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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Smirnoff
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19 posts in this topic



Yes!

But not the "malted beverage" products ... the ones like beer.

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Smirnoff is made from corn. Even if you don't believe that gluten does not pass into the distallate, there is no gluten in the mash in the first place.

There is a huge facility in Muscatine, Iowa, that processes corn into ethyl alcohol for Smirnoff, among others. Read here about Grain Processing Corporation. They also make other products from corn, including a well known brand of corn oil, and the World's Best Cat Litter.

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Smirnoff is made from corn. Even if you don't believe that gluten does not pass into the distallate, there is no gluten in the mash in the first place.

There is a huge facility in Muscatine, Iowa, that processes corn into ethyl alcohol for Smirnoff, among others. Read here about Grain Processing Corporation. They also make other products from corn, including a well known brand of corn oil, and the World's Best Cat Litter.

Thanks Pete

Interesting link, wish I could get a tour of the facilities. I heard something saying that corn is at an all time high in terms of production. Everyone must be going gluten free!

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Thanks Pete

Interesting link, wish I could get a tour of the facilities. I heard something saying that corn is at an all time high in terms of production. Everyone must be going gluten free!

I believe all smirnoff is made with malt, especially the ones with flavor and the orginal one too. I have read all the ones at the grocery store for my husband who has celiac and he can't have any of them.

Sue

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I was referring to the vodka.

There are a number of other beverages which carry the Smirnoff brand. Some of these may be made with malt. In some cases, the same name may refer to different products in different states, due to varying tax laws. Smirnoff vodka is a corn-based spirit, no matter where you buy it. But the "coolers" could be vodka based, or not, depending on the state in which they are sold. Some states tax coolers made from distilled spirits at a much higher rate than non-distilled ones; in these states coolers may be fermented without distillation.

In Canada, all Smirnoff-branded products are gluten free.

I regret any confusion that my post caused.

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Smirnoff Ice in the USA is a malted beverage whereas in Canada it is not. So, in Canada it is gluten-free, but in the USA it is not gluten-free.

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Just to clarify as this thread is somewhat confusing:

In the USA,

Smirnoff Vodkas - Gluten Free

Smirnoff Ice (malted beverage sold in six packs of 12oz bottles) - NOT GLUTEN FREE

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Just to clarify as this thread is somewhat confusing:

In the USA,

Smirnoff Vodkas - Gluten Free

Smirnoff Ice (malted beverage sold in six packs of 12oz bottles) - NOT GLUTEN FREE

I found this interesting, I emailed the smirnoff company yesterday and today they emailed back stating that smirnoff and smirnoff ice IS GLUTEN FREE and they knew I was emailing them from Ohio.

Now that is confussing. So my husband who has celiac is going to give the smirnoff ice a try and see if he gets sick from it or not, that really is the only true way for him to find out.

Sue

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As I posted previously, some products vary in their content from state to state. Smirnoff Ice is vodka-based in some states. I don't know which ones. In other states it is malt-based. If in doubt, don't.

Reasons may include different tax levels, or the requirement to be sold only in a liquor store versus a corner store. Each state has its own alcoholic beverage laws, and these cause things to be made differently to comply with state law.

Check carefully regarding which version is sold in your state.

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You might want to check out Luksusova Vodka. It's made from potatoes and it's not too expensive. Check out their web site it talks all about Celiac Disease.

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Is Smirnoff gluten free?

The Ice product line is made from malt. This is a barley that has sprouted some. Natural and artificial flavors are added to the malt to form the wine cooler.

Barley and malt, which is usually made from barley, malt syrup, malt extract, malt flavoring and malt vinegar. These are "not" gluten free. Just tought you might like to know this bit of info ;)

So, your answer ia no...It is "NOT" Gluten free.

Sammyjo

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This discussion is over 5 years old. Any info discussed that long ago about a product may be out of date.

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I've read from people that it's corn, but on the bottles of vodka, it says grain..... So I don't chance it. I drink Vikingsford, Luksovosa, or any other potato based ones. Ciroc is grape based and Titos is corn based.

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It drives me nuts that Smirnoff just lists "grain". Everything I have read seems to indicate it is made from corn, and while corn is a grain, it makes me uncomfortable enough that I drink Smirnoff much less that I would if I was sure it was naturally gluten free. I think it is really odd that Smirnoff never actually states what they make it from on the bottle or anywhere on their website, at least not that I can find. It's quite disappointing to me since Smirnoff is very popular and would be easier than the others to order at bars.

Apparently, it isn't totally uncommon to do this as this wikipedia page just lists "grain" for several vodkas. Interestingly, there are many naturally gluten free mashes on the list: potato, corn, honey, sugar cane, fruits, coconut, grape, and muscadine.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_vodkas

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It drives me nuts that Smirnoff just lists "grain". Everything I have read seems to indicate it is made from corn, and while corn is a grain, it makes me uncomfortable enough that I drink Smirnoff much less that I would if I was sure it was naturally gluten free. I think it is really odd that Smirnoff never actually states what they make it from on the bottle or anywhere on their website, at least not that I can find. It's quite disappointing to me since Smirnoff is very popular and would be easier than the others to order at bars.

Smirnoff is made from corn. Even if you don't believe that gluten does not pass into the distallate, there is no gluten in the mash in the first place.

There is a huge facility in Muscatine, Iowa, that processes corn into ethyl alcohol for Smirnoff, among others. Read here about Grain Processing Corporation. They also make other products from corn, including a well known brand of corn oil, and the World's Best Cat Litter.

I posted that over five years ago. It was true then, and it is true now. If you don't believe me, then that is up to you. BTW, it is Mazola that they make.

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I posted that over five years ago. It was true then, and it is true now. If you don't believe me, then that is up to you. BTW, it is Mazola that they make.

Thanks, psawyer. That's very helpful. I'll drink Smirnoff more confidently now!

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