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Is There A Real Problem With Cross-contamination In Dishes And Toasters?


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11 replies to this topic

#1 BRob66

 
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Posted 02 December 2007 - 03:57 PM

is purchasing separate items for the kitchen really necessary?
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Belinda
Recently diagnosed
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and dairy-free
Living in Canada

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#2 psawyer

 
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Posted 02 December 2007 - 04:08 PM

Welcome to our group.

Toasters are impossible to clean well enough, and crumbs fly around when the toaster pops up. They are not that expensive. Get a new one and use it exclusively for gluten-free items.

Dishes are not so clear. Good dishes with unscratched hard surfaces can be cleaned successfully. Scratched plastic is problematic. You just can't get the sticky gluten out of the scratches. This goes for non-stick pans which are not in pristine condition as well. Wooden cutting boards and spoons absorb gluten and again, you can't clean them well enough.

Cutlery and other utensils should be okay if thoroughly washed.

A dishwasher should be thorough enough on things that are not scratched and are non-porous.
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Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

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#3 mamaw

 
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Posted 02 December 2007 - 04:15 PM

I agree with Peter. When I'm away from home I do use the toasta bags,for us they are real lifesavers......... and stainless steel everything at home......

mamaw
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#4 BRob66

 
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Posted 02 December 2007 - 04:18 PM

Welcome to our group.

Toasters are impossible to clean well enough, and crumbs fly around when the toaster pops up. They are not that expensive. Get a new one and use it exclusively for gluten-free items.

Dishes are not so clear. Good dishes with unscratched hard surfaces can be cleaned successfully. Scratched plastic is problematic. You just can't get the sticky gluten out of the scratches. This goes for non-stick pans which are not in pristine condition as well. Wooden cutting boards and spoons absorb gluten and again, you can't clean them well enough.

Cutlery and other utensils should be okay if thoroughly washed.

A dishwasher should be thorough enough on things that are not scratched and are non-porous.


Thanks Peter,,,never thought of pourous plastics or wood boards. do u really get reactions from so little a thing?
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Belinda
Recently diagnosed
gluten-free,soy-free,wheat-free,egg-free
and dairy-free
Living in Canada

#5 jerseyangel

 
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Posted 02 December 2007 - 04:23 PM

Hi Belinda, and welcome to the board! :)

Yes, you can get a reaction--and slow your healing considerably- by continually getting cross contaminated. That tiny amount is enough to set the autoimmune response in motion.

In addition to the great advice above, you will also need a new collander--don't use one that has been used for wheat pasta.
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Patti


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#6 psawyer

 
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Posted 02 December 2007 - 04:27 PM

Thanks Peter,,,never thought of pourous plastics or wood boards. do u really get reactions from so little a thing?

Many people do. I don't really know about myself. The house is not completely gluten-free, but the cutting board and wooden spoons never come into contact with gluten-containing foods. I'm not going to try it, just to find out. :o

I suspect if I cut up a loaf of regular bread on the cutting board, there would be enough contamination to make problems for me. Gluten products here are pretty much limited to some packaged crackers and granola bars that my wife likes. They are stored on the bottom shelf in the pantry. None of the gluten-free stuff is ever placed on that shelf.
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Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

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#7 BRob66

 
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Posted 02 December 2007 - 04:35 PM

Many people do. I don't really know about myself. The house is not completely gluten-free, but the cutting board and wooden spoons never come into contact with gluten-containing foods. I'm not going to try it, just to find out. :o

I suspect if I cut up a loaf of regular bread on the cutting board, there would be enough contamination to make problems for me. Gluten products here are pretty much limited to some packaged crackers and granola bars that my wife likes. They are stored on the bottom shelf in the pantry. None of the gluten-free stuff is ever placed on that shelf.


That is great advice,,,thank you so much. i am still reacting slightly to things,but not enough to be on the Benadryl. I will definitely reorganize my kitchen. what are some of the different reactions, do u know?
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Belinda
Recently diagnosed
gluten-free,soy-free,wheat-free,egg-free
and dairy-free
Living in Canada

#8 BRob66

 
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Posted 02 December 2007 - 04:36 PM

Hi Belinda, and welcome to the board! :)

Yes, you can get a reaction--and slow your healing considerably- by continually getting cross contaminated. That tiny amount is enough to set the autoimmune response in motion.

In addition to the great advice above, you will also need a new collander--don't use one that has been used for wheat pasta.


Thanks Patti,,,all things i had not thought about
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Belinda
Recently diagnosed
gluten-free,soy-free,wheat-free,egg-free
and dairy-free
Living in Canada

#9 gottaBGfree

 
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Posted 02 December 2007 - 07:46 PM

I was able to find an awesome toaster oven that also has 2 slots for regurlar toast. That's the only appliance I have in the kichen that is designated for me ONLY, since I am the only celiac in the house! But we all must be careful with the wooden stuff, many do not think about rolling pens and even flour sifters have residue that just won't seem to be gone. Anyone who does a lot of baking may get a new set that will be safe. keep stuff like that and your new collander in a cabinet that's designated a no wheat zone:)
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Teri
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#10 dandelionmom

 
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Posted 02 December 2007 - 07:57 PM

I doubted it could make a difference until I got pretty sick from using our toaster. I thought I had it wiped out enough but I didn't.
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#11 NorthernElf

 
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Posted 03 December 2007 - 06:20 AM

I have my own toaster.

I have my own cutting boards.

Recently, I bought my own "pans" - silicone muffin & loaf pans and a silicone sheet to line my regular cookie tin. I am sure I was getting glutened from the scratched teflon pans that had cooked wheat stuff.

I have my own ziplocs, pantry shelf if gluten-free goods, and the top shelf of the fridge freezer is my stuff.

I also removed the breadmaker from the kitchen (only gluten-free person in my family) because the crumbs got everywhere & I kept glutening myself.
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#12 num1habsfan

 
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Posted 03 December 2007 - 09:47 AM

Take it from someone who's sensative enough that even the touching of a couple crumbs to what i'm eating or drinking or using is enough to make me sick. YES you must absolutely have everything separated. Buy toastabags if you want to use the same toaster, they work great even in restaurants. But it's easier to just buy a new one. I have my own toaster oven, too. At home though nobody else used it except for me so that I didnt have to worry. When i was dishes I wear rubber gloves, especially if I'm doing some that have wheat in them. I don't know anyone elses wooden spoons if I'm baking. I'm too tired at the moment to think of more haha.

Even if you're not all that sensative you can still be getting glutened and not even know it. All of us here will be glad to help you out because I'm sure we've all gone through it all!

~ Lisa ~

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