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Malic Acid Reaction?


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7 replies to this topic

#1 VioletBlue

 
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Posted 14 June 2007 - 10:45 AM

I made a lovely tomato sauce using a gluten free enchilada sauce as a base last night. I was so sick after. I'm still not feeling well. Everything else was gluten-free, and this wasn't a gluten reaction. Gluten has a much more sublte effect on me. The only thing that stood out on the ingredient list was Malic Acid. I looked it up and it naturally occures in apples, grapes, cherries etc. It's responsbile for the slight sourness some fruits have. I've always had a problem with eating fruits like that in large amounts and never understood why.

Anyone else have a probem with Malic Acid. It's in so many things, both naturally and as an added flavor enhancer. I'd give anything to be wrong, but I don't think I am. I'm tired of the allergies. I just want to be normal again.

Violet
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"My mother always told me, it's okay to play with a man's mind
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#2 sixtytwo

 
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Posted 14 June 2007 - 07:30 PM

I take a lot of magnesium with malic acid and have no problems. It is taken to help with fibromyalgia, they have found that people with fibro and migraines can be seriouly lacking in magnesium. The expert at my healthfood store, who has celiac disease, recommended it and along with the perscription, Mobic, my fibro pain is at a minimum until I overwork or overstress. Then I just ache all over. Barbara
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#3 GFinMN

 
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Posted 20 June 2007 - 08:22 AM

Yes, I have been allergic to both Malic Acid and Tartaric Acid my whole life. It was diagnosed by my allergist when I was in elementary school. I was just diagnosed with Celiac this past April.

There must be a connection with all these allergies :)
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#4 VioletBlue

 
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Posted 20 June 2007 - 01:08 PM

Yes, I have been allergic to both Malic Acid and Tartaric Acid my whole life. It was diagnosed by my allergist when I was in elementary school. I was just diagnosed with Celiac this past April.

There must be a connection with all these allergies :)


Yes, unfortunately there is a connection between Celiac and allergies. They think it has to do with leaky gut syndrome. I've had a problem with eating certain fruits for a long time. I had no idea why. Apparently I've had allergies for a long time, but the gluten just kind of masked the worst of it. Now without gluten in my body all the allergies are becoming more obvious. :blink: I'd be afraid to have allergy tests done. I can't handle anymore knowledge, LOL.

violet
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"My mother always told me, it's okay to play with a man's mind
as long as you put it back where you got it when you're done with it."

#5 VioletBlue

 
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Posted 01 July 2007 - 03:27 PM

Yes, I have been allergic to both Malic Acid and Tartaric Acid my whole life. It was diagnosed by my allergist when I was in elementary school. I was just diagnosed with Celiac this past April.

There must be a connection with all these allergies :)


How to you manage? I ate a handful of cherries this morning and I'm so sick now with nausea and diarehha. It's in so many fruits. What do you avoid? Do some things bother you more than others? It used to be it took more than a handful. Now it doesn't take much at all to make me sick.

violet
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"My mother always told me, it's okay to play with a man's mind
as long as you put it back where you got it when you're done with it."

#6 grey

 
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Posted 01 July 2007 - 07:52 PM

I;ve found myself more sensitive to some kinds of fruit and other things since going gluten-free too.

How do you get tested for allergies like malic acid? Does an allergist do it?
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#7 Arlek

 
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Posted 15 December 2010 - 03:36 AM

I;ve found myself more sensitive to some kinds of fruit and other things since going gluten-free too.


I don't know about allergies, but when it comes to intolerances and sensitivities, it's perfectly understandable why more of them would appear after giving up gluten. One must keep in mind that certain minerals are required for the production of certain enzymes. After a dramatic change of diet, it's quite understandable that you may develop deficiencies you did not used to have. Those deficiencies can cause a lack of enzymes, which can cause food intolerances.

I strongly recommend considering and/or researching the following array of supplements if you're on a gluten-free diet and are experiencing an increase of intolerance-related symptoms:
• Food grade diatomaceous earth (don't know why, but this has helped a ton, especially with sugar, nuts, etc.); food grade diatomaceous earth is rich in amorphous silica (not the cancerous crystalline silica like the non-food-grade kind); it also contains other trace minerals; it absorbs a lot of water, though, so you'll need to drink more water while you take it (1 to 3 tablespoons full of diatomaceous earth a day is what they usually recommend, though starting with 1, just in case of die-off reactions)
• Zinc picolinate (zinc is needed for over a hundred enzymes; I recommend zinc picolinate over other forms of zinc; zinc oxide has been proven to be ineffective, by the way; try not to take more than 40mg a day; well, I take a 50mg pill once in a while, and a 20mg pill at other times—I figure it should probably balance out since I'm not taking the 50mg one every day)
• Boron picolinate (boron is needed for some enzymes; boron picolinate is the only form of boron I've tried, but I can feel that it does work; perhaps a borax foot soak would work, too, but I haven't tried that, yet)
• Vitamin A (if you have a zinc deficiency, odds are you have a vitamin A deficiency, too, even if you've been eating enough vitamin A)
• Vitamin D3 (lanolin-derived; I've heard this is good to take with zinc and vitamin A for some reason I don't remember—but even if it doesn't relate to enzymes, it'll still be good for you in lots of other ways, especially if you get depressed and stuff like that)
• Magnesium malate (magnesium is needed for hundreds of enzymes; be very careful not to overdose on magnesium—it can be bad; if you just follow the pill bottle's advice, you'll probably be fine; other forms of magnesium might be good to try, too, especially if you have problems with malic acid)
• Malic acid (malic acid and magnesium malate are not the same thing, by the way; magnesium malate is a synthetic compound of magnesium and malic acid, while malic acid by itself has nothing to do with magnesium; you can order pure malic acid by the pound at nutsonline.com)

Also, it's good to know that metal poisoning can inhibit some enzymes. For instance, mercury and lead can inhibit the enzymes responsible for digesting wheat gluten and milk casein.

Both diatomaceous earth and malic acid help to remove toxic metals from the body. Malic acid is said even to help remove aluminum (aluminum can damage the liver and kidneys, and thus lead to all sorts of food-related issues). So, these might help to clear those out so your body can produce more enzymes and use them properly.

If you're concerned about aluminum, I strongly recommend avoiding mineral salt deodorants (those made with alum, which is a mineral compound, partly of aluminum), antiperspirants, processed cheese, aluminum cookware, tin foil, calcium antacids (the ones with aluminum in them) and such. Dessert Essence deodorant might be a good one to consider. It actually uses borax (sodium borate) instead of aluminum—so you might absorb the borax through your skin and get some benefits of the boron (killing two birds with one stone), although I think it does work as an antiperspirant—so you might not sweat out toxins as needed. I haven't actually tried that deodorant, though, so let me know if you do, and if you notice anything nutritionally from it, heh, heh.

If you have problems with malic acid right now, you might consider trying it again after taking the above-mentioned minerals. There's a possibility that you might have the right enzymes to digest it afterward, if that was the problem.

I haven't actually been taking magnesium, yet, but I've tried all the other things, and they definitely help. I haven't taken malic acid in its pure form (just in something that contains some), but I have some on order—so feel free to ask about that in a few days if you like.

Anyway, since I've started on diatomaceous earth and zinc, I've noticed that I can eat tons of foods that I couldn't handle well before, including the following:
• Raw food (not only can I handle this now, but it actually feels extremely good for me)
• Nuts (though I have an easier time with raw nuts than cooked ones, now)
• Sugar in general
• Pretty much everything is less severe, actually (even gluten, although I haven't eaten lots of it yet to experiment, just a little here and there; I'll probably try that after I add malic acid and/or magnesium to my supplements; I'm excited to see if that helps); I'm not diagnosed with celiac disease, by the way, but I do seem to have issues with gluten (I suspect it might be enzyme-related, or related to heavy metal poisoning and/or worms, but I'm still trying to verify this, as you can see); if you're scratching your head wondering how worms could have anything to do with gluten-intolerance, just keep in mind that they can cause nutritional deficiencies, and nutritional deficiencies can cause enzyme deficiencies (enzyme deficiencies can cause intolerances). So, yeah, might want to make sure you're parasite-free. Parasites can be asymptomatic, by the way. Curezone.com is a great place where people discuss parasites and stuff and natural ways of dealing with them (although if you can convince a doctor to test you for parasites, that might be good, too).
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#8 Linda Annie

 
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Posted 04 September 2014 - 08:05 AM

For allergy sufferers in general, including malic acid sensitivity and things you may not consider allergies, I would suggest trying NAET therapy-Nambutripad Allergy Elimination Therapy (I'm not spelling Nambutripad correctly). I make this suggestion based on experience. You may have to help the practitioner, depending on your symptoms and their understandings, but it's worth it. For individual substances, results are quick, but overall progress, depending also on health status and the extent of allergies and related conditions, including those you may not think are related, is incremental., which also means it's progressive.
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