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Whey Protein Gluten Problem
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39 posts in this topic

If you're looking for a safe gluten-free whey protein to drink try EAS. They are one of the very few products on the market that are completely gluten-free. I have personally checked this out for a client who has celiac disease.

Another safe protein - a gainer style protein shake that is completely gluten free is Ultimate Nutrition's Muscle Juice. All flavours are safe for celiac patients and people whom prefer a gluten-free healthy lifestyle.

All the best,

Elaine and Peter

I realize this post is 2 years old, so I'm assuming Ultimate Nutrition's Muscle Juice probably changed their formula. According to their product information listing on a dealer's site, this product contains the peptide bonded glutamine, and would therefore be suspect (quote and website source below). Does anyone use this product and have up to date info on whether or not it's gluten-free? Seems like a good product if it is.

Source: http://www6.netrition.com/ultimate_nutrition_muscle_juice_revolution_2600.html

"....In addition to the precursors to glutamine present in this protein, you get 1000 mg of glutamine per serving which includes the breakthrough L-Alanyl-L-Glutamine. This powerful dipeptide may protect against muscle degradation and provides fuel for exercise to help you go the distance."

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For those who can't or don't want to consume dairy, there are pea protein powders on the market. For example, NOW Foods makes a pure pea protein powder, with nothing else added at all. It actually has more L-Glutamine than the whey powders I compared it too. It does have a legume smell, but so far doesn't seem to foul up the things I've put it in.

I'm not convinced that L-Glutamine works for everyone. I actually did try it, but stopped taking it because my gut let me know it wasn't happy with it. Although at the time I may have still been getting CC from something. I still have the bottle, so maybe I'll try it again. You can be sure I'll post about the results if there's anything to report.

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If you're looking for a safe gluten-free whey protein to drink try EAS. They are one of the very few products on the market that are completely gluten-free. I have personally checked this out for a client who has celiac disease.

Another safe protein - a gainer style protein shake that is completely gluten free is Ultimate Nutrition's Muscle Juice. All flavours are safe for celiac patients and people whom prefer a gluten-free healthy lifestyle.

All the best,

Elaine and Peter

EAS has Oats in it (they claim to be certified gluten free) but it tore me up every-time, I remember the top of my brain feeling like moosh and getting cramped up. I had to stop taking this in college because it was essentially kryptonite. :( If you're an athlete beware.

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It is useful to update this information as a user beware; however, this is an old post and the poster is probably no longer around.

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I realize this post is 2 years old, so I'm assuming Ultimate Nutrition's Muscle Juice probably changed their formula. According to their product information listing on a dealer's site, this product contains the peptide bonded glutamine, and would therefore be suspect (quote and website source below). Does anyone use this product and have up to date info on whether or not it's gluten-free? Seems like a good product if it is.

Source: http://www6.netrition.com/ultimate_nutrition_muscle_juice_revolution_2600.html

"....In addition to the precursors to glutamine present in this protein, you get 1000 mg of glutamine per serving which includes the breakthrough L-Alanyl-L-Glutamine. This powerful dipeptide may protect against muscle degradation and provides fuel for exercise to help you go the distance."

Even if there is l-alanyl and l- Glycin in there, it doesnt mean that this aminos r gained from wheat. It also can be gained from whey, as my research was right.

I asked the manufacturer about gluten in there weight gainers and they claimed - even if it seemed to be an automated mail - their gainers (w/o cookies) r gluten free.

Im still scared, but i rly want such weight gainer to get some weight/muscles...

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The l-analyl is gained from fermented glucose. So I think its gluten free.

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Wow. I will have to find out more about this because my boyfriend has been taking this for quite awhile now.

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I think there is some confusion between glutamine and gluten. It is a common mistake. There is no suggestion on the website or nutritional labeling that the product contains any sort of gluten.

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You can also add bioplex to that list.

For the people looking for more choices in gluten free whey protein powder, I found this certain "International Protein: Amino charged API". Their website says

"No Gluten

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I'm a bit late to this discussion but I am currently using Prolab N-Large 3. It seems to work well for me. It does contain soy derivatives (I believe the maltodextrin) but causes no reaction for me. An added bonus is that it's sold in 10 lb tubs. (Tubs come in handy for gardening when the powder is gone! It also tastes good.

I had hit a critical point where I absolutely had to up my protein and caloric intake.

Meanwhile, too many protein powders/drinks contain Creatine and I prefer to avoid that. This doesn't have it. Creatine is what leads to what body builders refer to as "protein farts".

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Bumping this thread up because I believe a recent glutening may have happened as a result of a new protein powder I was trying, but trying to piece together knowledge from this thread to see if that would be something possible.

 

The brand is Whole Foods "100% Grass Fed Whey Protein Chocolate Flavor". These are the ingredients:

 

"Whey protien concentrate, cocoa powder**, natural chocolate flavor, natural vanilla flavor, xanthan gum, stevia extract, lo han guo fruit extract, whey protein isolate.

 

**Fair trade certified.

 

Contains milk ingredients. Produced in a facility that processes tree nuts, eggs,and soy."

 

 

So, because it's not the top quality of protein (it wasn't that expensive) there's no breakdown of what the proteins are made up of. I was naiive and assumed that whey would be gluten free...then read this thread. I checked Whole Foods' gluten free product list and it's NOT on there. Obviously I should have checked BEFORE but I thought I was safe.

 

I had this stuff 3 days in a row and definitely felt "glutened" but I'm not sure if it's possibly from this or something else (went grocery shopping and decided to get gluten-free oats as well, not sure if it was the powder or the oats). Still figuring out how sensitive I am, a year and a half after dx... any chance they could have whey peptides or anything like that in there without having to label it?

 

THANKS!

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Bumping this thread up because I believe a recent glutening may have happened as a result of a new protein powder I was trying, but trying to piece together knowledge from this thread to see if that would be something possible.

 

The brand is Whole Foods "100% Grass Fed Whey Protein Chocolate Flavor". These are the ingredients:

 

"Whey protien concentrate, cocoa powder**, natural chocolate flavor, natural vanilla flavor, xanthan gum, stevia extract, lo han guo fruit extract, whey protein isolate.

 

**Fair trade certified.

 

Contains milk ingredients. Produced in a facility that processes tree nuts, eggs,and soy."

 

 

So, because it's not the top quality of protein (it wasn't that expensive) there's no breakdown of what the proteins are made up of. I was naiive and assumed that whey would be gluten free...then read this thread. I checked Whole Foods' gluten free product list and it's NOT on there. Obviously I should have checked BEFORE but I thought I was safe.

 

I had this stuff 3 days in a row and definitely felt "glutened" but I'm not sure if it's possibly from this or something else (went grocery shopping and decided to get gluten-free oats as well, not sure if it was the powder or the oats). Still figuring out how sensitive I am, a year and a half after dx... any chance they could have whey peptides or anything like that in there without having to label it?

 

THANKS!

 

 

They have labelled that they contain whey - but whey is milk not gluten.

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They have labelled that they contain whey - but whey is milk not gluten.

Yes Kareng---however the rest of the posts on this thread are about how some whey is bound with certain peptides and may not be gluten-free after all. So I'm wondering about this as I definitely have glutening symptoms..

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Yes Kareng---however the rest of the posts on this thread are about how some whey is bound with certain peptides and may not be gluten-free after all. So I'm wondering about this as I definitely have glutening symptoms..

 

 

If you are talking about glutamate or glutamine - those are not gluten.

 

Bottom line - if you think a product or food makes you feel bad, no matter what the reason - don't eat it!

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