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What Kind Of Pizza Crust Do You Use?
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I've been using Gluten Free Pantry's pizza crust mix for months now. At first it was ok, you know, "This isn't too bad" thing. My kids eat it fine, although they mourn the loss of Pizza Hut and Papa John's. I've gotten some pretty good methods and techniques down pat, and I use a high quality pizza stone.

But the gluten-free Pantry mix has become immensely unsatisfying to me! It falls into a gluten-free category I call "Nasty Biscuits." Think dense, dry, and crumbly. I came up with this category the first time I actually choked on a piece of gluten-free bread. :o

Please tell me that there is a gluten-free pizza crust out there that is somewhat crispy/chewy???

Please, everyone post your favorites. Thanks in advance!

-Sarah

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So far Kinnikinnick crusts are the only one that my family has liked. They are chewy, and they are a little sweet since they are made with sweet rice flour. To make mine crisp, I rub some olive oil on the pan before I pre-bake it. (I did not care for Gluten Free Pantry crust either.)

Please share any pizza tips you may have! :)

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Before I had to go corn-free, I ate Kinnikinnick. I loooooooved those things.

Now we eat Carol Fenster's recipe for gluten-free pizza crusts. My husband likes this recipe way better than any gluten recipe and my sister exclaimed that it "tasted like real pizza!"

Plus it's super easy to make. Definitely a plus.

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I use the recipe from Bette Hagman called Seasoned Pizza Crust. My family LOVES it, too. We also really like the Kinnickick crust, but we can't really afford it, especially w/ 6 ppl in this family!

ptkds

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We purchased some by the new company "Out of the Breadbox" last night at Vitamin Cottage and we'll be eating them sometime this week. We haven't really tried any store-bought crusts since DD was dxd. I miss pizza.

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Please tell me that there is a gluten-free pizza crust out there that is somewhat crispy/chewy???

Please, everyone post your favorites. Thanks in advance!

-Sarah

Hi Sarah,

I make my own as I couldn't eat the 'cardboard stuff' they pass off as pizza base!

.

These are quite easy to make and taste really nice, it means baking it from scratch,

no mixes allowed here.

.

Follow the links:

.

Pizza Crust like you wouldn't believe: !!

.

Best Homemade Pizza Sauce Ever : !!

.

.

Hope this is of some help.

Best Regards,

David

.

.

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We've experimented with a few different recipes and my favorite one so far has to be the pizza crust from Annalise Roberts book, Gluten Free Baking Classics. It's absolutely delicious.

And for sauce, I like the Don Pepino's, which you can find in any supermarket. It comes in a yellow can. I top it with fresh mozzarella and YUM!

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I use Don Pepino's too and it makes ALL the difference in the final product!

We've experimented with a few different recipes and my favorite one so far has to be the pizza crust from Annalise Roberts book, Gluten Free Baking Classics. It's absolutely delicious.

And for sauce, I like the Don Pepino's, which you can find in any supermarket. It comes in a yellow can. I top it with fresh mozzarella and YUM!

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I have tried Betty Hagman's and Carol Fenster's and like Carol Fenster's recipe the best by far. It is from her book Cooking Free. The one that uses yeast. I saw someone else posted that they use her recipe too. The one I use doesn't use milk powder though. The book doesn't look like much but the recipes are amazing! I also made crackers from her book and they tasted great! Way better then the ones that are in the store.

I've been using Gluten Free Pantry's pizza crust mix for months now. At first it was ok, you know, "This isn't too bad" thing. My kids eat it fine, although they mourn the loss of Pizza Hut and Papa John's. I've gotten some pretty good methods and techniques down pat, and I use a high quality pizza stone.

But the gluten-free Pantry mix has become immensely unsatisfying to me! It falls into a gluten-free category I call "Nasty Biscuits." Think dense, dry, and crumbly. I came up with this category the first time I actually choked on a piece of gluten-free bread. :o

Please tell me that there is a gluten-free pizza crust out there that is somewhat crispy/chewy???

Please, everyone post your favorites. Thanks in advance!

-Sarah

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If you are looking for a quick fix (already made) we use Foods by George frozen shells.They sell these at WHole Foods.

We to like Carol Fenster's or Annalise' recipe the best.

Jillian, what market do you find Don Pepino's sauce? I haven't been able to find it...

mamaw

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Cause Your Special has a really really awesome pizza crust mix...

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Jillian, what market do you find Don Pepino's sauce? I haven't been able to find it...

mamaw

I can find it at any regular supermarket. Stop n' Shop, Pathmark, A&P, etc. I'm not positive that it is in the isle with all the other pasta sauces though. Next time I'm in the supermarket I'll take note what isle it's in and let you know. I kinda want to say it's where you find tomato paste or maybe closer to the pasta than the sauces...

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Thank you all sooooo much for your replies! I have lots of options now. I think we'll be having a lot of pizza in the future, as I try these out. But hey, I'm one of those people that believe pizza is a health food. B)

I will probably try the from-scratch recipes first...

David, one question about your crust recipe...

Caster sugar-- this is very fine granulated sugar, right? Does it have a one-to-one substitution ratio with American "standard" granulated sugar? I'm betting it probably does, but just in case, I thought I should ask.

Thank you again, everyone. No one should have to settle for pizza with grody crust ;)

-Sarah

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I forgot to say half of what I intended to :lol:

Jenny,

I think you've told me before that your family really loves the Kinnikinnick crust, but unfortunately I still haven't been able to find it anywhere... I think I'm going to have to order some to try! As for pizza tips, well I'm no expert, but there are a couple things that I personally have come to believe are "musts." One of them is a high quality pizza stone. IMO, it doesn't have to cost an arm and a leg, but you want one that is guaranteed to be 100% pure clay, otherwise it might have other filler-type junk in it. I actually really love Pampered Chef's line of stone bakeware. The other thing I've come to believe is that, the more tomatoey the sauce, the better. Whatever you do, don't use spaghetti sauce. :o There is something very strange that happens to sauce once it's labeled for spaghetti. I don't know quite what it is, but... Anyway, I like to start with PLAIN tomato sauce (found with the diced canned tomatoes) and work from there adding to it. Like you, I also use olive oil on the crust, and I'll also sprinkle a little garlic salt and an Italian season blend. I also bake the crust a bit before I start adding sauce and toppings.

I have to say, I've never heard of Don Pepino's sauce. It may be a regional thing, because we don't have any of those grocery stores listed, here in North Carolina! :huh: That is too bad! Is it really tomatoey?

I think I'm going to try out David's recipe for sauce, too.

-Sarah

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I crave pizza often, and it has been really hard for not having Pizza Hut as it is my faovorite.

I have to say though that "Chebe" is a new close second as my favorite, and not just because it's gluten free and I have to. I make it all the time for my family and friends and they LOVE it!!!

You can order it at the Gluten free mall, and check out all their products at www.chebe.com. I also love their breadsticks, all purpose bread mix and cinnamon mix.

They are all wonderful and reasonably priced!

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Thank you all sooooo much for your replies! I have lots of options now. I think we'll be having a lot of pizza in the future, as I try these out. But hey, I'm one of those people that believe pizza is a health food. B)

I will probably try the from-scratch recipes first...

David, one question about your crust recipe...

Caster sugar-- this is very fine granulated sugar, right? Does it have a one-to-one substitution ratio with American "standard" granulated sugar? I'm betting it probably does, but just in case, I thought I should ask.

Thank you again, everyone. No one should have to settle for pizza with grody crust ;)

-Sarah

Hi Sarah,

Yes you are right it is 'standard American granulated sugar'.

.

Let me know what you think ?

.

I've sent you a PM. (private message)

.

Best Regards,

David

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Ok I am hungry for Pizza now!!!

I like Amy's rice crust pizza, but I will try this weekend Kinninnick, they will last me a while since I am the only one in the house that eats Gluten free.

donna

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The Bravo rest. chain is trying out Kinnickinnick pizza crust .They have a big gluten-free menu. I tried the pizza crust & to me it tasted way to sweet & more like a bisquick type crust . When I have pizza I want the real deal in the crust not bisquick.

Maybe I'm the only one who doesn't like K. pizza crust?

mamaw

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This is the crust I like, and I have to fight my gluten-eating kids to get a piece for myself:

gluten-free Pizza Crust

1 packet yeast (about 1 tablespoon)

3/4 cup buttermilk, room temperature (if casein-free, use rice milk with 1 tsp cider vinegar)

1/2 cup potato starch

3/4 cup cornstarch

1/4 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoons baking powder

1 tablespoon xanthan gum

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i was desperate for something like a pizza crust the other day, and i've got these english muffins from Glutino that i love. so i slapped on some toppings and put them in my toaster oven! turned out GREAT!!! nice crunchy taste!

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Hi!

This recipe was floating around on a thread on this forum a while back. My family loves it (even the gluten eating ones). But when in a hurry we have started using chebe as well and it is just as good. In order to make it a little more like a wheat crust I add 2 Tablespoons of pamela's baking mix and about 2 tablespoons of flax meal (cuz I put it in just about everything! :D ). Then add enough milk to make it intoa dough - following the other directions on the package. Excellent! and so easy.

Here is the other recipe (an I added flax meal to this one too - really, try it, it's good!)

NY Style Pizza

Makes one 16" crust or two smaller crusts - foldable floppy and not crispy.

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons rapid rise yeast

1 1/3 cup warm milk

1 teaspoon sugar

1 1/3 cup brown rice flour

1 cup tapioca flour

1 teaspoons xanthan gum

1 teaspoon salt

2 teaspoons unflavored gelatin powder

2 teaspoons dried Italian seasoning

2 teaspoons olive oil

2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar

Directions:

Preheat oven to 425F degrees. In a small bowl, dissolve yeast and sugar in warm milk. In a separate larger bowl, blend together dry ingredients. Stir in yeast mixture to dry ingredient mixture. Add oil and apple cider vinegar. Mix well.

Grease and flour the pizza pan (just like you grease and flour a cake pan). Pat down dough on pan - sprinkle top of dough with flour so dough doesn't stick to your hands as you're shaping pizza. Bake plain un-topped crust for 15 minutes. Remove from oven and add toppings.

Return to oven and bake for another 10 minutes.

Tip: I put plastic wrap over dough and then roll out with small rolling pin (on pan) to avoid sticky dough.

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I use the same recipe as Fiddle Faddle except I just use regular milk. My whole family likes it.

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Hi Fiddle-Faddle

Do you think your crust recipe would work for calzones 0r stromboli????

I got a craving for a stromboli........

thanks

mamaw

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The Whole foods gluten free bakery crust is great. Also glutino frozen pizzas are great!!

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Hi Fiddle-Faddle

Do you think your crust recipe would work for calzones 0r stromboli????

I got a craving for a stromboli........

thanks

mamaw

You're giving me cravings now!!!! I'm gonna try it as calzones next time--I'll let you know if it works? (I don't see why it wouldn't.)

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