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Whey Protein Gluten Problem


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#1 abdab

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Posted 10 November 2007 - 03:02 PM

Whey protein is gluten free, but I have notice several manufacturers now include peptide bonded glutamine as an extra ingredient in their supplements which is apparently derived from hydrolysed wheat gluten.
Most manufacturers with the added peptide bonded glutamine do now not claim the whey protein as gluten free but I have noticed at least one who does.
I have emailed the manufacturers and await responses.
But does anybody out there know if this peptide bonded glutamine does contain gluten or has it been treated such that the gluten content is removed ?
This stuff is appearing in lots of protein supplements that would previously have been gluten free.
Any thoughts??
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#2 ewalton

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Posted 12 November 2007 - 02:59 PM

Glutamine is one of the amino acids (building blocks of proteins- see http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Glutamine) and isn't actually related to gluten, even though they sound similar.

"peptide bonded" is also a bit of a confusing phrase. A "peptide bond" is the way 2 amino acids stick together. So peptide bonded glutamine just means "we added extra glutamine, and it's attached the way it usually is".

I never knew my college chemistry classes would be so useful.

-Em
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#3 abdab

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Posted 13 November 2007 - 12:28 PM

Glutamine is one of the amino acids (building blocks of proteins- see http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Glutamine) and isn't actually related to gluten, even though they sound similar.

"peptide bonded" is also a bit of a confusing phrase. A "peptide bond" is the way 2 amino acids stick together. So peptide bonded glutamine just means "we added extra glutamine, and it's attached the way it usually is".

I never knew my college chemistry classes would be so useful.

-Em


I dont have a problem with glutamine, just the peptide bonded glutamine.

Here are some quotes from a few articles:-

"Glutamine Peptide derives from wheat gluten and therefore appears brownish in color and may have an unpleasant taste"

"glutamine peptide (wheat gluten hydrolysate) in "

"Peptide Bonded Glutamine 800 mg. (as hydrolized wheat gluten)"

"Peptide Bonded Glutamine (as hydrolized wheat gluten)"

"Glutamine Peptide by definition is L-Glutamine, peptide bonded (a chemical bond between two amino acids) to another amino acid or several other amino acids in a chain (protein). Within the supplement industry Glutamine Peptide means . . . . wheat protein. What’s so great about wheat protein? It is about 37% Glutamine compared to whey protein, which averages between 6% to 10% Glutamine. "


This article explains the difference:
http://maxmuscle.com...ports_nutrition


So is it safe to eat or not?? It doesnt sound like it to me but I am still trying to get some clear answers from the 'experts'.
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#4 ewalton

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Posted 18 November 2007 - 05:09 PM

I should've know college chemistry wouldn't actually apply to the real world. You're absolutely right. I looked at some of the links you sent, and it looks like it does nearly always derive from wheat, at least in human food products- it's a wheat gluten hydrolysate. Supposedly it can be made gluten-free: http://www.freepaten...om/6692933.html

There is corn gluten hydrolysate, but the references to that are almost all about how it can be used as an herbicide.

I'd suggest calling the companies that claim that their supplements are gluten-free. Ask them where their peptide-bonded glutamine comes from, and if it's wheat, I'd ask for lab test results to confirm the gluten-free claim before eating any of it.

Or just finding a different supplement :(

-Em
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#5 georgie

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Posted 18 November 2007 - 07:22 PM

I have been using a whey based protein powder that is labelled gluten-free. I was worrying about the dairy content but now I have symptoms of a Glutening ( fatigue, constipation, headache). I will go and check the label !

(edited) YES - it has Glutamine Peptide. What does this mean? Have I been Glutening myself ?
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Diagnosed May 2006 - Hashimotos Thyroid after being diagnosed in 1977 and told it didn't matter.
Diagnosed June 2006 with adrenal insufficiency.
Diagnosed June 2006 as Gluten Intolerant after I failed the Challenge Diet. Negative blood test.No biopsy.
Diagnosed June 2006 as B12 low. Needed weekly injections for a year.Still have them every 2 weeks.
Trialled Dairy Free Diet and reacted positively to that challenge in January 07.
News Flash! Coeliac Genetic Testing done April 08 . DQ2 Positive !
Diagnosed July 2010 FODMAP. Limits on Fructose, lactose, polyols, fructans. NO ONION! But I can have hard cheese, butter and cream again!!!

#6 PDN

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Posted 23 November 2007 - 08:39 AM

Whey protein is gluten free, but I have notice several manufacturers now include peptide bonded glutamine as an extra ingredient in their supplements which is apparently derived from hydrolysed wheat gluten.
Most manufacturers with the added peptide bonded glutamine do now not claim the whey protein as gluten free but I have noticed at least one who does.
I have emailed the manufacturers and await responses.
But does anybody out there know if this peptide bonded glutamine does contain gluten or has it been treated such that the gluten content is removed ?
This stuff is appearing in lots of protein supplements that would previously have been gluten free.
Any thoughts??

Stear clear of proteins that contain glutamine peptides as in most cases they are derived from wheat. Your top quality proteins such as isolates still have peptides in them and are therefore not gluten free. Be cautious with weight gainers also. I'm researching protein powders to be sure they are safe enough for people with Celiac Disease. ;)
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Pete & Elaine :)

#7 abdab

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Posted 24 November 2007 - 02:32 AM

Stear clear of proteins that contain glutamine peptides as in most cases they are derived from wheat. Your top quality proteins such as isolates still have peptides in them and are therefore not gluten free. Be cautious with weight gainers also. I'm researching protein powders to be sure they are safe enough for people with Celiac Disease. ;)


Yes I think that any supplements with glutamine peptide, or peptide bonded glutamine, should be avoided. I also agree with the caution with weight gainers as most of these seem to contain gluten.

I have had limited success in getting replies from manufacturers. The manufactuer with the protein supposedly containing glutamine peptide and claiming it to be gluen free has replied to state that their distributor had made an error in their advertising and that there was no glutamine peptide in the powder and it was gluten free.

You say you are researching protein powders. What sort of research?? Do you mean your own investigations or do you mean scientific research??
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#8 yolo

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Posted 24 November 2007 - 01:59 PM

Hi,

I just noticed your L-glutamine controversy. This worries me since it has seemed like L-glutamine has helped me considerably.

However the kind I use is pure--not with an energy bar or anything else. Its pharmaceutical grade and says its gluten, wheat, soy, milk, sugar etc. free. Its called Essential Glutmine Powder by Iron Tek. Taking the pure powder its pretty inexpensive and supposedly more effective.

I take it at night just before I go to bed and often first thing in the morning on an empty stomach with co-enzyme B vitamins and bromelain/papain and nattokinase (these last for the fibronilytic/anti-scar tissue effect--important for the gut as well as scar tissue elsewhere as well as thickening arteries etc.). It seems to give me more energy and I at least thought it helps heal the gut. I've also read L-glutamine naturally helps kick in more anti-aging hormones. I have noticed no ill effect.

Any comments??

--Yolo
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Diagnosed celiac sprue as infant: failure to thrive & pneumonia-back on grains age 4. Began herbs 1971 combating chronic kidney disease/general ill health 1973. Avoid wheat family and "allergens" by 1980. Late 80's doc. diagnosed candida: cave-man diet. Diagnosed degraded myelin sheath 2006; need co-enzyme B vitamins. Discovered celiac fall 2007; finally told diagnosis as infant. Recently found I am salicylic acid intolerant. Ironically can't tolerate most herbs now. Can now eat brown rice & other gluten-free grains (except corn) & even maple syrup & now homeopathic medicine works! Am still exploring the shape of this elephant but I've made progress!

#9 johnsoniu

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 10:58 AM

Hi,

I just noticed your L-glutamine controversy. This worries me since it has seemed like L-glutamine has helped me considerably.

However the kind I use is pure--not with an energy bar or anything else. Its pharmaceutical grade and says its gluten, wheat, soy, milk, sugar etc. free. Its called Essential Glutmine Powder by Iron Tek. Taking the pure powder its pretty inexpensive and supposedly more effective.

I take it at night just before I go to bed and often first thing in the morning on an empty stomach with co-enzyme B vitamins and bromelain/papain and nattokinase (these last for the fibronilytic/anti-scar tissue effect--important for the gut as well as scar tissue elsewhere as well as thickening arteries etc.). It seems to give me more energy and I at least thought it helps heal the gut. I've also read L-glutamine naturally helps kick in more anti-aging hormones. I have noticed no ill effect.

Any comments??

--Yolo


To further muddy up the discussion, I found this reference that says L-glutamine and peptide bonded glutamine are not the same thing.

http://www.criticalb...ment-Review.htm

I agree that we should steer clear of anything containing peptide bonded glutamine, but pure form L-glutamine should be fine. I think the article listed above has a link for the L-glutamine powder that says on its label it is gluten free.

Sigh, this all used to be sooo much easier B)
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John


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#10 abdab

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Posted 28 November 2007 - 01:34 PM

L-Glutamine is glutamine which is gluten free.

It is the glutamine peptide, or peptide bonded glutamine, which should be avoided.
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#11 yolo

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Posted 28 November 2007 - 06:05 PM

L-Glutamine is glutamine which is gluten free.

It is the glutamine peptide, or peptide bonded glutamine, which should be avoided.



Thank heavens!

Has anyone else noticed how the L-Glutamine helps the gut and boosts the hormonal and muscular systems--as well as lessens sugar cravings?

--Yolo
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Diagnosed celiac sprue as infant: failure to thrive & pneumonia-back on grains age 4. Began herbs 1971 combating chronic kidney disease/general ill health 1973. Avoid wheat family and "allergens" by 1980. Late 80's doc. diagnosed candida: cave-man diet. Diagnosed degraded myelin sheath 2006; need co-enzyme B vitamins. Discovered celiac fall 2007; finally told diagnosis as infant. Recently found I am salicylic acid intolerant. Ironically can't tolerate most herbs now. Can now eat brown rice & other gluten-free grains (except corn) & even maple syrup & now homeopathic medicine works! Am still exploring the shape of this elephant but I've made progress!

#12 PDN

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Posted 01 December 2007 - 09:46 AM

Thank heavens!

Has anyone else noticed how the L-Glutamine helps the gut and boosts the hormonal and muscular systems--as well as lessens sugar cravings?

--Yolo


Just so you know L-Glutamine helps the body repair, our bodies simply do not produce enough of it, and even less as we age.....this is why it's been helping. By you taking it at night is the best thing you can do for yourself, as the body naturally repairs itself while we sleep. Cudo's to you!

Now as for sugar craving??? Couldn't tell ya, you might be getting less craving due to your diet and eating patterns? As for boosting the muscular system and hormonal system - how long has it been since you got a cold or flu, while taking L-Glutamine???? Probably been a while as it also boost your immune system!

Keep up the good work - stay healthy!
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Pete & Elaine :)

#13 PDN

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Posted 28 January 2008 - 02:40 PM

If you're looking for a safe gluten-free whey protein to drink try EAS. They are one of the very few products on the market that are completely gluten-free. I have personally checked this out for a client who has celiac disease.

Another safe protein - a gainer style protein shake that is completely gluten free is Ultimate Nutrition's Muscle Juice. All flavours are safe for celiac patients and people whom prefer a gluten-free healthy lifestyle.

All the best,
Elaine and Peter
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Pete & Elaine :)

#14 printmaker81

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Posted 09 February 2008 - 10:58 AM

I'm so happy I found this thread!! I switched back to being a vegetarian last summer and have been taking supplements. I thought I was feeling crappy because my stomach wasn't used to them or something. No...glutamine peptide is the culprit. Thanks for the tips on the muscle milk and EAS...I'm switching over.
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#15 pabstj

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Posted 30 January 2009 - 06:48 PM

If you're looking for a safe gluten-free whey protein to drink try EAS. They are one of the very few products on the market that are completely gluten-free. I have personally checked this out for a client who has celiac disease.

Another safe protein - a gainer style protein shake that is completely gluten free is Ultimate Nutrition's Muscle Juice. All flavours are safe for celiac patients and people whom prefer a gluten-free healthy lifestyle.

All the best,
Elaine and Peter



You can also add bioplex to that list.
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