding gluten reduced most of that pain. When I did Enterolab tests for gluten and milk sensitivity, I learned the source of the rest of my symptoms: CASEIN (the milk protein) antibodies/intolerance. So lactaid pills for lactose (milk sugar) didn't prevent my casein reaction. I also had intolerance to soy, so I just avoid all dairy products (and soy/dairy substitutes). Another friend whose E-lab results told her she had casein intolerance tried goat's milk with disastrous results. I read that goat's milk STILL has casein, just not as much as cow's milk. So I don't want to risk a reaction. Avoiding gluten/dairy/soy is challenging, but well worth it on 'good' days. :D
BURDEE
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Gluten, dairy, soy, egg, cane sugar, vanilla and nutmeg free. Enterolab diagnosed gluten/casein intolerant 7/04; soy intolerant 8/07. ELISA test diagnosed egg/cane sugar IgG allergies 8/06; vanilla/nutmeg 8/06. 2006-10 diagnosed by DNA Microbial stool tests and successfully treated: Klebsiella, Enterobacter Cloaecae, Cryptosporidia, Candida, C-diff, Achromobacter, H. Pylori and Dientamoeba Fragilis. 6/10 Heidelberg capsule test diagnosed hypochloridia. Vitamin D deficiency, hypothyroiditis, hypochloridia and low white blood cells caused vulnerability to infections. I now take Betaine HCl, probiotics, Vitamin D and T3 thyroid supplement to maintain immunity.


#14 tarnalberry

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Posted 14 October 2004 - 08:14 AM

That's one of the biggest bummers about being casein intolerant - no more kefir. (And I really haven't been able to get into goat's milk enough to get past the nausea at the taste to see if I tolerate it. ;-) )
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Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"
Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy
G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004
Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me
Bellevue, WA

#15 kabowman

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Posted 14 October 2004 - 08:36 AM

Well, the goat's milk info is interesting and would explain my reaction to pumpkin pie made with goat's milk. No soy for me and I already know I am casien intolerant. Thanks...back to rice milk.

-Kate
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-Kate
gluten-free since July 2004

Other Intolerances:
Strawberries and Banannas (2007)
Nitrates (April 2006)
Yeast (which includes all vinegar so no condiments) (Oct. 2004)
Peanuts (Nov. 2004)
Soy (Oct. 2004)
Almonds (Sept. 2004)
Corn (Sept. 2004)
Lactose/Casein (1999)


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