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Wheat Starch


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14 replies to this topic

#1 JodiC

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 08:14 AM

Hi,

I'm sure this has been asked already but I don't get on too often. What is the deal with Wheat Starch in foods? Is it safe for us or not? I noticed that alot of previously safe food have now added this but do not claim the wheat in the allergen label.
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#2 blueeyedmanda

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 08:25 AM

Hi,
Wheat starch is bad....sorry.
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#3 cruelshoes

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    We've heard nothing at all about the growing tomato menace..

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 08:32 AM

http://www.csaceliac...uten_grains.php

WHEAT starch By-product of WHEAT processing. Cannot be guaranteed to be 100% gluten-free. Sometimes added to food items during processing. No form of WHEAT starch is considered appropriate for a zero tolerance level gluten-free diet in the United States and Canada. Codex WHEAT starch is considered gluten-free by some foreign governments. Gluten level must be 200ppm or less to be labeled as Codex WHEAT Starch [Europe].


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-Colleen
Dx 8/05 via bloodwork and biopsy (total villous atrophy)
13-year old son Dx 11/05 via bloodwork and biopsy
Daughters (16 and 5) have tested negative via bloodwork

A woman is like a tea bag - you never know how strong she is until she gets in hot water. - Eleanor Roosevelt

#4 gfp

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 08:33 AM

BAD BAD BAD ....


Food grade wheat starch is not particularly pure... its just what washes away from the wheat and bits of gluten get carried along and its 'food' so its not really important. I have had reactions to the much purer pharmaceutical grade wheat starch... used in some tablets as a binder/filler let alone food grade.
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Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt. (JC, De Bello Gallico Liber III/XVIII)

#5 larry mac

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 09:28 AM

.... What is the deal with Wheat Starch in foods? ....


Sometimes, in a misguided bout of false hope, I'll read some cereal box ingredients at the grocery store. You know the drill. Corn, good. Rice, good. Everythings looking OK until towards the end. Then there it is, wheat starch. Or malt flavoring, or simply wheat. You know since it's at the end, and based on weight, it's got to be a miniscule amount. Surely it couldn't be that critical to the formulation.

Seems like they just throw that stuff in there so as not to have to deal with us.

best regards, lm
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gluten-free 12-18-06

colonoscopy, upper GI
blood, urine, stool tests, prometheus panel
positive endoscopy/positive duodenal biopsies (severe villous atrophy, high intraepithelial lympocytes)
diagnosed celiac disease by Gastroenterologist Andrew R. Gottesman, 12-18-06

"Sobriety sucks. That's why they invented booze in the first place." Denis Leary - Rescue Me

Beware the chocolate of Chiapa


#6 gfp

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 11:00 AM

Sometimes, in a misguided bout of false hope, I'll read some cerial box ingredients at the grocery store. You know the drill. Corn, good. Rice, good. Everythings looking OK until towards the end. Then there it is, wheat starch. Or malt flavoring, or simply wheat. You know since it's at the end, and based on weight, it's got to be a miniscule amount. Surely it couldn't be that critical to the formulation.

Seems like they just throw that stuff in there so as not to have to deal with us.

best regards, lm

I guess its just short cut... and extremely cheap as its essentially a waste product.

I have to admit though, sometimes it FEELS like they just throw it in for good measure...
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Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt. (JC, De Bello Gallico Liber III/XVIII)

#7 blueeyedmanda

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 02:17 PM

Sometimes, in a misguided bout of false hope, I'll read some cerial box ingredients at the grocery store. You know the drill. Corn, good. Rice, good. Everythings looking OK until towards the end. Then there it is, wheat starch. Or malt flavoring, or simply wheat. You know since it's at the end, and based on weight, it's got to be a miniscule amount. Surely it couldn't be that critical to the formulation.

Seems like they just throw that stuff in there so as not to have to deal with us.

best regards, lm



I know....that bugs me! I get all happy looking at cereal and then at the end....I walk away disappointed :)
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~~~~Gluten Free since 9/2004~~~~~~


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#8 JodiC

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 08:09 PM

So they don't have to list it in the allergen warnings? Is it because it is listed in the ingredients? I'm so sick of these food companies messing up food. Additives, fillers, flavorings, etc........I'm tired of the fakeness of it all.
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#9 ravenwoodglass

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Posted 03 December 2007 - 04:53 AM

Sometimes, in a misguided bout of false hope, I'll read some cereal box ingredients at the grocery store. You know the drill. Corn, good. Rice, good. Everythings looking OK until towards the end. Then there it is, wheat starch. Or malt flavoring, or simply wheat. You know since it's at the end, and based on weight, it's got to be a miniscule amount. Surely it couldn't be that critical to the formulation.

Seems like they just throw that stuff in there so as not to have to deal with us.

best regards, lm


They do that so they can say the cereal is 'multigrain' cause that is sooooo very good for us. :angry:
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#10 cruelshoes

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    We've heard nothing at all about the growing tomato menace..

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Posted 03 December 2007 - 06:10 AM

So they don't have to list it in the allergen warnings? Is it because it is listed in the ingredients?


Companies are not required to have an allergen warning per-se. They are, however, required to include the "big 8" somewhere on their ingredient statement if it is added to the product. They can do this one of 2 ways:

In the list of ingredients, put the name of the food source of the major food allergen in parenthesis after the common or usual name of the ingredient when that name does not already appear in the ingredient statement.

-or-

Immediately after or adjacent to the list of ingredients, put the word "Contains" followed by the name of the food for each of the major food allergens present in the food’s ingredients.

Source: http://www.fns.usda....enFactSheet.pdf

I know how sad it is to pick up a new box of cereal and get ALMOST to the end of the ingredient list before finding the wheat or malt or whatever.

Pick up box
Turn wrist
read ingredients
yes yes yes yes yes yes! yes! no
Put back on shelf
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-Colleen
Dx 8/05 via bloodwork and biopsy (total villous atrophy)
13-year old son Dx 11/05 via bloodwork and biopsy
Daughters (16 and 5) have tested negative via bloodwork

A woman is like a tea bag - you never know how strong she is until she gets in hot water. - Eleanor Roosevelt

#11 NorthernElf

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Posted 03 December 2007 - 06:31 AM

Yep, wheat starch is bad.

I LOVE Tera chips - but watch out for the Mediterranean ones ! I glutened myself a couple of weeks ago at Costco. I bought what I thought was regular Tera chips and scarfed done a couple of handfuls driving to another store. Ugh - it was quick enough for me to check the ingredients when I stopped and there it was - wheat starch.

Hello gut cramps, sinus pain, etc.

Isn't a terrible feeling to know you just ate some wheat and knowing that shortly you're going to be feeling ill ?!?!??!??! :angry:
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#12 Guest_swezzan_*

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 04:50 PM

all the responses are sooooo right........It is horrible to know you are going to be sick and sometimes boy r u. not to mention your thinking process has slowed as well. :(
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#13 hathor

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Posted 19 December 2007 - 08:45 AM

Companies are not required to have an allergen warning per-se. They are, however, required to include the "big 8" somewhere on their ingredient statement if it is added to the product. They can do this one of 2 ways:

In the list of ingredients, put the name of the food source of the major food allergen in parenthesis after the common or usual name of the ingredient when that name does not already appear in the ingredient statement.

-or-

Immediately after or adjacent to the list of ingredients, put the word "Contains" followed by the name of the food for each of the major food allergens present in the food’s ingredients.

Source: http://www.fns.usda....enFactSheet.pdf

I know how sad it is to pick up a new box of cereal and get ALMOST to the end of the ingredient list before finding the wheat or malt or whatever.

Pick up box
Turn wrist
read ingredients
yes yes yes yes yes yes! yes! no
Put back on shelf


Remember that barley, rye and oats aren't in the big eight, only wheat is. So gluten can be hidden in "flavors," "colors" and such.

Also, the allergen labeling regulation currently only applies to food regulated by the FDA. Food regulated by the USDA has no such regulation yet. They've talked of making a consistent rule, but they haven't even started the rulemaking yet from what I can tell. They were only asked to do this over two years ago. People who eat USDA food (about everyone on this board, but not me B) ) need to know that they can't rely on FDA labeling regulations that do not apply to that food.

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McDougall diet (low fat vegan) since 6/00
Gluten free since 1/6/07
Soy free and completely casein and egg free since 2/15/07
Yeast free, on and off, since 3/1/07 -- I can't notice any difference one way or the other

Enterolab results -- 2/15/07
Fecal Antigliladin IgA 140 (Normal Range <10 units)
Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 50 (Normal Range <10 units)
Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 517 (Normal Range <300 units)
Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 127 (Normal Range <10 units)
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0501
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 06xx
Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (subtype 5,6)
Fecal anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA antibody 11 (Normal range <10 units)
Fecal Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (dietary yeast) IgA 11 (Normal range <10 units)
Fecal Anti-Soy IgA 119 (Normal Range < 10 units)

#14 Huntress

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 01:19 PM

I find the topic of wheat starch confusing given the following statement in this research publication. (It would appear that the researchers considered the wheat-starch based bread as gluten-free.):

Gluten-Free Bread from Sorghum: Quality Differences Among Hybrids

Tilman J. Schober,1–3 Manuela Messerschmidt,1,4 Scott R. Bean,5 Seok-Ho Park,5 and Elke K. Arendt1

...Substantially higher specific volumes were reported for gluten-free breads from wheat starch and soy protein
isolate plus xanthan gum (4.6 mL/g, Ranhotra et al 1975)...


http://www.ars.usda....rom Sorghum.pdf
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#15 JNBunnie1

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Posted 13 August 2012 - 12:23 PM

It's likely this research was done in a country where the govermnment has decreed wheat starch below a certain gluten ppm threshold is considered acceptable to a gluten free diet. Many of the residents of said countries would disagree.
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