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Enterolab Results, Help!


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8 replies to this topic

#1 pixiegirl

 
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Posted 05 December 2004 - 12:49 PM

Ok I got my results from EnteroLab and I'm not sure what they mean... I guess I have two genes for the disease?

Gluten Sensitivity Stool Test
Fecal Antigliadin IgA 14 Units (Normal <10 Units*)

Stool Test for Autoimmune Reaction to Tissue Transglutaminase
Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 6 Units (Normal <10 Units)

Stool Test for Small Intestinal Malabsorption
Microscopic Fecal Fat Score: 58 Units (Normal < 300 Units)

Stool Test for Milk Sensitivity
Fecal anti-casein IgA antibody 6 Units (Negative <10 Units)

Gene Test for Gluten Sensitivity
Molecular analysis: HLA-DQB1*0201, 0201

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,2

Interpretation: Analysis of this stool sample indicates you have dietary
gluten sensitivity but levels of intestinal IgA antibodies to the human
enzyme, tissue transglutaminase, and the milk protein, casein, were below
the upper limit of normal and there was no malabsorption of dietary fat.

HLA gene analysis reveals that you have two copies of the main gene that
predisposes to gluten sensitivity and celiac sprue (HLA-DQ2). This genotype
also can predispose to microscopic colitis and other autoimmune syndromes.
Two copies of these genes are an even stronger predisposition than having
one gene and the resultant immunologic gluten sensitivity and disease may
be more severe. Furthermore, having two copies of the gene means that each
of your parents, and all of your children (if you have them) will possess
at least one copy of the gene as well.

For optimal health and prevention of small intestinal damage, osteoporosis,
damage to other tissues (like nerves, joints, pancreas, skin, liver, among
others), and malnutrition, recommend a strict gluten free diet and
re-testing in one year to insure this reaction is lessening. If you are
experiencing any symptoms, these may resolve following a gluten free diet.

As gluten sensitivity is a genetic syndrome, you may want to have your
relatives screened as well.


Thanks, Susan :huh:
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#2 pixiegirl

 
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Posted 06 December 2004 - 06:05 AM

I see people are reading this but not replying... I'll be more specific... do i have the 2 main celiac genes? Also since the rest of my values are normal or even low normal... well how could that be, I've had symptoms for at least 8-10 years?

Thanks, Susan
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#3 plantime

 
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Posted 06 December 2004 - 06:20 AM

Yes, you have two genes. Both of your parents have at least one gene for celiac. All of your children will have at least one gene for celiac. The rest of your results were normal or low-normal because the disease has not yet kicked into full gear on you. You are having some symptoms, though, so if you continue to consume gluten, you are adding dynomite to an explosive situation. It could just be that the next extremely stressful event in your life is all that it will take to trigger an explosion of problems. You now know of the impending detonation, so please be kind to yourself and your family, and defuse the timebomb.
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Dessa

The Lord bless you and keep you; the Lord make His face shine upon you and be gracious to you." Numbers 6:24-25

#4 mommida

 
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Posted 06 December 2004 - 06:39 AM

I'm not a doctor.
You have 2 genes that are strongly associated with Celiac and other known auto immune diseases.
Since the paragraph states your children will have at least one of these genes passed on to the them, would mean recessive and dominant HLA gene.
( That is just layman terms as I understand them.)
It also stated that you would be more likely to have more severe reactions because of this. With the other antibodies test does this mean your gluten sensitivity is like full blown Celiac symptoms? Sounds like the thought path of the report. Stay on a gluten free diet for life, because your genes would allow damage to your small intestine when exposed to gluten.
I hope my interpretation of your results helps.
L
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Michigan

#5 pixiegirl

 
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Posted 06 December 2004 - 07:45 AM

yes it does help some but I'm still amazed that I don't have any damage after so many years of symptoms (and the runs for 8 years). I'm gluten-free and plan to stay that way.

Susan
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#6 bigapplekathleen

 
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Posted 07 December 2004 - 08:23 AM

Have you had an endoscopy and biopsy? That's where you're gonna see if you really have symptoms....
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#7 pixiegirl

 
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Posted 07 December 2004 - 08:31 AM

No I've not had that and at this point I'm not going to. I'm assuming from the other levels in my test results that I don't have any damage yet, all those number were low normal, so from what I've been told the likelihood of my actually having damage yet is slim.

Susan
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#8 tom

 
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Posted 07 December 2004 - 01:12 PM

Have you had an endoscopy and biopsy? That's where you're gonna see if you really have symptoms....

Seems to me most of us know we "really have symptoms", biopsy or not.
Whether or not a doc sees damaged villi won't change your behavior, right ?

Re: DQ2 - My doc said that 90% of celiacs have DQ2( or DQ2 and DQ8), while the remaining 10% have only DQ8. One copy of either is enough to have the disease. The only difference in your having 2 copies of DQ2 is the part about your children being guaranteed to get DQ2.

Mommida mentioned the words recessive and dominant. Awhile ago, I looked up info on celiac heredity and genetic diseases in general and found that those words aren't relevant for us. Some traits certainly DO have recessive/dominant genes and they fall in a category called Mendelian Genetics. (Mendel discovered the recessive/dominant phenomenon and practically invented the field of genetics)
There is no recessive celiac gene.
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>>>>>>> tom <<<<<<<

Celiac 1st diagnosed as a toddler, in the 60s. Docs then, between bloodletting & leech-tending, said "he'll grow out of it" & I was back on gluten & mostly fine for 30yrs.

Gluten-free since 12-03
Dairy-free since 10-04
Soy-free since 5-07

#9 mkjolaf

 
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Posted 07 January 2005 - 11:19 PM

Hi Pixigirl and others,

I just got my results from the same lab as well and I'm wondering what you've learned about the validity of these tests and your thoughts on my results for which I'll post below... thanks.

-Michael

Gluten Sensitivity Stool Test
Fecal Antigliadin IgA 17 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Stool Test for Autoimmune Reaction to Tissue Transglutaminase
Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 16 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Stool Test for Small Intestinal Malabsorption
Microscopic Fecal Fat Score: 680 Units (Normal Range < 300 Units)

Stool Test for Milk Sensitivity
Fecal anti-casein IgA antibody 16 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Gene Test for Gluten Sensitivity
Molecular analysis: HLA-DQB1*0501, 0302

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,3 (Subtype 5,8)
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