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Enzyme Cure
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Future Enzyme Treatment Possible for People with Celiac Disease  See your ad here!

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J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2004 May 13

Piper JL, Gray GM, Khosla C. Stanford University.

Celiac.com 11/28/2004 - A study by researchers at Stanford University looked at the ability of Prolyl endopeptidase (PEP)--a specific type of enzyme--to break down gliadin peptides in a living organism--rats. In an effort to determine whether a resistance to the break down of proteins by proteases enzymes is the cause of toxicity of the Pro- and Gln-rich peptides, the scientists analyzed the digestive resistance of a panel of alpha and gamma-gliadin peptides that are believed to induce gluten toxicity--all of which happen to be very resistant to gastric and pancreatic protease digestion--but can be broken down by intestinal brush border peptidases. The researchers determined that supplementation of PEP substantially reduced the concentrations of these peptides, and they determined a pharmacologically useful PEP dosage. According to the researchers:

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Read the last line. It says MAY be able to treat... This is still along way from being a definite treatment (and it's definitely NOT a cure of any kind -- with a cure you simply no longer have the disease or condition).

richard

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Please don't call it a cure. It's in no way related to a cure any more than shaving is a cure for whiskers.

As far as how to get some - the 1st step is to become a rat. It's only been tried on rats.

I was w/ Dr Gray just yesterday and he did say i may be a candidate for future testing, but don't forget this study is related only to gliadin - not secalinin or hordein (rye, barley) or the other grains' prolamine fractions.

While it's nice to be hopeful, i'd suggest finding a way to temper your impatience.

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Based on that study synposis, I'm taking a guess that we're at least 10 years away from production - IFF a company decides to go to production with it. They need to do further animal studies, human safety studies, human efficacy studies, and get it past the FDA - all assuming there's a manufacturer who wants to make it.

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