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Enterolab Results, Help!
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9 posts in this topic

Ok I got my results from EnteroLab and I'm not sure what they mean... I guess I have two genes for the disease?

Gluten Sensitivity Stool Test

Fecal Antigliadin IgA 14 Units (Normal <10 Units*)

Stool Test for Autoimmune Reaction to Tissue Transglutaminase

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 6 Units (Normal <10 Units)

Stool Test for Small Intestinal Malabsorption

Microscopic Fecal Fat Score: 58 Units (Normal < 300 Units)

Stool Test for Milk Sensitivity

Fecal anti-casein IgA antibody 6 Units (Negative <10 Units)

Gene Test for Gluten Sensitivity

Molecular analysis: HLA-DQB1*0201, 0201

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,2

Interpretation: Analysis of this stool sample indicates you have dietary

gluten sensitivity but levels of intestinal IgA antibodies to the human

enzyme, tissue transglutaminase, and the milk protein, casein, were below

the upper limit of normal and there was no malabsorption of dietary fat.

HLA gene analysis reveals that you have two copies of the main gene that

predisposes to gluten sensitivity and celiac sprue (HLA-DQ2). This genotype

also can predispose to microscopic colitis and other autoimmune syndromes.

Two copies of these genes are an even stronger predisposition than having

one gene and the resultant immunologic gluten sensitivity and disease may

be more severe. Furthermore, having two copies of the gene means that each

of your parents, and all of your children (if you have them) will possess

at least one copy of the gene as well.

For optimal health and prevention of small intestinal damage, osteoporosis,

damage to other tissues (like nerves, joints, pancreas, skin, liver, among

others), and malnutrition, recommend a strict gluten free diet and

re-testing in one year to insure this reaction is lessening. If you are

experiencing any symptoms, these may resolve following a gluten free diet.

As gluten sensitivity is a genetic syndrome, you may want to have your

relatives screened as well.

Thanks, Susan :huh:

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I see people are reading this but not replying... I'll be more specific... do i have the 2 main celiac genes? Also since the rest of my values are normal or even low normal... well how could that be, I've had symptoms for at least 8-10 years?

Thanks, Susan

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Yes, you have two genes. Both of your parents have at least one gene for celiac. All of your children will have at least one gene for celiac. The rest of your results were normal or low-normal because the disease has not yet kicked into full gear on you. You are having some symptoms, though, so if you continue to consume gluten, you are adding dynomite to an explosive situation. It could just be that the next extremely stressful event in your life is all that it will take to trigger an explosion of problems. You now know of the impending detonation, so please be kind to yourself and your family, and defuse the timebomb.

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I'm not a doctor.

You have 2 genes that are strongly associated with Celiac and other known auto immune diseases.

Since the paragraph states your children will have at least one of these genes passed on to the them, would mean recessive and dominant HLA gene.

( That is just layman terms as I understand them.)

It also stated that you would be more likely to have more severe reactions because of this. With the other antibodies test does this mean your gluten sensitivity is like full blown Celiac symptoms? Sounds like the thought path of the report. Stay on a gluten free diet for life, because your genes would allow damage to your small intestine when exposed to gluten.

I hope my interpretation of your results helps.

L

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yes it does help some but I'm still amazed that I don't have any damage after so many years of symptoms (and the runs for 8 years). I'm gluten-free and plan to stay that way.

Susan

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Have you had an endoscopy and biopsy? That's where you're gonna see if you really have symptoms....

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No I've not had that and at this point I'm not going to. I'm assuming from the other levels in my test results that I don't have any damage yet, all those number were low normal, so from what I've been told the likelihood of my actually having damage yet is slim.

Susan

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Have you had an endoscopy and biopsy? That's where you're gonna see if you really have symptoms....

Seems to me most of us know we "really have symptoms", biopsy or not.

Whether or not a doc sees damaged villi won't change your behavior, right ?

Re: DQ2 - My doc said that 90% of celiacs have DQ2( or DQ2 and DQ8), while the remaining 10% have only DQ8. One copy of either is enough to have the disease. The only difference in your having 2 copies of DQ2 is the part about your children being guaranteed to get DQ2.

Mommida mentioned the words recessive and dominant. Awhile ago, I looked up info on celiac heredity and genetic diseases in general and found that those words aren't relevant for us. Some traits certainly DO have recessive/dominant genes and they fall in a category called Mendelian Genetics. (Mendel discovered the recessive/dominant phenomenon and practically invented the field of genetics)

There is no recessive celiac gene.

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Hi Pixigirl and others,

I just got my results from the same lab as well and I'm wondering what you've learned about the validity of these tests and your thoughts on my results for which I'll post below... thanks.

-Michael

Gluten Sensitivity Stool Test

Fecal Antigliadin IgA 17 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Stool Test for Autoimmune Reaction to Tissue Transglutaminase

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 16 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Stool Test for Small Intestinal Malabsorption

Microscopic Fecal Fat Score: 680 Units (Normal Range < 300 Units)

Stool Test for Milk Sensitivity

Fecal anti-casein IgA antibody 16 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Gene Test for Gluten Sensitivity

Molecular analysis: HLA-DQB1*0501, 0302

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,3 (Subtype 5,8)

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    • I think the posters above have given you very good information and I will throw in my 2 cents worth.  I am surprised that they did not test her DGP IgA also.  I am sure that would have been positive.  They switched off with antibody classes and usually they do both tests for both antibodies.  IgA is more specific to Celiac but the IgG is also useful.  The testing shows your daughter is producing antibodies to the gluten in her diet. (DGP IGG). THe tTg shows positive for some damage or inflammation. You know........your daughter is only 4.  She hasn't been on the planet or eating gluten that long. It can take years for enough damage to occur for it to be able to be found on biopsy.  I would say it is highly likely that this is Celiac, especially with her symptoms. But because the damage hasn't graduated to bad enough yet, they won't diagnose her. I think you need to do what others have said and get all copies of testing and find someone else who will take a look and give a diagnosis, especially if they have you do a dietary trial and her symptoms go away.  That might be the only recourse if you want faster proof. I know I would want faster.  I would not really be happy if I thought I had to keep feeding her something that was making her sick.  If you keep her on gluten long enough, the diarrhea will probably show up. BTW.........the criteria mentioned regarding diagnosis does not apply to kids.  I know it's silly and stupid but most leading Celiac specialists do not go by this criteria for kids.......adults only.  Keep that in mind because it might come up.  You could recognize it but they might not. Have you considered gene testing, to help bolster a diagnosis? As far as false positives go, it's the other way around. False negatives happen more frequently than many people think.  It's a recurring theme here.  With her symptoms, which is what I had, a bloated belly and tummy aches are telling.  Have they tested her for lactose intolerance?  That can cause similar symptoms, although it sure won't raise those 2 blood tests.  Keep looking for Celiac because there are many red flags here.
    • This 4 out of 5 criteria does not apply to children. I was never given a reason why, but it isn't.     That said, you may try to get a second opinion from another GI who may be willing to give her a firm dx.  We were in your boat 6 years ago and while I'm sure I'll get slammed for it, I wish we had kept gluten in our kiddos diet till he scoped positive for a variety of reasons.  Again, even family is different and you have to find what is best for you!
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    • It is the only thing you have eaten, so it can't be anything else?  I eat it with no issues so I am not sure how you can be certain that is the problem.  All I am saying is that its sort of "your word against mine and the company's word".  
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