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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

My Experiment
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8 posts in this topic

I have been on a strict gluten free diet for over a year.

Before I was diagnosed with celiac disease, I had no symptoms ever.

Yesterday I ate two slices of papa john's pizza. I had a slight stomach discomfort, but overall everything was fine.

I was just interested to see exactly what would happen.

Obviously, I am going to stay on my strict diet.

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While you're still eating gluten, your symptoms are generally less severe than after you've been on the diet a few months and then get sick again. This is because when your body constantly deals with gluten, it gets....used to it. After your body has been flushed of it, it reacts more violently to the gluten since the protein has once again become a rather foreign substance.

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i've tested myself with everything imaginable almost, to see how much pain I feel and how long I suffer for depending on how much I ate..keep a log of it..so that when I do have my monthly cheat, I know what to stay away from..

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:( lisa--as a friend, i am reminding you that we cant cheat, the word being CANT--every time you cheat you do damage to your body--its not like cheating on a diet--some diets will tell you if you cheat, its ok, but jump right back on the band wagon--BUT with celiacs, you cant cheat--diabetics can have a little sugar, but we CANT have gluten in any shape or form--please dont cheat on purpose--we care about you :D deb
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whose lisa..

that was the first time i've ever cheated on the diet, i didn't want to see how much pain i had, rather i wanted some pizza lol.

i am goign to stay on the diet no matter what

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i've tested myself with everything imaginable almost, to see how much pain I feel and how long I suffer for depending on how much I ate..keep a log of it..so that when I do have my monthly cheat, I know what to stay away from..

Do realize that cheating monthly puts your risk of developing intestinal cancers and other autoimmune diseases and dying early right back up to that of untreated celiacs.

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whose lisa..

Num1HabsFan

And Lisa....if you're eating gluten once a month, then the gluten-free diet is doing very little good for your body, anyway. Eating just the tiniest bit of gluten completely offsets the progress you've made during that month. The only positive thing is that there is less gluten entering your system, but it will still cause the same long-term symptoms: osteoporosis, cancers, etc. so it's not worth it!

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